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Cameras

  1. Get a Look at Conan’s Studio With Its New 360° Camera for a More Interactive Late Night Experience

    It's like you're watching the show while awkwardly standing on stage with everyone ignoring you!

    Conan O'Brien's got himself a new toy -- a 360° camera for his studio. As you can see in this sample, it lets viewers click and drag their way around the set to look wherever they'd like. It's obviously a bit of a gimmick, but what do you think? Is this something that's actually going to be used by fans?

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  2. Someone Paid Almost $1 Million for a Possibly Fake Apollo 15 Moon Camera

    Smile and say, "The Moon is made of cheese!"

    Over the weekend, a Hasselblad Electronic Data Camera that went to the surface of the Moon during the Apollo 15 mission was auctioned off and sold for almost $1 million. The only problem is that the camera may not have actually been on the Moon, or near it, or even to space.

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  3. ParaShoot Mini HD Camera Wants to Record Your Life

    It's like a GoPro for those of us who don't want to jump off of things from space.

    If you want a tiny HD camera, but your life isn't "extreme" enough to justify buying a GoPro, the KickStarter for the Parashoot might interest you. Like the GoPro it's a tiny HD video and still camera, but it's designed for everyday life. They've crushed their funding goal, but you can still back the project to score one on the cheap.

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  4. New Distortion-Free Camera Lenses Inspired by Insect Eyes

    Need a camera that can take a clear picture of the whole landscape before you? They're not easy to make and take a lot of technical know-how. Lowly critters like flies and bees, though, come with these complex devices as standard equipment. Now, a team of researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois are taking a cue from those insect eyes to design a next-generation camera lens that can capture extremely sharp images in wide field of view. And before you ask, yes, it's pretty freaky looking.

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  5. Mannequin Spies May be Dressing You With Their Camera-Eyes

    Shopping for clothes can be, for some of us, a private affair. Some people will only shop with their closest friends, others prefer to do it alone. One thing is certain: Nobody wants to get caught and judged after finding that a pair of pants doesn't fit the way it should. It may concern you, then, to find out that certain retailers have begun employing a new type of camera to keep tabs on their customers, hidden behind the eye-sockets of mannequins.

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  6. 50-Gigapixel Camera Will Help Horatio Caine Catch Killers

    Someday, people will look back at all the CSI "Enhance!" jokes and never get them. The picture above was taken by AWARE-2, a 50-gigapixel camera system built by a team led by David Brady at Duke's Pratt School of Engineering. As you can see, it has pretty insane enhance capabilities, even though it hasn't reached its 50-gigapixel theoretical limit, so given enough time and funding, we could catch a killer by enhancing a photo of a license plate.

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  7. Display-Free Camera Lends Digital Photography Some Analog Trappings

    Back in the day, there used to be some guesswork in photography. Those of you old enough to remember film will also remember the anticipation of waiting for your photos to be developed and the crushing disppointment of finding out they somehow all managed to be horrendously out of focus. Brian Matanda is trying to bring some of that joy fear excitement and uncertainty to digital photography with an interesting analog-inspired digital design called the Timeless Capture camera. Picture takin' used to be different, kids.

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  8. This Camera Only Prints Text Descriptions Of The Pictures It Takes

    Cameras are getting better and better. We've got cameras than can change focus after the fact, smartphone cameras that can shoot actual feature film footage, cameras that can shoot at 1 trillion fps, but what boring thing do these all have in common? They deal in pictures. Matt Richardson's Descriptive Camera is taking the technology in a whole new direction. The Descriptive Camera "takes" pictures like a normal camera, but it doesn't output pictures, it outputs written descriptions. How is that possible? There must be a little guy in there or something, right? Actually yes. Kind of.

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  9. The Avengers Uses Actual Footage Shot With an iPhone 4S in the Final Cut

    People have been pretty impressive with the camera the iPhone 4S is packing, but some of those people are influential enough and in the right station in life to show just how impressive the camera is. According to TiPb, Seamus McGarvey, cinematographer director for the upcoming Marvel romp, The Avengers, shot some footage for the film using the iPhone 4S, and the footage was good enough to leave in the film. Not only that, but the footage filmed with the iPhone 4S appears in the trailer as well.

    The beauty of photography or cinema is that you make every choice based on the content at hand. On The Avengers, I did a couple of shots on the iPhone and they are in the movie. In fact, they are in the trailer! I understand that sometimes there is no choice and you have to go for the cheapest option, but if you are limited for choice, you can still make poignant decisions that will effect the look of the film.

    Check out the trailer after the jump and see if you can spot the footage.

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  10. Thermal Imaging Cameras Are More Effective Way To Steal PIN Numbers

    A team of researchers from the University of California at San Diego have found that thermal imaging cameras can be used to steal PIN numbers when people make a cash withdrawal from an ATM. Residual heat from a person's finger when it touches the keypad to punch in their PIN can be viewed with an infrared camera to give away your combination without anyone having to actually see your finger on the button. For criminals, thermal imaging has some advantages. Whether or not the user visually blocks the keypad while they type their number will make no difference, and PIN harvesting can still be automated to provide crooks with a leg up. Researchers Keaton Mowery, Sarah Meiklejohn and Stefan Savage of UCSD studied 21 volunteers punching in 27 randomly selected PIN numbers on plastic and brushed metal keys. The study showed that plastic PIN pads retain the heat signature from the finger the longest showing which numbers and which order they were pressed.

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