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Intel

  1. 13-Year-Old Who Built Braille Printer Using LEGO Hopes to Have His Invention on the Market Later this Year

    Everything is awesome!

    13-year-old Shubham Banerjee might not be able to run his company full-time yet (Banerjee's mother has taken on CEO duties for his startup), but he's already invented a product that could have a huge impact on the lives of the blind.

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  2. Intel Wants Diversity in the Workplace, Puts $300 Million Where Their Mouth Is

    "This isn't just good business, it's the right thing to do."

    What's the best way to help your image after accidentally taking sides in a gender-based smear campaign in the video game world? Put forth millions of dollars toward getting more women in the industry. Oh, and they promoted Feminist Frequency. I believe they call this a mic drop.

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  3. Stephen Hawking’s New Speech System With SwiftKey Delivers His Brilliance Twice as Fast

    Hopefully the rest of us are ready for that much knowledge.

    Stephen Hawking's brain may be lightyears ahead of ours, but the computer system that helped the theoretical physicist communicate his brilliant thoughts to the world had long been stuck in the past at over 20 years old. Now he's gotten an upgrade complete with modern text-prediction capability so that he can communicate more effectively and discover what it's like to try to teach text prediction that you never, ever mean to say "ducking."

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  4. The Best Way to Get Girls Into Science and Tech? Help Them Become “Makers,” Says Intel

    Yay!

    Research shows the percentage of women earning undergraduate computer science degrees in the United States is at an all-time low, despite the fact that a sizable majority of us carry mini-computers on our person at all times these days and have the audacity to call them "phones." But a new study by Intel says there's hope for the future.

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  5. [UPDATED] Intel Supports Gamasutra With New Ads After Gamergate Debacle

    You may recall the controversy over chip maker Intel pulling an advertising campaign from Gamasutra after Gamergate complained to the company en masse about an article posted there. They've had a change of heart.

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  6. Intel Issues Official Statement Over Gamergate Related Advertising Pull

    Chip makers Intel have responded to the controversy surrounding their decision to pull an ad campaign on Gamasutra.

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  7. Intel Throws Its Chips In With Gamergate, Pulls Ads From Critical Site

    More like Dumbtel. Yeah, you heard me.

    When Zoe Quinn released 4chan #Gamergate logs earlier this month, it seemed like the movement might lose what dubious credibility it still had. But now, in the words of Boing Boing, an extremely misguided decision on behalf of Intel represents "a coup" for the manipulative movement.

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  8. This Is A Cute Bracelet! Oh, And It’s Also A Drone That Will Take Selfies For You In Mid-Air

    Does it come in black?

    Jewelry makes you feel super-cute, and it doesn't have to serve any purpose beyond that. But wouldn't it be better if all your accessories worked double-duty as amazing tech that would also make you feel like a super spy?

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  9. Build-Your-Own-Robot Kit Will Be Available Commercially By the End of the Year

    Next Holiday Season will be crazy, y'all.

    By the end of 2014, Intel says everyone and their dog will be able to buy a kit to build their own 3-D printed robot. The package will start at $1,600 -- a relatively small price to assemble your own ally for the inevitable uprising.

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  10. Intel Wants to Save Steven Hawking’s Speech

    Stephen Hawking is one of the most well regarded scientists of our day, and for decades now he has relied on technology to allow him to speak. Hawking suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, and as his condition declines, so does the rate at which he can communicate. Now, Intel says they can use new technology to increase Hawking's ability to communicate, which has dropped to as little as one word per minute.

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  11. New Coke Machine Can Take Your Picture, Has a Microphone, Is Confusing

    Intel showed off a new fancy Coca-Cola machine at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco today. Why did Intel show off a glorified sugar water dispenser? Well, that's because the device happens to house an Intel Core i7 microprocessor. It needs all that computer horsepower to function its many doodads, like the microphone it has for no apparent reason. The machine also comes equipped with a camera, which would theoretically be used to gather demographic information, but is thoroughly creepy regardless.

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  12. Intel Servers Run in Mineral Oil Bath to Cut Energy Use, Cooling Costs

    Intel servers have been getting a spa treatment to try and cut energy costs and it seems to be working. The company has been running some of its servers submerged in experimental mineral oil baths for a year in an effort to cut down the energy they use running and cooling the machines -- and the expense associated with it, lest anyone think this is a totally altruistic endeavor. After a year, the results are in, and they're pretty promising.

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  13. Ex-Intel Engineer Admits to $400 Million In Information Theft

    There are a lot of expensive things out there, but information can be one of the priciest. If you were going to rob Intel, one way to go about it would be to try and make off with bags full of chips, or you could be like ex-Intel engineer Biswamohan Pani and take some documents worth somewhere between 200 and 400 million dollars. Why? To advance his career at AMD. But for documents worth that much, Pani will get nothing but some jail time.

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  14. 17-Year-Old Invents Low-Cost Mine Detector Using Sound Waves

    Clever Girl

    I'd say I'm sick of hearing about teenagers doing more than I'll ever accomplish in my entire life but I can't do it, honestly. These kids are amazing. The latest? Seventeen-year-old Marian Bechtel. She's a finalist in the Intel Science Talent Search thanks to a low-cost device she created that can detect land mines using sound waves. Yup, like I said, amazing. 

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  15. Today Is Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day!

    Sock It To 'Em Ada

    Good news! The number of girls getting interested in STEM fields is increasing! While the number of boys is still greater, more and more teenage girls are considering engineering as a possible career, thanks to a lot of positive messaging. And now, the Intel Foundation has instituted a new "holiday" that will give everyone cause to reach out even more: Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day!

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  16. Ellen And Others Give Homeless Science Contest Hopeful A Backup Plan

    Good News Everyone!

    Eighteen-year-old Samantha Garvey put a lot of eggs in one basket when she applied for the Intel Science Talent Search. The winner of the contest will receive a $100,000 scholarship, something her and her family could desperately use considering they've been living in a homeless shelter for the last few years. The high school senior is currently at the semi-finalist stage in the talent search but her story has grabbed lots of media attention. As a result, she's been given help from Ellen DeGeneres and others to make sure she succeeds. 

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  17. Homeless Teen Attempting To Win $100,000 Intel Science Talent Search

    Clever Girl

    A 17-year-old high school senior from Brentwood, N.Y. is attempting to win the top prize at the national Intel Science Talent Search. The winner will receive a life-changing $100,000. Why would it be life-changing for this teen? She and her family are homeless. 

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  18. What it Means to be Innovative

    We're currently living in an age where we as a population are less impressed by new technological advances. The computer age sped up the rate of invention and innovation, and children of this age are tuned to simply be less impressed. The high frequency of viable new inventions and incredible innovations made us grow accustomed to them. Amazingly, we actually expect new inventions and innovations to drop at an alarmingly high rate, and rarely, nowadays, do they impress, even though they should. However, another way to look at our collective apathy toward modern day invention and innovation is to wonder if, possibly, the technological age in which we live redefined what it means to be innovative; so it's not that we're less impressed by innovation, but we don't necessarily know what it means to be innovative anymore.

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  19. Intel Announces Jaw-Dropping 50 Cores and One Teraflop Performance on Single Chip

    Intel turned some heads at a recent conference on supercomputing in Seattle when it announced Knights Corner, a single chip capable of one teraflop performance and uses 50 separate cores to pull it off. Intel claims that this new chip will deliver faster, more accurate results when performing calculations.

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  20. 5 Iconic Sound Bites in Tech

    When done right, nothing is more instantly recognizable and associable as a catchy sound bite. Once upon a time, instantly recognizable jingles were the backbone of the advertising industry. Today,  audio clips are a little more pervasive, considering our seeming dependence on electronic devices. Receive a phone call? Catchy audio clip. Get an email? Catchy sound bite. Turn on just about any modern electronic device? Memorable tune. We're living in a world where companies and devices need to differentiate themselves from the competition as much as possible, and an instantly recognizable sound bite is a three-to-ten second mean to that end. So, come with us as we check out some of the most instantly recognizable, brand differentiating, nostalgia inducing sound bites in tech.

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