comScore

Wait, what?

Looks like you came here from Geekosystem. Don't worry, everything is still here. We've just combined forces with The Mary Sue to bring you more and better content, all in one place.

Wikipedia

  1. Art+Feminism Is Hosting Its Second Ever Wikipedia Edit-a-thon To Promote Gender Equality

    Wikipedia is a great resource for all kinds of odd information, but it's often not particularly welcoming to women who want to participate in its elaborate editing process. But just talking about the problem isn't going to create more female editors—training women who are interested will.

    Read More
  2. Internet-Based Board Game Linknotize Is Like Six Degrees of Wikipedia

    Sorry, Kevin Bacon.

    Not only can you play a lot of board games on your phone instead of with a board—no matter how many luddites complain that everyone is just tapping away on their phones—but linknotize is a physical board game that you actually play by... tapping away on your phone.

    Read More
  3. Wikipedia Organizations Address Gamergate Editor Controversy: Women Are “Invaluable Contributors”

    Something wik'd this way comes.

    So what gives, Wikipedia?

    Read More
  4. Wikipedia Has Banned Five Feminist Editors From Gamergate Articles & More

    :/

    A decision was made this week by "Wikipedia's supreme court" to ban five editors who were attempting to prevent the "Gamergate Controversy" article from taking on a pro-Gamergate slant. The editors can not only no longer edit the Gamergate entry, but also any other entry having to do with "gender or sexuality, broadly construed."

    Read More
  5. Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales Isn’t Taking Any of Gamergate’s Threats, Tells Them Off Spectacularly

    *Slow clap.*

    The tough duty of defending the editing of Gamergate Wiki entries for accuracy has fallen to Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, and he's handling it admirably.

    Read More
  6. Things We Saw Today: Marion Cotillard & Michael Fassbender In Macbeth

    Things We Saw Today

    Our first look at a new version of Macbeth we previously told you about, starring Marion Cotillard and Michael Fassbender as "The Macbeths!" (via ComingSoon.net)

    Read More
  7. 12 Of The Weirdest Wikipedia Articles You Can Listen To

    Jimmy Wales, was this what you had in mind?

    Available audio versions of large texts can be very useful for blind and visually-impaired readers, which is why text-to-speech software is so popular. You know what, though? That's not Wikipedia's style. They'd rather get people to record themselves reciting articles about whatever they want -- which makes for some strange subject material.

    Read More
  8. TL;DR Wikipedia Distills the Internet’s Vast Knowledge Into Short, Sarcastic Barbs

    Finally, the information of the Internet expressed in the native language of the Internet.

    There's a lot of information on the Internet, so it can be hard to know just where to turn when you want a concise explanation of any given subject. That's where TL;DR Wikipedia comes in. They take all of the "knowledge" and "facts" and reduce it to easily remembered, sarcastic flash cards.

    Read More
  9. Wikipedia Founder Jimmy Wales Responds to Change.org Petition Asking That “Holistic Approaches to Healing” Be Taken Seriously

    You mean people don't have to do whatever a Change.org petition tells them to do?

    People in the "holistic healing" community don't like how they're being written about on Wikipedia, so they started a Change.org petition asking that Wikipedia put policies in place for their nonsense to be taken just as seriously as actual science. Jimmy Wales responded and forever won our respect.

    Read More
  10. PediaPress Wants to Print All of Wikipedia in 1,000 Books, Trees Can Be Heard Weeping

    Somebody call the Lorax.

    Man, the Internet is a convenient place to get a lot of information very quickly at the push of a button, but how can we take that and change it into a permanent, physical record that has pretty much none of those benefits? PediaPress has the answer, and they want to print all of the English language Wikipedia articles into 1,000 books.

    Read More
  11. Scientists Organize Mass Wikipedia Edit in Honor of Ada Lovelace Day

    she blinded me with science

    I'll admit, the first thing that springs to my mind when people mention organized Wikipedia edits is Wikipedia vandalism, perhaps because it's just a bit more exciting than the alternative. That is, getting a bunch of people together with viable sources and references and collaborating on expanding or creating Wikipedia entries on subjects that are often overlooked by the core community of Wikipedia editors. That's what Maia Weinstock and Anne Fausto-Sterling do every October 15th: they organize an edit-a-thon to improve the encyclopedia's coverage of female scientists. And it's that time of year again.

    Read More
  12. As Chaos Continues in Egypt, Wikipedia Can’t Decide If Latest Uprising’s a Revolution or a Coup

    Contributors to the massive online encyclopedia find themselves in conflict over how to define the recent events in Egypt.

    What's in a name? Kind of a lot, sometimes. Case in point: as supporters of the Egyptian military and those loyal to ousted former president Mohamed Morsi continue to clash in the streets, a smaller, safer clash has broken out in the pages of Wikipedia, where editors are debating whether to call this latest uprising -- which saw Morsi driven from office as the military seized control of the nation -- a coup or a revolution. That definition isn't just important semantically -- outside the hallowed halls of Wikipedia, which term is used could have real implications for U.S. foreign policy toward Egypt.

    Read More
  13. French Intelligence Forces Volunteer Sysop to Delete Wikipedia Article

    In what seems like something straight out of an updated version of 1984, the Direction Centrale du Renseignement Intérieur, or DCRI, a French intelligence agency, apparently recently summoned and subsequently forced a Wikipedia volunteer to delete an article on the online encyclopedia. This came after the agency first attempted to get Wikimedia France to remove what it considered classified information from an article about a French military compound in March. They declined to remove the offending bits, so DCRI took more drastic measures.

    Read More
  14. If Websites Existed In Game of Thrones’ Westeros

    I See What They Did There

    Caldwell Tanner didn't use HBO's Join the Realm website to create these unique House Sigils. Instead, he came up with his own designs for what popular websites might hang from their proverbial castle walls if they lived in the world of Game of Thrones. And we decided to join in on the fun. Look at the House Sigils and mottos from Twitter, Wikipedia, The Mary Sue, and more!

    Read More
  15. Mathematical Model of Wikipedia Edit Wars Dissects The World’s Greatest Nerd Fights

    Ok, I'm just going to say it -- the physicists at Aalto University may have a bit too much time on their hands, seeing as they've taken Wikipedia watching to a new extreme. Working with researchers from around Europe, they've created the first known mathematical model of editorial conflicts in Wikipedia, which tracks the birth, life and occasionally even the resolution of the Internet grudge matches that determine what is fact on the Internet's number one repository of facts.

    Read More
  16. What Are the Odds an Asteroid Will Hit Your House?

    Tomorrow the 143,000 ton asteroid 2012 DA14 will pass a mere 17,200 miles from the Earth. What does that mean for you? Nothing. There's no chance of DA14 hitting the Earth. We'll all be fine this time around, but hundreds of smaller objects strike the Earth every year. Our friends at Movoto have a handy calculator to get the odds that one will hit your house. Give it a try, and you'll probably feel a lot better about the whole thing.

    Read More
  17. Never Leave the House Again! Google Earth Adds Tours of 100,000 Places Around the World

    Good news, shut-ins! It's now even easier to kind of see the world from your computer. Google Earth has added over 100,000 places in more than 200 countries to their Tour Guide feature. The Google Earth Tour Guide combines animated flybys of places, interesting facts pulled from Wikipedia, and even user-generated Panoramio images to get a better look. Why not kill a little time pretending to explore the globe? You might learn something.

    Read More
  18. Study Finds That Wikipedia Is Having a Really, Really Hard Time Keeping Its Editors

    the internet is serious business

    Wikipedia has hit a roadblock, and it's one unrelated to those once-ubiquitous "personal appeals" for funding by founder Jimmy Wales (you know what I'm talking about). This new problem is that Wikipedia, a site that relies on the public to create their content, is having trouble holding onto people who want to contribute to it.

    Read More
  19. Things We Saw Today: RIP Nyan Cat

    Things We Saw Today

    Marty, the feline upon whom Nyan Cat is based, passed away last night. As a friend of mine said: "He is with Ceiling Cat now." (Geekosystem)

    Read More
  20. Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon Puts the Focus on Female Scientists

    Sock It To 'Em Ada

    Last month we reported that Royal Society was planning a Wikipedia edit-a-thon in conjunction with Ada Lovelace Day to beef up the pages about female scientists, engineers, and mathematicians unfairly ignored by history. Well on October 19th that edit-a-thon happened, with members of the Royal Society combining their efforts with others working remotely to create or expand approximately 40 Wikipedia entries.

    Read More
© 2015 The Mary Sue   |   About UsAdvertiseNewsletterJobsContributorsComment PolicyPrivacyUser AgreementDisclaimerContact RSS

Dan Abrams, Founder
  1. Mediaite
  2. The Mary Sue
  3. Styleite
  4. The Braiser
  5. SportsGrid
  6. Gossip Cop