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What's with the name?

Allow us to explain.

Wikipedia

she blinded me with science

Scientists Organize Mass Wikipedia Edit in Honor of Ada Lovelace Day

I’ll admit, the first thing that springs to my mind when people mention organized Wikipedia edits is Wikipedia vandalism, perhaps because it’s just a bit more exciting than the alternative. That is, getting a bunch of people together with viable sources and references and collaborating on expanding or creating Wikipedia entries on subjects that are often overlooked by the core community of Wikipedia editors.

That’s what Maia Weinstock and Anne Fausto-Sterling do every October 15th: they organize an edit-a-thon to improve the encyclopedia’s coverage of female scientists. And it’s that time of year again.

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I See What They Did There

If Websites Existed In Game of Thrones’ Westeros

Caldwell Tanner didn’t use HBO’s Join the Realm website to create these unique House Sigils. Instead, he came up with his own designs for what popular websites might hang from their proverbial castle walls if they lived in the world of Game of Thrones. And we decided to join in on the fun. Look at the House Sigils and mottos from Twitter, Wikipedia, The Mary Sue, and more!

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the internet is serious business

Study Finds That Wikipedia Is Having a Really, Really Hard Time Keeping Its Editors

Wikipedia has hit a roadblock, and it’s one unrelated to those once-ubiquitous “personal appeals” for funding by founder Jimmy Wales (you know what I’m talking about). This new problem is that Wikipedia, a site that relies on the public to create their content, is having trouble holding onto people who want to contribute to it.

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Things We Saw Today

Things We Saw Today: RIP Nyan Cat

Marty, the feline upon whom Nyan Cat is based, passed away last night. As a friend of mine said: “He is with Ceiling Cat now.” (Geekosystem)

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Sock It To 'Em Ada

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon Puts the Focus on Female Scientists

Last month we reported that Royal Society was planning a Wikipedia edit-a-thon in conjunction with Ada Lovelace Day to beef up the pages about female scientists, engineers, and mathematicians unfairly ignored by history. Well on October 19th that edit-a-thon happened, with members of the Royal Society combining their efforts with others working remotely to create or expand approximately 40 Wikipedia entries.

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she blinded me with science

Royal Society to Hold Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon for Female Scientists

Teachers might not like it, but most of us, students and non-students alike, get at least some of our information from Wikipedia. So what happens when a historical figure has a Wikipedia page with barely any information on it… or worse, no Wikipedia page at all? Can they really have been that important? Snooki’s entry is approximately 1,500 words long with 40 citations… if someone had an actual, measurable impact on, say, science and technology, shouldn’t we be able to type in their name and read more than a few sentences about it? There’s a Schrödinger’s cat joke here—I can’t quite reach it, but you know what I mean.

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For A More Civilized Age

Wikipedia, Your Gender Bias is Showing

Women of the Internet, start your editing engines. If it’s one thing we’ve learned recently from go-to Web info source Wikipedia, it’s that what the user-edited encyclopedia could use more of is you.

Researcher Santiago Oritz has developed Wikipedia Gender, “an interactive visualization that shows which articles have more male or female editors”. The graph matrix runs the spectrum of user ratio against female-to-male, with scrollover dots and a color key that help identify specific subjects. Two things immediately become clear: First, that the number of male editors far outweighs female editors (as reported by the New York Times earlier this year, women make up just 13% of total contributors). Two, that, apparently, the only subjects where the ratio almost levels out are on drastically female-body-oriented subjects like menstruation, or, for reasons that could perhaps merit their own article, gender identity. In fact, of the 3,000 articles analyzed by Ortiz, the only article that has a female majority is the one for the Cloth Menstrual Pad. Understandable, but….yikes.

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Things We Saw Today

Things We Saw Today: A Picture of Stan Lee Wearing Nothing But A Comic Book

My advise is not to read into it much, but that is a Hulk comic. Here’s where to go if you want to know how this happened. (Tumblr)

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she blinded me with science

The UK Pledges to Make All Publicly Funded Research Publicly Available With the Help of Wikipedia

The scientific community has been in a bit of a stir this year, ever since mathematician Tim Gowers wrote a post on his blog stating his intention sto abandon publishing his findings with any journal run by Elsevier, the world’s largest scientific publisher, citing the stranglehold a publisher that large can have on the world’s peer-reviewed scientific information, controlling not just how it’s published, but what it costs to read or even obtain a copy. One step in the right direction, according to many, is to create laws or programs that would ensure that all publicly funded scientific studies were eventually (or immediately) made publicly available.

Well, England’s Science Minister just struck decisive blow for what’s being called the Open Science movement, by promising just that.

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Things We Saw Today

Things We Saw Today: A Unicorn Cupcake!

How — how, I ask you — is anyone supposed to eat this? (via Geeks Are Sexy)

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