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RIAA

  1. Six Strikes And You’re Out: What The Copyright Alert System Means For You

    As of today, three of the major Internet service providers in the United States -- Verizon, Time Warner, and AT&T -- are teaming up with the MPAA and RIAA to let you know that they're watching when you use torrents  to download music, movies or TV shows, and that they don't approve. That disapproval will initially be registered by warnings that remind you that Big Brother your ISP is watching -- the digital equivalent of a disapproving glare -- but that's not the only measure they have at their disposal. Repeat offenders could find themselves blocked from certain sites or even have their connection cut entirely, if temporarily. Keep reading to learn what we know about the new policy, what we don't, and how it could impact the way you use the Internet -- especially if you use it to download media, and come on, who doesn't?

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  2. Copyright Holders Want Google to Kill Its Nonexistent Daily Limit on DMCA Takedown Requests

    Obviously, copyright holders have a right to protect their content from being pirated on the Internet, but automatic Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown requests are the absolute pits when it comes to copyright law enforcement. Companies flood Google with thousands of requests a day to remove content that often in no way violates the law. Sometimes it's even the copyright holder's own content. Now anti-piracy groups RIAA and BREIN want Google to eliminate its daily limit on takedown requests, even though Google doesn't have a daily limit on takedown requests.

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  3. RIAA Never Told Six Strikes System Partners the Group’s Independent Expert Once Lobbied for Them

    The copyright alert system, commonly referred to as the "six strikes" system, might have hit a snag this past week. Part of the anti-piracy plan requires an "impartial and independent" expert to review all data gathered to ensure that the alerts are being distributed accurately and judiciously. As it currently stands, the system being used, called MarkMonitor, is supposed to then be itself monitored by Stroz Friedberg, a third-party technology firm. Unfortunately, it turns out that Stroz Friedberg was once the lobbying firm for the Recording Industry Association of America. Even worse? The RIAA supposedly didn't bother telling the rest of the group.

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  4. Survey Says: Illegal Downloaders Also Purchase More Legal Music Than Those That Don’t Pirate

    The argument has long been that music piracy leads to a massive loss of revenue when accumulated across the millions of songs downloaded illegally. That's what groups like the RIAA have pushed for years. According to the American Assembly's upcoming Copy Culture Survey, however, that's just not the case. As it turns out, those that pirate in the United States also purchase around 30% more music than those that don't.

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  5. Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Pandora Pays Artists Millions in Royalties, Not Profitable

    Internet radio, for all the complaints that it receives, is not a field that sees a great amount of participation. Due to the fees imposed by the RIAA, Internet radio has never really been a cost-effective business strategy for most. Webcasting has essentially been abandoned by the likes of Yahoo! and MSN, even though they built a large audience for their respective services. Pandora is probably the most well-known Internet radio company and is still struggling to turn a profit. Part of this is because they pay millions in royalties.

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  6. MPAA, RIAA Would Like Some Help From the Government in Fighting Piracy, Please

    When copyright czar Victoria Espinel asked for input from the public about what to do about the future of copyright law and the increasing ease of piracy, she couldn't be surprised when the MPAA and RIAA weighed in with their opinions on the matter. Those opinions -- expressed in the form of a 28 page wishlist released last Friday -- are unsurprising. Oh, except for the parts that are completely out of touch with reality -- like the idea that uploading a video you don't have the rights to should be a felony, because it is just like murder. Right? Right. That notion was a non-starter when it was a part of SOPA, but that doesn't mean it's off the organizations' laundry list of turn-ons.

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  7. Kim Dotcom Raid Footage Surfaces

    The MegaUpload raid is still a major point of contention. When the site was taken down and founder Kim Dotcom arrested, it was said that the raid made on his sprawling mansion was excessive to the point of lunacy. Officers with semiautomatic rifles and police helicopters were likely not needed for such an operation, even if he were the piracy kingpin groups like the RIAA or MPAA claimed. This broadcast from 3 News has revealed footage of the raid from the police helicopter's point of view.

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  8. Major ISPs To Start Throttling Repeat Torrent Pirates This Summer

    This summer, pirates who torrent copyrighted material and have a major ISP are in for a rude awakening. Starting July 12th most major ISPs, including Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, and Time Warner Cable, will begin taking steps to first "educate" and ultimately "mitigate" pirates by adopting a system of graduated warnings after which repeat offenders may experience throttling of their broadband connection. While the plan was agreed on last year, a list of some of the ISPs involved only came to light yesterday at the Association of American Publishers' annual meeting yesterday, where they were announced by RIAA CEO Cary Sherman.

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  9. “Send Them Your Money” Campaign Suggests You Pay the MPAA and RIAA for Piracy Losses with Copied Currency

    When it comes to battling piracy, there's a pretty huge semantic problem that is getting in the way of dealing with the real issue. Organizations like the RIAA and the MPAA tend to treat pirated copies of software as stolen copies of software when they're calculating their (inaccurate) annual losses to piracy. In actuality, piracy -- while illegal -- is not theft; it's piracy. That's why it's called piracy, not theft. In a bid to drive this point home, a little project called Send Them Your Money has suggested an elegantly flippant way to "appease" the MPAA and RIAA: Send them full compensation for their losses in the form of copied dollar bills.

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  10. Study Shows That BitTorrent Piracy Doesn’t Affect U.S. Box Office Profits

    Ever since what seems like the beginning of time, or at least the beginning of widespread digital piracy, groups like the RIAA and MPAA have been projecting their losses by assuming that every illegal download was actually a legitimate purchase lost. While the problems behind that logic may be clear to you or me, the fallacy persists in a lot of anti-piracy arguments. A new study, Reel Piracy: The Effect of Online Film Piracy on International Box Office Sales, has shown that BitTorrent has not had any actual effect on U.S. box office earnings and that a large percentage of losses due to piracy abroad may, in fact, be the movie industry's own fault.

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