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math

  1. Maryam Mirzakhani Becomes First Woman to Earn Fields Medal for Mathematics in Its 78 Year History

    Mathematical!

    The Fields Medal, or the International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, has been awarded to 2 to 4 mathematicians under the age of 40 every four years since 1936. This year, for the first time, it will be awarded to a female mathematician: Iranian born Maryam Mirzakhani.

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  2. In Which Vi Hart Explains Why Some Infinities Are Bigger Than Others [VIDEO]

    Mathemagical!

    I have a vague grade school memory of countering someone's declaration that they were cooler than me "times infinity" with my being cooler than them "times infinity plus one." Turns out, my claim has at least some potential for validity, because infinities come in different sizes. I'll let the brilliant Vi Hart explain.

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  3. Today Is The Last Day Of The World Science Festival, Catch The Final Livestreams Right Here

    Get a little science on your Sunday.

    Today is the last day of the World Science Festival in Brooklyn! If you've missed out so far, don't worry - you can catch livestreams of the final events right here at 1pm, 4pm, and 5pm EDT.

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  4. Mathematical Model Predicts Computers Will Never Become Self-Aware, Saves Us From Judgment Day

    Unless the computers they used for their calculations are trying to throw us off track...

    A scientific model of how consciousness works in the human brain might mean that it's mathematically impossible for computers to ever become self aware. So, we're never going to all get slaughtered/enslaved by robots! Well, not robots that think for themselves, anyway.

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  5. Rhesus Monkeys Can Do Math, Time to Trade in Your TI-84 and Get Yourself a Math Monkey

    Alright. Your calculator is still probably better at math, but it's not as cute.

    As the saying goes, if you put 100 monkeys with typewriters in a room long enough, you'll get Hamlet. That's not true, but apparently if you put some rhesus monkeys in a room with numbers and reward them for choosing the right one long enough, you can get them to do math.

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  6. STEM Hiring Managers Often Favor Male Candidates, Says Yet Another Study

    Sigh. These findings aren't groundbreaking, but they shine more light on a very real problem: Hiring managers, both men and women, often perceive male candidates to be better qualified for science and tech jobs, even when their actual on-paper qualifications say otherwise. Fixing the STEM gender gap isn't just about encouraging interested students -- it's about making sure those students can get jobs one day.

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  7. 6 Carefully Calculated Ways To Celebrate Pi Day

    Sock It To 'Em Ada

    Three-point-one-four cheers for Pi Day! Yes, it’s March 14, the day when nerds revel in the intersection of math puns and dessert consumption. While eating pie is the best and most correct way to commemorate the day, I’m here to recommend some more colorful activities, intended to please your brain rather than your belly. Not that I’m scrapping tradition entirely. A thematically appropriate pie pairing is suggested for each activity.

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  8. ViHart Tries to Bake Cookies, Only Bakes Math

    om nom nom

    MATH, I said MATH. And anyway, you cook... never mind. Mathy-lady ViHart got together with mathy friends Andrea Hawksley, and Gwen and Ruth Fisher, and tried to make shortbread cookies without demonstrating any higher geometry concepts. They failed, but it was a delicious failure. Previously in Math

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  9. Guys, There’s a Paper That Describes the Relationship Between Lizzie Bennet and Mr. Darcy Using Math

    Peanut Butter and Chocolate

    "A mathematical model is proposed for interpreting the love story between Elizabeth and Darcy portrayed by Jane Austen in the popular novel Pride and Prejudice. The analysis shows that the story is characterized by a sudden explosion of sentimental involvements, revealed by the existence of a saddle-node bifurcation in the model. The paper is interesting not only because it deals for the first time with catastrophic bifurcations in romantic relation-ships, but also because it enriches the list of examples in which love stories are described through ordinary differential equations…. A series of small discoveries can give rise to a sudden turning-point in the development of a love story. In mathematical terms these turning-points are nothing but so-called catastrophes, which, in the case of Pride and Prejudice, are technically revealed by the existence of a saddle-node bifurcation.” — Discover has a lingo-laced excerpt from the paper "A mathematical model of 'pride and prejudice'" ("as a consequence of the letter the upper saddle-node bifurcation curve is crossed from below and this crossing implies a discontinuous jump from x’ to x”’..."), plus a graph. A graph. It's so beautiful. Are you following The Mary Sue on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, & Google +?

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  10. This Guy Probably Just Won A Million Dollars For Doing Math; Suddenly Wish I Was Better At Math

    This prize is sweeter than 3.1415926535897.

    Okay, so it's not the most foolproof of "get-rich-quick" schemes, but one man from Kazakhstan may have just become a millionaire - through math. Spending the last thirty years working on a math proof that has stumped mathematicians for decades, Mukhtarbay Otelbayev thinks he's solved it - and he wants the prize.

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