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  1. Video of Flying Tigerfish Proves They Are as Scary as They Sound

    Don't go into the African fresh bodies of water (especially if you are a defenseless little barnswallow).

    Because a meter-long African fish with sixteen razor-sharp teeth wasn't already horrifying, video footage has been taken for the first time proving that the freshwater tigerfish find their hapless prey in the sky as well as underwater. Monsters of the world, shots have been fired.

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  2. David Tennant Narrates Nature Documentary Featuring Robot Turtle and Stoned Dolphins

    this exists

    It's a real nature documentary. With David Tennant, robot spy turtles, and dolphins that get high by bothering puffer fish. Oh, sure if you want details you can go read them at Geekosystem. But I'm perfectly happy just knowing that this exists in the abstract.

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  3. Shelter Is A Tale of Motherhood, Loss, and Survival. It Is Also A Badger Simulator.

    Review

    I awoke in my den, surrounded by four yipping cubs — and a motionless one, curled into a ball. Oh god. Two seconds into Shelter, and already I’d failed as a parent. I approached the cub, and gave a bark, trying to wake it. Its siblings responded. The still one did not. At a loss, I walked down a tunnel, wondering what I could’ve done. I came upon a root vegetable. I grabbed it between my sharp teeth, and continued on. But as I tried to walk down the tunnel, I kept balking backward. The game wouldn’t let me leave my offspring behind. I thought for a moment, and returned to the lifeless cub. I offered the vegetable. My cub wolfed the tuber down, and color returned to its fur. It got to its feet, and trotted along after me. A voice appeared in my head, cutting through the game’s mellow soundtrack. “Having successfully learned to feed her cubs, the young mother can now venture into the forest.” “Who’s that?” I asked. “I’m Sir David Attenborough,” the voice said. “I will be providing your imaginary narration.” 

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  4. Let’s Go Ahead And Add “Makes Lasers” To Graphene’s Already Impressive Resume

    Graphene continues to impress by showing its ability to create ultrashort pulses of laser light.

    We get it, graphene -- you're amazing. We've more or less accepted that there's nothing graphene can't do, but that doesn't stop us from being amazed every time it does something new. It's newest feat is that the super-material can be used to create ultrashort-pulse lasers. Damn, graphene. Save some cool stuff for the other materials to do.

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  5. New Distortion-Free Camera Lenses Inspired by Insect Eyes

    Need a camera that can take a clear picture of the whole landscape before you? They're not easy to make and take a lot of technical know-how. Lowly critters like flies and bees, though, come with these complex devices as standard equipment. Now, a team of researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois are taking a cue from those insect eyes to design a next-generation camera lens that can capture extremely sharp images in wide field of view. And before you ask, yes, it's pretty freaky looking.

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  6. Leigh Martin Turns Yarn Into Realistic Mushrooms, Plants Them

    Meanwhile...

    Leigh Martin is an artist and knitter who lately has found an outlet for her passions in designing and creating fifty two different species of fungi out of yarn, and then photographing them in their "natural habitat." She hopes that her work can offer viewers "a greater awareness of their natural surroundings, a sense of how complex every ecosystem is and greater vision for noticing and enjoying these details in their daily life."

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  7. Newly Sequenced Coelacanth Genome Could Provide Hints to Evolution of First Land Animals

    An international team of researchers have sequenced the genome of the a living fossil and one of the coolest, oldest fish to roam the seas -- the noble coelacanth. Beyond triggering our excitement over pretty much any living fossil-related news, better understanding the DNA of this ancient fish could offer researchers a glimpse into how the earliest land animals made their way out of the primeval seas -- an impressive feat, even if it was only onto the equally primeval beach.

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  8. Fossilized Dinosaur Nest Offers Clues to Baby Dino Development

    While the sonogram that our own Glen Tickle keeps on his desk proves that he is an adorable and loving father, it's not awesome because it's a sonogram of his daughter, not a dinosaur. We've heard this kid is pretty great, and have no reason to believe otherwise, but she's no dinosaur. Paleontologists with the University of Toronto have discovered a way more awesome embryo to look at on a dig site in China -- dozens of dinosaur fossils in various stages of embryonic development. At 125 million years old, the fossils are the oldest dinosaur embryos ever found and have the potential to teach researchers a great deal about how baby dinosaurs developed. This is, of course, a very important key to us making real-life Jurassic Park at some point in the future, and thus something we need to know all about as soon as possible.

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  9. Hepatitis A Steals Skin From Infected Cells to Hide From Immune System

    If there is one thing science teaches us, it's that everything horrible is way more horrible once you understand it better. Today's latest case in point: Hepatitis A, a chronic disease that rots away the human liver, has been found to demonstrate an unexpected adaptation that makes it even more horrible. Once it has invaded a host, the virus cloaks itself in the lipid membrane from infected liver cells to hide from the immune system, marking the first time a virus has been found to use a Buffalo Bill-style skin suit as a means of stealth.

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  10. New Treatment Could Blast Cocaine Addiction Out of the Brain With Lasers

    Cocaine addiction is notoriously difficult to treat, but researchers working on ways to fight it may have a unexpected new weapon in their arsenal -- lasers. Recent research in the field of optogenetics suggests that using lasers to turn certain parts of the brain on and off could help to curb addicts craving for the drug. Take that, cocaine addiction! Pew pew pew!

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