comScore
The Mary Sue

Stargate SG-1

The Two Baddest Ladies of Stargate Have Joined Syfy’s New Show Dark Matter

My queens!

Syfy's newest space opera Dark Matter is loading up with kick-ass women, so you can sign us right up, thanks.

Read More

Stargate Reboot Trilogy Still Tragically Happening, Has Writers Now

"What the show needs is a sexy female alien!"

I keep thinking that if I just close my eyes and sing the Stargate SG-1 theme song loud enough, news of the franchise being rebooted by original movie director Roland Emmerich will just cease to exist. Sadly, I've traveled through a Quantum Mirror into the worst timeline and now the reboot even has writers attached. Where is General Hammond to protect the sanctity of the Stargate program when you need him?

Read More

KREE! This Woman Made A 3D-Printed Stargate That Actually Lights Up And Dials!

Chevron seven, locked.

Holy frozen bad guys, someone get Walter Harriman on the phone stat!

Read More

AMC Picks Up Humans, Syfy Goes For Dark Matter

All sci-fi, all the time.

2015 is stacking up to be a pretty great year for sci-fi programming, if recent acquisitions are any indication. Both AMC and Syfy have picked up shows with high sci-fi themes, including robots and lost spaceships.

Read More

Confirmed: New Stargate Trilogy Will Start The Story Over

Why, Ra? Why?

Confused about how the planned Stargate reboot could build on the 1994 film? Turns out it won't... kind of. Dean Devlin, co-writer of the original movie, told The Portland Business Journal that the new trilogy will be millions of light years away from the original. Sorry, Sha'uri: guess you're stuck with him.

Read More

Nice Knowing You: Dangerous Asteroid Apophis is Bigger, More Dangerous Than We Thought

The asteroid Apophis, clearly named for the Stargate SG-1 villain, has been called a "doomsday asteroid," because in 2004 there was a study that said there was a 2.7% chance of Apophis hitting Earth when it flies past us in 2029. That study has since been disproved, but astronomers are keeping a close eye on Apophis anyhow, which is due for another pass in 2036. One telescope in Europe has captured new images of Apophis that reveal it's even larger than initially believed. That can't be good.

Read More

© 2017 The Mary Sue, LLC | About Us | Advertise | Subscription FAQ | Privacy | User Agreement | Disclaimer | Contact | RSS RSS
Dan Abrams, Founder

  1. Mediaite
  2. The Mary Sue
  3. RunwayRiot
  4. LawNewz
  5. Gossip Cop