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female directors

5 Female Writer/Directors Better Suited to Batgirl Than Joss Whedon

Batgirl is a symbol that belongs to everyone, particularly to women, girls, and anyone on the female side of the spectrum who needs a hero in which they can see her/themselves. Joss Whedon isn't the voice we need to be hearing on this right now. Here are five women who could be.

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DGA Touts TV’s Most Inclusive Season, But Do They Even Understand What Counts as Inclusion?

The best thing about the current "Golden Age of Television" is that there's so much of it. Sure to us fans and consumers of content, it can seem a bit overwhelming, but every new TV show or limited series provides hundreds of jobs to hundreds of working professionals, many of them women, men of color, or members of other marginalized groups who are typically underemployed.

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Kristen Stewart’s Narrative Directorial Debut Come Swim “a Surrealistic Journey” Through Anxiety

Refinery 29 is doing good work with its Shatterbox Anthology series, which puts the focus on female directors directing their first narrative short films. The series that brought us Courtney Hoffman's The Good Time Girls (which led to her getting her feature debut over at Amblin) and Gabourey Sidibe's The Story of Four, a fiercely feminine and nuanced look at the effects of racism in America, now brings us a film by Kristen Stewart.

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Exclusive Clip: Marianna Palka’s Feminist Dark Comedy Bitch Shows a Family in Shambles When Mom Disappears

The emotional and domestic labor that women are expected to provide for free (while men get to think about themselves and their own needs) often gets taken for granted. In this exclusive clip from the upcoming feminist dark comedy, Bitch, we see what a family might look like if Mom suddenly weren't around.

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Director Nora Twomey Delivers a Film That “Celebrates the Strength of Afghan Women” in The Breadwinner

Irish director Nora Twomey, has already made a huge impression on animation as the director of the Academy Award-nominated film, The Secret of Kells. Now, she's delivering her second feature film, The Breadwinner, based on the best-selling children's novel by Deborah Ellis.

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Francesca Andre’s Short Film Charcoal Explores Generational Effects of Colorism

You can't go very far as a woman of color without encountering the oppressive nature of colorism. While it certainly affects men's lives as well, the way it's tied to beauty standards for women (and the sexism involved in women being taught their only value lies in physical beauty) makes the way in which they interact with it distinct. Filmmaker Francesca Andre explores this in a unique way in her short film, Charcoal.

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Rose McGowan Cancels All Upcoming Appearances Because She Has Activism to Do

Ever since news of Harvey Weinstein's abuses broke, actress-director-activist Rose McGowan has been at the center of a lot of support, backlash, and everything in between. Add onto that the general emotional overwhelm we've all felt as all the "me toos" started rolling out, and it's understandable that McGowan might not be too keen on flash bulbs and film industry hoopla right now.

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Don’t Let the Title Fool You: Bitch Looks Like a Worthwhile Feminist Satire

Director Marianna Palka has taken a loaded word and a batshit premise and managed to create a feminist satire that seems to be as insightful and incisive as it is funny and weird. Check out the trailer for her new film, Bitch, above!

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[VIDEO]: Angela Robinson Praises Her Brilliant Professor Marston and the Wonder Women Cast

Our Professor Marston and the Wonder Women coverage started with Angela Robinson. It's only fitting that it end with her, too. Robinson's film opens today in the U.S, and if you're looking for a film to see this weekend, I would highly recommend it.

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Team Bobby: Steve Carell and the Battle of the Sexes Team Examine Bobby Riggs, the “Benign Self-Promoter”

Yesterday, I brought you Part 1—A.K.A. the "Team Billie Jean" session—of the Battle of the Sexes press conference this weekend. Today, it's "Team Bobby's" turn, as members of the cast and crew, led by Steve Carell, and directors Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton, talk about the complex figure who is former tennis pro, Bobby Riggs.

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From Costume Designer to Feature Director: Courtney Hoffman Is Amblin’s Pick to Direct Action Flick Ruthless

Talk of increasing the number of women who direct in Hollywood tends to focus on getting "new" women into the industry, and while that's a worthwhile goal, studios and producers shouldn't forget that there are mid-career women already working in the industry who would be capable directors. Which is why the story of how Courtney Hoffman got her feature film directing debut is so awesome.

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Things We Saw Today: Rami Malek Looks Perfect as Queen’s Freddie Mercury

Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Caught in a landslide no escape from reality—

Mama, ooooooooooooh. Rami Malek is in full hair and makeup as Queen's frontman for the upcoming movie Bohemian Rhapsody and I am singing about it. A lot.

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BBC Put Together a List of the 100 Greatest Comedies of All Time, Apparently Forgot Women Exist

What moves a film from good to great in the eyes of a critic? What makes someone prefer Animal House to Clueless? Personal taste, sure. But we can't pretend that things like representation and unconscious bias don't play into that taste, and that "personal" taste isn't largely influenced by larger cultural trends.

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Niecy Nash Reminds Chelsea Handler That Diversity Goes Beyond “Black and White Women”

We've written about TNT's Claws, which stars the incomparable Niecy Nash at the head of a diverse cast of nuanced female characters, has a black female showrunner, and was created, in part, by a woman of color. It's certainly an example of progress. But, as Nash points out in a recent appearance on Netflix's Chelsea, diversity goes beyond "black and white."

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Ava DuVernay Continues to Kill It With a S3 Renewal For Queen Sugar and a New Deal with Oprah

If you haven't been watching Queen Sugar, get thee to OWN (or to Hulu, where I've been watching it, because I'm a heathen who doesn't have cable) and prepare yourself for some of the most powerful, thought-provoking, and visually stunning storytelling on TV right now. And there will be plenty more to enjoy, as Queen Sugar just got renewed for a third season!

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Interview: Birthright: A War Story Filmmakers Say “The Issue Is Not Abortion” When It Comes to the Erosion of Women’s Rights

I had the chance to speak with Birthright: A War Story's writer/director/co-Executive producer Civia Tamarkin and its co-Executive producer/writer Luchina Fisher about the film, as well as how the implications of the laws discussed go way beyond abortion.

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Review: Netflix’s G*psy a Frustrating, Bland Rumination on Obsession and Addiction

I really want to like Netflix's G*psy. Created by writer Lisa Rubin and starring the talented and generally fascinating Naomi Watts, it provides us with exactly the kind of nuanced, complicated female character I crave in my media. If only the result weren't so...bland.

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Things We Saw Today: Westworld‘s Evan Rachel Wood the Latest Celeb to Support #Ham4All

In addition to raising money for a great cause, one of the best things about the #Ham4All challenge is listening to a variety of voices sing music from Hamilton. This time, it's Westworld's Evan Rachel Wood doing her best Angelica Schuyler while singing a bit from "Satisfied."

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More Speculation Whiplash: Did Patty Jenkins Just Confirm She’ll Be Directing Wonder Woman 2?

The will she/won't she of Patty Jenkins' involvement with the inevitable Wonder Woman sequel has been going on for a few weeks now. First, it was definitely happening; then the movie was happening, but Jenkins wasn't attached; then she was maybe writing it? But the way Jenkins is talking now is pretty darn encouraging.

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On Sofia Coppola and The Beguiled: What “Supporting Female Filmmakers” Really Means

There's been a lot of discussion surrounding Sofia Coppola's star-studded novel adaptation, The Beguiled, which comes out Friday. One of the larger topics of discussion is how, despite slavery being addressed in the original source material—complete with a black female character named Hallie—Coppola's film addresses none of it, instead erasing that character and choosing instead to stick with what's familiar: white, Southern femininity.

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