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DC Comics May Be Killing Off Their Most Famous Black Character As Two More Creators Voluntarily Leave Their Titles


Character deaths aren’t an unusual thing in comic books but a huge nerve was hit yesterday when it was revealed DC Comics was planning to kill off Green Lantern John Stewart. The news came out amidst two more DC writers stepping off their new titles before any issues hit stores. Hit the jump for reasons, rumors, and more. 

Two big name creators are wrapping up their runs on two of DC’s best-selling titles. Geoff Johns is exiting Green Lantern with issue #20 after revamping the title back in 2004 with Green Lantern: Rebirth. Grant Morrison is leaving Action Comics where he’d been telling early-career Superman stories in The New 52. DC announced writer Robert Venditti would be taking over Green Lantern but that the entire GL line would also be changed up. Josh Fialkov would now be writing the Green Lantern Corps and Red Lantern books, while Andy Diggle was said to be taking over Action Comics. Interviews were done, advertisements prints, only to have Fialkov and Diggle step down in the same week.

Let’s discuss Diggle’s decision first. He tweeted, “Sadly, I’ve decided to walk away from Action Comics for professional reasons. It was the toughest decision I’ve ever had to make, especially with Superman’s 75th anniversary and Man of Steel on the horizon. But it was the right decision. No regrets. Onwards!”

From what I can gather, Diggle will have one issue, #19, published. After that, artist Tony Daniel will be both artist and writer for Action Comics. Daniel had this to say about the decision on his Facebook page:

Yes, many have heard, Andy Diggle left Action Comics after the first issue. I can only say I feel bad he made that decision. I think it was the wrong one, but that was his choice to make. For the remainder of the arc I’ll be working off his plots to finish out this first arc. So essentially, I become ‘scripter’ in the credits w/ Andy as ‘plotter.’ As for myself, I end my short run after I complete this first arc, which ends with issue 21. This was preplanned since last fall as there is another project I’ll be taking on, and assisting with, a massive project with DC. I still think people will like this arc and I’m staying as true as I can be to Andy’s plans for this story. In the end I hope he’ll find it somewhat recognizable as something he took part in.

Now to Fialkov. He said on his website:

There were editorial decisions about the direction of the book that conflicted with the story I was hired to tell, and I felt that it was better to let DC tell their story the way they want. I’m grateful for the opportunity and I’ll miss working with the entire Green Lantern team. This was not an easy decision to make emotionally or financially, but, I’m sure it was the right decision for both me, and for the Green Lantern books.

Bleeding Cool reported those conflicting “editorial decisions” were DC’s plan to kill off John Stewart. Comic Book Resources later reported, confirming that reasoning. As to that story, Fialkov tweeted, “I’m not commenting on anything other than what I posted.” Bleeding Cool has since reported DC has changed their minds on axing the character, seemingly because of the intense reaction.

And why the intense reaction? Well, John Stewart is kind of a big deal.

DC Comics does not have the most diverse cast of characters and when John Stewart was introduced in the early 70s he made quite the splash. Since then, he’s gone on to become one of the most, if not the most famous African-American characters DC has (I’d list Static as a very close second.). A big part of that popularity can be attributed to Stewart’s starring role in the DC animated universe, where a whole generation grew up thinking he was THE Green Lantern. So much so many wanted to know who that white guy was in the movie starring Ryan Reynolds. I’m not over exaggerating.

Putting aside the fact of character deaths being a lame way to try and boost sales, the possible death of John Stewart is also incredibly problematic. Why? Well besides there being too few big-name POCs in the DCU, DC recently introduced a new Earth-based Green Lantern. This new GL is Simon Baz, an Arab-American. Killing off Stewart so soon after introducing him reeks of the token minority character trope. As if someone said, “Well, we can’t have two Green Lanterns from Earth who aren’t white.”

Whether that’s a conscious decision or not, in an editorial position, you have to be aware that’s how it can appear from the outside and consider the implications. It’s something I’ve been noticing a lot on AMC’s The Walking Dead lately. A new black character will show up, only to have the previous one killed, like two are somehow too many. Again, I’m not saying there’s malicious intent here, just that you have to be aware of things like this when making such editorial decisions.

To that end, I also must mention how bad this looks for DC as a publisher to prospective creators. More and more DC is sounding like a company in which the editors tell the writers what to write and when to write it instead of letting them do the creative job they were hired to do. If writers don’t have a say in the creative process, what’s the point of them? And why hire someone if you haven’t already asked for, and approved of, their ideas?

This also looks terrible to fans who are now witnessing these types of behind-the-scenes decisions unfold on social media all too often. Seeing a creator you enjoy taken off a book or leaving voluntarily because of disagreements with editorial is extremely disappointing. Here’s hoping this trend won’t continue. If it does, I can easily see the creative output at the company tumbling downhill, and fast. I mean, would you want to write for a company knowing this is what you’re stepping into?

Edit: CBR has an updated report. ”Lots of rumors out there. Here’s the truth: ["Green Lantern Corps" writer] Van [Jensen] and I have never even contemplated killing John Stewart,” Venditti tweeted. “We have plenty of plans for John. Plans that probably wouldn’t work as well if he was, you know, dead.” DC’s Executive Director of Publicity Alex Segura retweeted that statement and added, “Seeing a lot of unverified reports on this. To clarify: John Stewart is not going anywhere.”

(via The Beat, The Beat, Bleeding Cool, Comic Book Resources)

Previously in DC Comics

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=48611001 Neal Johnson

    Editors don’t sell books, writers and artists do.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Diana-OmegaSama-Davidsson/100000695823547 Diana OmegaSama Davidsson

    I have honestly stopped reading any DC titles after what they did to Wonder Woman. So this and the other controversies lately around DC doesn’t surprise me.

  • Anonymous

    I still don’t understand why there are so many Green Lanterns from Earth in the first place.

  • http://zadl.org/ Captain ZADL

    Sounds like DC may not be around for Superman’s 75th at this rate. It’s a shame, too. But if management is going to be so stupid as to keep driving fans, authors, and artists away….

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    I’m just going to go ahead and put this right here…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_black_superheroes#DC_Comics

    While Wikipedia isn’t the holy grail of information, or even the phonebook of
    information, that’s a decent representation of black characters in the
    DC universe. Also, Cyborg and Steel are pretty well known to comic book
    fans and were neglected from the extensive list of ‘Jon Stewart and Static
    Shock’.

    Not to say that a lot of mediums don’t love to shove out one minority the second the next one pops up, (looking at you The Walking Dead) but Jon Stewart really wasn’t a huge favorite in the fans eyes. (When he came on to the scene he was an extremely offensive stereotype of a black man in the 70′s and was pretty poorly
    received. Since then, they’ve toned down his ‘attitude’, leaving what – in my opinion – is an emotionless, empty character.) Honestly, every member of the Justice League has a defining characteristic when it comes to their character.

    It’s what makes The Flash, Batman, and Hawkgirl fan favorites. Jon Stewart cannot boast as much. If anything killing him off is probably less racist since, he seems to only be there to add racial diversity as it stands now. And again, you can’t really say that the Justice League just has Jon Stewart to represent diversity when Cyborg, Black Lightning, and Steel (to name a few) have all not only been in the Justice League comics as members, but have also appeared in multiple animated series.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1841108884 Craig Forshaw

    It was explained in ‘Blackest Night’ and ‘Final Crisis’ – Earth is (a) where all sentient life in the universe began, and is (b) the cornerstone of all 52 universes.

    Now I have one for you: how do you kill an infinite number of universes? And how do you kill a character made solely of energy? That’s always been the one that bothered me most about DC comics (that ‘Crisis on Infinite Earths’ resolution makes no sense!).

  • http://www.facebook.com/gerald.kirby.5 Gerald Kirby

    It would be really, REALLY nice if editors went back to editing and let the fraking creators create.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    How many of those listed are actually being used right now? Just because they exist doesn’t mean they exist in The New 52 or are actually used for stories.

    And I really, really have to disagree with you that John Stewart isn’t a fan favorite.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    Cyborg is on the cover of most Justice League comics in the New 52. Batwing has his own comic as well in the New 52. Steel was in the New 52 Action Comics, and there’s probably a ton more I missed. I’ll edit them in after I research the ones I haven’t skimmed through.

    As far as Jon Stewart, I didn’t say he wasn’t a fan favorite. I said he wasn’t a huge fan favorite, definitely not on the scale of Flash, Batman, Superman or Wonder Woman. Hawkgirl is arguable but I still think she has a bigger following. Either way all of those characters have far more definable traits to their personalities than Jon. Which is sad, because he had potential but it was wasted. And to put things in perspective, Peter Parker is dead. Characters die all of the time in comics. To boil it down to a matter of racism really short changes the artists responsible for these characters. And if Jon Stewart is or was your favorite character as a fan, then you owe more to the writers than that.

  • Anonymous

    It’s always like one step forward and two step backwards. They give titles to Katana and Vibe and then plan to kill off arguably their most high profile minority character. I mean Cyborg probably has a fair amount of recognition among teens due to the Titans cartoon from years ago but still.

    What a waste if they still plan on going through with this.

  • Anonymous

    I’m also of the mindset that if hell freezes over and the Justice League movie does get made, they should use John anyway. The Hal Jordan movie flopped and using John would avoid some of the stink associated with the brand and add a little diversity as well.

  • Anonymous

    As someone who didn’t follow either of those titles, can you expand more on that reasoning they provided? If everything originated on Earth, how do they explain the numerous other “older”/ancient/more advanced alien races shown throughout the DCU?

  • Anonymous

    What did they do to Wonder Woman? I only read her when she appeared in Batwoman.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Diana-OmegaSama-Davidsson/100000695823547 Diana OmegaSama Davidsson

    They changed her origin (she is now the daughter of Zeus and Hippolyta), made her an idiot who couldn’t even see what was going on in her own society (Amazons raping men, murdering them and selling of the male children as slaves), not standing up against sexist acts such as slaps on the butt and shit like that (which she used to do). To name a few.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    I don’t think I did “boil it down to racism.” John Stewart is a favorite character and I believe I’m actually giving the writers their due credit for not wanting to write this story.

  • Anonymous

    It’s always struck me that Earth figures disproportionately large in the DCU, considering that—as an actual race—we don’t really have space travel beyond the moon.

    I mean, sure, a small portion of humanity (or at least, a small portion of sentient life currently residing on Earth, anyway) travels not only off-planet but to distant stars on a semi-regular basis—and everyone knows this—but they haven’t really bothered to share any of that tech or knowledge with, say, NASA or the European Space Agency.

  • Anonymous

    I think that when the number of characters you have on hand of a minority group is that small, you should be aware of how that’s going to be perceived.

    This reminds me of what happened in Marvel where they introduced a gay character, Freedom Ring, Quesada touted him as an example of Marvel’s increased diversity, and then he was killed as an example of a new hero and how heroism doesn’t always mean a successful career within a month of Quesada’s discussion of him. Robert Kirman, who wrote the death storyline, later responded to the criticism, and later still, regretted killing the character because of the proportionality of gay characters to begin with:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_Ring#Robert_Kirkman_on_Freedom_Ring.27s_character

    I think Kirkman’s statement demonstrates how a decision may not be intentional, but that it’s the lack of awareness that’s the problem. He regretted killing the character because of what it ended up objectively doing in the Marvel Universe for readers, even though it seemed like a good story at the time.

    I think you can count the number of prominent black superheroes in the DCU on your hands: Cyborg, Vixen, Black Lightning, Jon Stewart, Static Shock, Steel. (I don’t count Batwing, because with the exception of seeing a cover with him on it and the context of this conversation, I would have no idea who we’re talking about, and he only appeared as of 2011). Even half of these characters I doubt are recognizable to the level of Stewart.

    Comparatively, the number of white superheroes is in the hundreds, and the prominent ones well outnumber the POCs. So yes, I would view killing Jon Stewart as removing a significant proportion of that representation, especially with how it looks from the “token” perspective within the GLC.

  • Thomas L. Strickland

    We cannot just think of comics as a single medium entity anymore. The superheroes and the stories around them spread through comic books, sure, but also through video games, movies, and especially television.

    Did you watch JLU, Gabriel? Brilliant series, especially once it took off and the writers realized just what the U stood for (Unlimited). And one of the cornerstones of that series was John Stewart, Green Lantern.

    All of those kids that wondered just why there was a white guy playing Green Lantern? They watched JLU. And they watched Static Shock as well. And while I will admit that Stewart’s mid-70s introduction was off-target, the character has developed into one of the most well-rounded in the DC canon. I’ve been a Hal Jordan fan since forever, but even I have to admit that Hal has suffered greatly from the ever-spinning DC plot twist machine. Stewart, on the other hand, has remained remarkably solid throughout his tenure and is probably the most relatable hero to wear a power ring.

    And if you cannot recognize his elimination as a kind of racism, then you have to admit that it smacks of foundered imagination on the part of meddling editors who no longer value story over the long term in favor of immediate shock and spectacle.

  • Thomas L. Strickland

    Also … Peter Parker? Not dead.

    He’s a blue glowie, à la Obi Wan Kenobi.

  • Anonymous

    But John Stewart and Static (Virgil’s superhero name is not “Static Shock”, that was the series!) are known *even to folks who aren’t big comic fans*. Largely due to their DC Animated Universe versions, which were seen by people who don’t otherwise read comics.

    And while I am given to understand Stewart in the original comics was not the most-rounded character, his DCAU portrayal was awesome. Which is (as the article notes) where many younger or less die-hard fans first encountered the concept of a “Green Lantern”, and so John Stewart—specifically his Justice League/Justice League Unlimited animated version—was *the* Green Lantern to many people.

    Keep in mind, basically, that many people aren’t particularly diehard comics fans, and so their awareness of a given publisher’s universe comes from movies or television. I guarantee you a lot of people think of the Marvel Cinematic Universe as the ‘canon’ version of those characters because it is *the only version they know*.

    That said, you’re right about Cyborg, because Teen Titans did get a fair amount of airtime. But Steel? Black Lightning? I think that’s a harder one to push. I mean, yeah, Steel showed up in the DCAU Superman series (and as a background character in Justice League Unlimited), but not enough to be prominent or recognizable to the average watcher. Similarly, Black Lightning wasn’t terribly prominently featured in any series, despite cameos in many. Although his daughters have now had their own DC Nation series of shorts!

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for the info. I had only heard of the parentage change and the Amazon society bits, but not about the rest, or Diana’s involvement with them.

  • http://twitter.com/TCC180 Adam Stachowiak

    I look at it more like they sealed off the infinite universes (I never actually read infinite earths… -_-), but even looking at it that way doesn’t work since they can still access alternate universes through hyper time. :/

  • Anonymous

    Seriously? Ugh, I figured that would happen…

  • Anonymous

    I still think the DCAU version of John Stewart is my favorite Green Lantern. Partly because Phil LaMarr is just awesome voicing that role.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    Valid point. His voice acting was indeed awesome.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    Obi Wan Kenobi died. But I do see the value in things that glow, so we’ll call this one a draw. And to the other guy that replied: Yeah, they weren’t going to keep him dead dead. It was pretty obvious they’d have him back in some glowy form or another.

  • Elisabeth Day

    Speaking of how DC is terrible, why is it that all FIVE Green Lanterns are dudes? Do Earth women not have willpower?

  • http://twitter.com/mypalsammy Sammy Younan -28-

    Superheroes much like Michael Jordan inspire by their unwavering dedication and bold actions. That’s why this fixation on minority heroes is irrelevant and has no genuine merit, inspiration always transcends the status quo. That’s what made Jordan so infectious and John Stewart so boring. Stewart contributes nothing, I agree with the other criticisms in previous comments, he’s as flat as 2 week old soda, Inspire or get out. Put Stewart into the ground, now and then let’s see what this GL can do, take him out for a spin, see what kind of potential and play he’s got.

  • Elisabeth Day

    But of those available, John Stewart is clearly the best. Hal is a douche, Kyle can’t breathe in the general direction of a woman without her being slammed into the refrigerator, and Guy only works in a very specific context (by which I mean JLI). The new guy I don’t really know much about other than ‘ZOMG, a Green Lantern that uses guns!!!!’

    John Stewart is an ex-marine and an architect. He’s a total badass and he doesn’t make giant green boxing gloves; when he constructs something you can be sure it’s intricate and structurally sound.

  • Robert Davis

    Editors wanting to be ‘superstars’ has been the reason many of the creators and artists have been leaving these comics. Guess they look back at Stan Lee and others and ‘want that’ — forgetting the many decades of creating, writing, etc. that someone like Stan had to ‘do’ to get to be such a superstar. As a rule, editors do not ‘make’ successful characters or stories — the writers and artists do.

  • http://twitter.com/HoneyvonBuren Andrea Alba

    “A big part of that popularity can be attributed to Stewart’s starring role in the DC animated universe, where a whole generation grew up thinking he was THE Green Lantern. So much so many wanted to know who that white guy was in the movie starring Ryan Reynolds. I’m not over exaggerating.”

    So true omg. Back when the Green Lantern movie came out, I wasn’t into comic books, so I was really pissed because I didn’t understand why was Green Lantern a white dude I didn’t know and not my badass black Green Lantern from the animated series I grew up watching. My friends were confused as well until someone explained Hal Jordan to us and even though we weren’t confused anymore, I was still upset because I liked John Stewart way more.

    I wish I could say I am surprised they’re killing such an awesome character, but then again, they just killed Damian, so… I don’t know what’s up with DC and their stupid decisions.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    Okay, next reply. God, you guys really do rally against differing view points…

    Here we go,
    First off: No one ever mentioned comics being a single medium, but this article is specifying something occurring in the comic, not film or television so I only brought up comic related points.

    Second: Yes Thomas, I have seen it, several times. It was amazing.

    Third: Unlimited? I thought it was for Uverse and DC had just sold out even more.

    Fourth: Yes, a lot of kids did watch the Justice League cartoons and I’m sure watching Deadpool play him probably confused and frightened their brain stems. I don’t see how that’s relevant really, but yes. Children are easily confused.

    Fifth: Jon Stewart is indeed solid. We can agree on that without debate. Solid. Rock-like. Sturdy. Stationary even at times. As far as a personality goes, that’s about it for me. Maybe you’ve seen the softer side of the sears lantern but I just don’t. And I’m not entirely alone in that thought process.

    Sixth: (concerning the racism) I have to admit no such thing. As a matter of fact upon reading that I simply stopped because I already disagreed.

    Seventh: Just finished reading it. Still disagree. Comics are constantly looking for shock value. All mediums are because that’s what drives sales now. Why do you think Jersey Shore is popular? The mental stimulation and in depth character arcs? Maybe. I don’t know, I’ve never seen it. The point is, there will always be shock value to consider, but if it also goes to serve the story line or to enrich the reading experience, then it has purpose. And if you cannot recognize his death as at least a possible progression of a more valid and otherwise fulfilling story arc, then you have to admit that at the very least it got people talking.

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    Killer Croc’s no. 3, right?
    And Black Vulcan is no. 4, meaning Lightning must be no. 5. Hm.

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    GG works fine on GLTAS. Kyle’s fridge problems are clearly overrated, but yeah. JS is the man.

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    If Earth Prime dies, it’d kill the infinite (well, 52) multiverse Earths too.

    The Earth sector has so many GL’s because it’s constantly under threats of one form or another; pretty sure this was stated before Geoff even began his turn-to-junk run.

    The being made of energy’d turn into more energy of a different form.. I think?

  • Anonymous

    This is some bullshit. You are so right about John being *the* Green Lantern. The Saturday morning cartoons led me to believe he was the only legit GL there ever was. How frustrating it is to be a black fan these days. And how sad for DC that they are/were ever considering throwing him away in comic form.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    Damn good point. DC isn’t the worst offender out there by a long shot, but the Green Lantern thing always got to me. It seems like for years they only had females as sexual counter parts to the males and with a group like the Green Lantern Corps you would think at least one female from Earth would have gotten through. But, then again, she’d probably just be a scantily clad version of Kyle or Hal. -.-

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    Summing up Brightest Day here for Ruminum:

    Eons ago, Nekron/the Black Lantern’s entity caused the birth of an opposite entity, the White.

    When the White spontaneously arrived that moment created the Big Bang, more or less, and its exact appearance caused Earth to begin.

    Due to the White’s appearance, the 7 ROYGBIV’s of Geoff John’s idiocy were born, resulting in emotion across the Universe.

    Thus, Earth was born first, but it didn’t develop /before/ all the other planets, but it became a nexus for all reality, etc etc etc.

    Course, that was before Barry Allen pulled a boner and destroyed everything…

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    It wasn’t Editorial that killed Damian, that was Grant Morrison’s plan for him the entire time. Go back and read that big hint at the end of his very first appearance: he blows up, for God’ssakes!

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    There’s plenty of Chick Lanterns, just none from Earth, check out Arisia and Boodika (course, pre-retcon, Arisia was a 12 year old who used her ring’s willpower to turn her into an adult to bang Hal…so…)

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    None of the female GL’s are scantily clad….

  • http://www.facebook.com/KozmikPariah Ryan Colson

    Before JL/U, Hal was *the* GL on Superfriends and that shitty live action comedy sketch show with Batman (played by West!) telling Grundy “he looks like he has an honest face” lol

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    It was a joke. Don’t worry about it, I’ll edit in a definition later.

  • Anonymous

    I think you boiling down the diversity of DC’s roster to just pure numbers 1) doesn’t hold when you look at all the numbers, and 2) doesn’t take into account the questionable depiction of many of these black characters, which has been fairly spotty over the years.

    Using your Wikipedia list, you can see that the first “boom” in black characters took place in the seventies. This was not a coincidence as Movies, Television, and Comics all jumped on the Blaxploitation bandwagon as numerous properties in this genre became cross-over hits. However, writers were often tone-deaf in their depiction of black characters, writing them as one-note stereotypes whose sole purpose in the DC universe was to be “the exotic black voice” who would talk in exaggerated slang, curse “whitey,” and provide a “street-level” view of the world of gangs and drugs. Even John Stewart was a victim of this lazy characterization in his early days.

    The ’80s and ’90s saw a more diverse cast of black characters, but they generally had limited runs and were confined to being background characters and sidekicks. Only a small handful were given an opportunity to break through into the pantheon of major heroes. Despite this diversification, writers and editors were still uncomfortable with finding ways to fit these characters into the larger DC universe in an organic way. Connor Hawke, for instance, was a multiracial character who was the son of Oliver Queen and took up the mantle of Green Arrow. Over the years artists began to anglicize his features from half-white, quarter-Black, quarter-Korean into a purely Anglo-European look. And the percentage of black characters in the DC universe who originated in “the projects” or came out of a gang background is a little alarming. And if you weren’t from a gang, chances are you were a scantily-clad African King or Queen from a generic African nation.

    Unfortunately, a common way that DC and Marvel have decided to diversify their rosters nowadays is by passing over original creations altogether and instead turn the latest versions of whatever heroes they have into black characters. The fallout is that these newer version are just about always temporary replacements, expendable when it’s time for their predecessors to make a triumphant return in whatever event comic is releasing next month. Even Stewart, one of DC’s oldest black heroes, is apparently not immune to this.

  • Anonymous

    Chick Lanterns? There are baby chickens as Lanterns? That’s awesome!

  • http://www.facebook.com/ZaineMasters Gabriel Sj

    Just replying to this one because it was the most recent reply to my apparently controversial view point of not agreeing with everything whoever wrote the article says forever.

    I’ll edit in something witty and post references to whatever later on. Honestly I haven’t even read this one yet. I’m far too tired for that. So set down the keyboards, step away, have whatever hip new coffee you kids drink nowadays, and when I come back I will properly reply to all of you.

  • Anonymous

    “Suppose they had a comic book company, and nobody came?”

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think it’s so much “rally against differing viewpoints” as that your initial phrasing stated that “Jon Stewart really wasn’t a huge favorite in the fans eyes.” You could easily say *you* didn’t like him or have a problem with it, but your initial phrasing made it sound more like a statement of fact—”no one likes John Stewart”—rather than an opinion, like “I don’t really care for John Stewart.”

    That’s kind of going to goad anyone who disagrees into showing why this *isn’t* a fact. And, y’know, this is fandom on the Internet; everyone has an opinion, and once invited to share that opinion will likely do so. Quite possibly at length and volume. ;)

    Clearly, many fans—including a lot of us on this site—are quite fond of Stewart, some even considering him our favorite of Earth’s Lanterns. (Probably, as I said elsewhere in the thread, largely due to Phil LaMarr’s superb portrayal of Stewart in the DC Animated Universe.) Whether it was the intent or not, your statement about fans not liking Stewart can thus come across as “if you like him, you are no true fan.”

    And I suspect that interpretation, erroneous or not, may be why you’re receiving a lot of responses. ;)

  • Anonymous

    Be fair, now. Hal is not a douche 100% of the time; there are swaths of continuity where he doesn’t have the *personality depth* to achieve any notable douchery, primarily because during such times he could be replaced by a cardboard comic-shop standee and no one would notice.

  • Anonymous

    (Disclaimer: I really don’t like Hal. Other’s opinions may differ, but mine makes for funnier comments.) ;)

  • Anonymous

    I only contribute to this space in comments, therefore I do not want to speak for the lovely people who actually run The Mary Sue. But I do wish to say that of all the places on the internet that talk of geek culture, I feel this is one of the more inclusive spaces. The viewpoints you have brought here, Gabriel, are those of non-inclusive viewpoints, which is shared by our society as a whole. These viewpoints are ways of oppression, ways to silence others, ways to tell them that they aren’t really as important as straight, white able-bodied man, ways to paper cut them with words, attitudes, and dismissal. Yes, if DC kills off John Stewart, race will be a factor. And it is sad (and sickening, and enraging) that this same attitude, this same dismissal, this same pattern of events (kill off the minorty, etc) continues. It is cruel that the ones who are affected the most are the ones to say something, instead of the ones who keep perpetuating the stereotype to just…stop.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks!

  • TKS

    Out of curiosity, who do you think IS the worst offender out there?

  • protoformX

    I disagree with your argument, maybe you found Stewart boring, maybe there are many who feel the same way. And I’m willing to believe that there are possibly a whole lot more people than I could imagine out there that would rank him low in a poll of favorite Green Lanterns. You are totally entitled to your opinion. And I don’t want to get into a dispute over what handful of easily recognizable not white characters there are, especially for anyone as a relative newcomer to comics. I don’t think you can assume everyone knows who the hell Vibe, Vixen, Gypsy and the assorted other characters the DC universe has forgotten about over the last dozen reboots/retcons/parallel universe intertwining sagas. If you are coming into a medium who’s whole basis you know from what has been represented elsewhere to entice you to check out comics, then you probably do only know Stewart from JL, Static from Static Shock, Cyborg from Teen Titans, however you spell his name Aqualad from Young Justice, Bumblebee, and Steel (hopefully not the Shaq movie version). How many of those characters are prominently shown in this new universe, or even past ones. How do they know where to go to find them… but at least there is a strong chance Stewart will show up in some capacity in JLA, GL, GL Corps. Do you really want to say eh Vic Stone is enough go to JLA.

    Anyway that was a long freaking paragraph to give me an excuse to not just post a correction regarding the fact that Jon Stewart hosts The Daily Show and does not wield a ring of power (as far as I know), but John Stewart does.

  • Not So Young Democrat

    Killer Croc is black? That may be even less obvious than Mister Bones being black.

  • Not So Young Democrat

    Yeah I think Cyborg and Steel are probably more prominent African American characters at least within the comics themselves.

  • http://twitter.com/MelissiaKuromoi Melissia

    Wow, they’ve lost a lot of big names in the last year or so.

    And yet they’re still keeping Rob Liefeld?

  • Anonymous

    I’m probably showing my age (lack of age? lol), but the cartoon I was talking about was 2001 Justice League which was John.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    I thought Liefeld left as well.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    Is Steel even still around in the nu52?

  • cameron crooks

    Sounds horrible! What the heck is going on over there?!

  • Anonymous

    Well the universes in Crisis on Infinite Earths were destroyed by an advancing white wall of energy. If that wall was itself infinite it could destroy all universes (weird mathematical concept: all infinities are not equal). Alternatively, that wall is STILL destroying all universes in the pre-Crisis multiverse.

    As for your second question: Superman was just that awesome. HE PUNCHED OUT AN ANTI-MATTER ENERGY BEING. (It was also implied the Anti-Monitor couldn’t survive long outside of his armor.)

  • Anonymous

    JS was badass, he was so awesome on JLU. He’ll always be my favorite. Smart, silent, and had integrity, so cool.

  • Anonymous

    I suspect Jon Stewart does indeed have a ring of power, but I haven’t yet figured out which Lantern Corps powers the Daily Show.

  • Anonymous

    JS was one of my favorite characters on the animated show, though I didn’t read the comics, so Idk how he was there. But he was smart and had such integrity and restraint on the show, I just loved him

  • Anonymous

    Love, Love, Loved him in JLU. I can’t stand Hal Jordan.
    Static Shock was an awesome show, but I was very disappointed in the New 52 version. The writing was just really poor.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, Yes, Yes.
    Also: Yes

  • http://twitter.com/Lyta1418 Jo Reis

    although I am against killing John Stewart, no character stays dead in comics anyway, every time I hear someone say that this or that character will die in comics I yawn. I’m tired of “kill” characters, no longer has no impact. John is more popular than the other (which I can not remember the name and do not care enough to “google” his name, I just know that was the same that DC “killed” after they made ​​him a villain in decade with 90 with name as medicament: Paralax …)

  • http://twitter.com/AbelUndercity Abel Undercity

    It’s called “disagreeing.” It happens. Welcome to the internet.

  • http://twitter.com/Totz_the_Plaid Totz_the_Plaid

    Wait… I know she doesn’t use Green Lantern as her code name, but I thought Jade was part of the Corps as well…

  • http://twitter.com/Totz_the_Plaid Totz_the_Plaid

    I wasn’t aware the Chicago Bulls were a DC comics superhero team…

  • http://twitter.com/Totz_the_Plaid Totz_the_Plaid

    Yeah, Killer Croc is actually black. It was more obvious in his early appearances, but through a combination of continuing mutation from his birth defect and artistic stylization, he’s looked more reptilian than any recognizable natural skin tone for a long time now.

    http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20111018213210/batman/images/9/95/1573864-killercroc3.jpg

    I think that’s the closest the comics have ever come to showing him as his actual supposed race.

    Honestly, though, while he’s technically an Afro-American character, it’s hard to count him due to the fact that such info is pretty darn obscure.

    Also, he’s a villain, so he wouldn’t be number 3 on the list since they were talking about heroes.

  • http://twitter.com/Totz_the_Plaid Totz_the_Plaid

    Speaking of killing off minority characters, does anyone remember the time that Marvel killed Northstar off in multiple titles in the core (Earth-616) universe in the same month?

    What a mess that was, continuity-wise…

  • Brian

    Come on, his name is Waylon Jones. Honestly.

  • Brian

    You know, just because people disagree with you is no reason to turn into a petty crabapple. Pardon my language.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alissa-Knyazeva/100000197242034 Alissa Knyazeva

    The story-telling on the Wonder Woman is fantastic. Modern take on the Greek gods, etc. The pacing is beautiful, and it’s just a really tight story. But the re-working of WW’s character is really unacceptable.

    I heard that the writer actually pitched a “Greek epic” to the DC editorial, with no intention of writing a WW story. DC editorial liked it a lot, but said it needs more Wonder Woman (since she’s like, Greek or something, right?), so the story was re-written to include WW, which it did not have before.

    Kind of explains the uh, “liberties” taken with the character.

  • Anonymous

    Why isn’t there an Eskimo green lantern?

    Or a Filipino green lantern?

    And a gay midget green lantern?

    DC is very racist!

  • Nick Gaston

    Hell, if they were creating the character entirely anew anyway, why not make the Simon Baz lantern a woman?

    Unless they were just chasing a demographic…and they thought making that particular ethnicity’s character female would kill it off as a customer base… 8o

  • http://twitter.com/Deggsy Deggsy

    You see, this is why I stick with Marvel, it has a much more diverse cast of prominent characters of colour for its movies, like, uh… um.. Nick Fury… and Storm.

  • Adam R. Charpentier

    Daffy Duck was a Lantern for five seconds once, so maybe…

  • Adam R. Charpentier

    Too bad, because the horror/Harryhausen vibe they’ve given the title is the most interesting it’s been in years.

  • Adam R. Charpentier

    Why does Earth need five Green Lanterns? Isn’t the GL supposed to be sort of a lone ranger in his or her sector? Guy Gardener should go back to Sinestro’s ring, Hal Jordan should go back to being dead, and…hey, what happened to Jade? Is Jade dead?

  • Not So Young Democrat

    Yes. If nothing else he appeared in the Rotworld storyline in Animal Man and Swamp Thing where he was one of the few superheroes left after Anton Arcane took over the world.

  • http://twitter.com/TraylorAlan Alan Traylor

    Three white GLs, one African-American and one Arab-American. And five Americans. How about a female GL? How about a female from Malaysia? How about a South African GL? Russian? Wild idea: a North Korean GL who dismantles that regime. Why is it that America still = Earth in comics?

    Here’s an idea, DC: retire Jordan, kill Rayner, keep Gardner for comic relief. Make Stewart the prime GL. Keep Baz. Add a Japanese woman. Add an Italian. It’s time to put American parochialism aside in comics. The world is so much more diverse and interesting.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ashe.samuels Ashe P. Samuels

    You sure are sad people are disagreeing with you. It sucks sometimes, but you could just learn something from all these dissenting opinions.

    Or, er, ‘rallying’, as you call it.

  • Not So Young Democrat

    I don’t think I’d use “blaxploitation” to refer to all of this boom. While some of the products clearly fall into the blaxploitation genre (I’m looking at you Luke Cage) others don’t so well, especially on tv where it would be hard to characterize things like, say, The Jeffersons as “blaxploitation”. It’s also the case that the 1970s saw a wider willingness to look beyond Anglo-Saxon characters in terms of pop culture. This was the era of The Godfather and The Deer Hunter which showed, even among white Americans, that the generic WASP vision of whiteness wasn’t all there was. Of course one other difference between blaxploitation films and the emergence of African-American characters on tv and in comics is that a lot of blaxploitation films were created BY African-Americans whereas most of the creators in comics, and on tv, tended to be white.

    I also think it’s important to look at these things partly in the context of their time. As you say, a lot of the representations come off as pretty ham handed today, and would have seemed so even then, but I think that these were genuine attempts by creators to do something positive: expand the diversity of their cast of characters and perhaps appeal more to non-white consumers.

    I’m also not sure about the assertion of “the projects” and “African Queen” as defining black characters anymore. Both because I’m not sure that that’s true anymore and because I think the reaction to that can be taken too far. It’s important to show a diversity of African-American life so when EVERY character is has some kind of gang member connection it’s problematic. But at the same time I think you can take the reaction too far against this and go too far the other way. There can develop a notion that being “from the projects” (which I read as “urban”) is something shameful or that should be avoided in portrayals of African-Americans. And I think that ends up marginalizing people whose reality IS urban. I couldn’t easily find good stats on the percentage of African-Americans who live in cities but about half of African Americans rent rather than own their homes in the 2010 census, and that’s probably somewhat of a proxy for urban life and it’s true that most American cities are disproportionately African-American. Static has already been mentioned here and I think it’s instructive to remember that he was created, much like Spiderman, as a very quintessentially urban hero. Most of the Milestone Universe, which was created mostly by African-American creators, was urban in nature although it included everything from gang members to millionaires.

  • Anonymous

    Big fat whoopsy-doopsy on that change to her origins; I never believed that she was animated from a lump of clay, and neither should anybody else believe that (I also believe that Xena was the daughter of Ares by the way that she and Area would tangle with him-it seemed to me that they had a deeper connection.) The story has not been the standard ‘superhero is good and upstanding and saves the world’ but a complex story about Zeus’s philandering having wide repercussions for the Greek gods and Earth as a whole, and I like that a lot (as do most critics.)

  • Anonymous

    Nothing wrong with it at all.

  • Anonymous

    Green Lantern was always a white dude, Stewart (plus Gardner and Rayner) were added as back-up. The reason everybody wanted Stewart was due to the popularity of the Justice League/Justice League Unlimited show, but that doesn’t and shouldn’t mean that Hal Jordan should be left behind and not used-after all, he (and Alan Scott) were the original Green Lanterns of the title. What was DC/Warner’s supposed to do, just piss on tradition because a more popular version of said character was used? That would be douchbaggery equal to what people are objecting to now-and a spit in the face to the long-time fans of the character who’d grown up reading Green Lantern before you.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, the ’70s saw an increase in diversity in popular entertainment in general, that’s not in dispute. The issue is how those characters were depicted. Blaxploitation films were the trendiest and most popular product in media starring primarily ethnic casts at the time, and as such influenced more popular media than any other ethnically driven genre (sitcoms like The Jeffersons, Good Times, Benson, Sanford and Sons, etc didn’t have the cultural cache that Blaxploitation films had in influencing other pop culture media forms, and their influence could be felt mostly in their own platform, television, while Blaxploitation films influenced movies, television, comics, literature, fashion, music – “The Theme from Shaft” won an Oscar for goodness sakes, and the persistent fascination with “ethnic cool” and street culture was behind “It’s Hard out Here for a Pimp” taking home the same award 34 years later. WTF.).

    The result was that writers in comics (almost exclusively white males with little to no first hand knowledge of black culture outside of what they saw on tv and in films – which today is echoed in foreign cultures that see little of African-American life outside of Hip Hop videos, movies, and athletics) drew their inspiration from these exaggerated characters and stories. This is why a large proportion of black characters from that period had origins on the streets, in projects, and in gangs. While gangs, drugs, and poor neighborhoods were a reality for many blacks, it wasn’t a reality for many others, including my parents and their parents. The lack of diversity in the backgrounds of these jive-talking, authority-hating characters is what was most damaging as it was contributing to the misconception that the African-American experience could be boiled down to drugs, gangs, ghettos, and a deep-seeded hatred of “whitey.” Even heroes like John Stewart were characterized by attributes that would both intrigue and scare white readers – he was a powerful, hip, street-wise dude who didn’t like you if your skin was white. That kind of characterization keeps audiences at a distance and prevents them from fully embracing a hero that is so racially charged.

    Writers cannot be given a pass for their lack of knowledge. It would have cost them nothing to read a few books, listen to a few lectures, or even to diversify the media that they were consuming in order to create more realistic, three-dimensional ethnic characters in their books. Ignorance and naivete can be just as harmful as malicious intent.

    As for “the projects” and the “African Queen/King” being defining characteristics, the unfortunate truth is that they still are for a surprisingly large percentage of black superheroes and comic characters. In fact, the most well-known black heroes today, Black Panther (African King), Storm (African Queen/Goddess), Luke Cage (Streetwise Ex-con), etc. still fall into these tropes. And there is a difference between “urban” and “the projects/ghetto,” which is why the popular usage of “urban” as shorthand for “black” or “ghetto” is problematic. There can and should be plenty of urban black heroes, but that doesn’t mean they should all be from the hood and talk slang. Plenty of middle-class blacks live an urban experience in large cities with good jobs, nice families, and don’t spend their time running with gangs on the street like many of these characters from the seventies. I hope we can see more diversity in this regard because that would truly be an accurate representation of real life. Taking a character like John Stewart, who has had to overcome that questionable early existence, only takes us all a step backwards.

  • Anonymous

    John Stewart may be badass, and a great Green Lantern to you, but Hal Jordan was first, and using him in the movie was a nod to tradition. That doesn’t excuse DC’s attempting to get rid of John Stewart, mind you, but it is a good thing good thing that they just didn’t throw Jordan away simply to impress fans of ‘the new guy’.

  • Anonymous

    Pissing on the original character in favor of the new one would be and is a dick move expected of executives with no history-ask fans of Star Trek how that feels. A new Green Lantern movie franchise should be made first that features both Jordan and Stewart in two separate movies, with both building up to become part of the Justice League (one as back-up in case the other one has to be put on deep-space duty as per Guardian requirements.) I don’t see why one has to be sacrificed for the other just because one of them was more popular.

  • Anonymous

    The Katana and Vibe books aren’t even selling. They got a lot of hype and then the debut issues stiffed. Meanwhile, John Stewart, a POC featured in a fondly remembered cartoon, is supposed to be killed off…why, exactly?

  • Anonymous

    Yeah, I know Hal was the first. I’ve been delving into the comics lately, though, and I have no interest in him. He’s kind of a douche. And the movie turned out terrible anyway. I honestly think that part of that was the use of Hal, who’s really just not compelling, imo. The other part, of course, was the bad CGI and the poor script.

  • Anonymous

    I managed to get over the “Zeus, you ARE the father” thing, but the male raping, and killing, and selling of male children for weapons WITHOUT Diana knowing about it was total bullshit. If this was standard practice among the amazons and considered necessary to their survival, then why would it be a secret to their potential future leader? I’m hoping this is somehow undone somewhere down the line. It’s too bad because there are other parts to the story so far that have been very well written, and I also REALLY enjoy Cliff Chiang’s artwork.

  • Anonymous

    John may have been poorly received in the 70′s, but in the 00′s he was definitely a fan favorite, largely because of the animated series. As far as that representation was concerned, he was anything but bland and emotionless. John was an essential part of the team. He was strong and decisive, and had tons of attitude – if those aren’t “defining characteristics” then I don’t know what is. Also, posting a comparatively short list of black characters alone proves/means nothing in terms of “representation” in the DCU. What counts is HOW they were used and what they represented. Yes, there are a few great characters there (Vixen, Steele, Black Lightning), but quite a few of them were mere tokens, and an even fewer number of them like “Nubia”, and “Calvin Ellis” – the Wonder Woman and Superman of Earth 23 were nothing more than “alternate” or “temporary” versions of the “BIG” heroes.

  • Anonymous

    His being a dick should have zero to no bearing on him being the main character who is Green Lantern. It’s time to face facts and not fantasies as to who is Green Lantern (and I’m saying this as a long-time fan of comic books who’s an Afro-Canadian male.) What DC was to has done before the opposition to it was a dick move to be sure, but it would be even more of a dick move to destroy Hal Jordan in favor of John Stewart simply because Stewart was in a recent popular TV series.

  • Anonymous

    …you do know he’s not a real person, right? If he’s an uninteresting jerk, then sure that makes a difference! We can cancel him. But he’s popular enough that shouldn’t be a problem. I just want us to have both.

  • Anonymous

    If we’re just going with movies, I think you have to at least include James Rhodes/War Machine, too.

  • Anonymous

    Hey, it could happen, I suppose.

  • http://twitter.com/Deggsy Deggsy

    True enough, I forgot about him. I could watch a War Machine spin-off movie :-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/jamie.jeans Jamie Jeans

    The good news is that, thanks to all of you, and many others, saying what BS this is, DC Comics is apparently NOT going to kill off John Stewart…

    Which is good, because in a way, it’s like pissing all over Dwayne McDuffie’s legacy in much the same way as DC did when they killed off Big Barda to give Mr. Miracle angst, and she was found dead in the kitchen of their home.

    Yes, Dwayne McDuffie may not have created John Stewart, but he pushed him front and center, building off of previous authours and becoming synonymous with the character. Most people outside of comics that think of Green Lantern think of John Stewart, a black man, which is phenomenal, considering the history of white guys that DC Comics has had of pushing to be their number 1 guys.

    It’s like… all of a sudden, a long-lasting character’s default is no longer white… but BLACK, and not just in the eyes of us older fans, but little kids too. Kids today STILL think of Green Lantern as BLACK.

    How often in our pulp culture has that happened, where a white character’s legacy has literally changed colours in the eyes of us, the consumers, and we don’t question it?

    (Aside from the racist neckbeards, that is… Dwayne had to deal with more than one of them, that’s for sure.)

    And DC’s response?

    Kill him off, and restore the status quo. White Makes Right.

    Well, just like how we stood up and told DC Comics we’re not buying that Superman Anthology so long as that homophobic underwear streak stain on humanity, Orson Scott Card, was going to be working on it, we’re telling DC Comics now, as consumers, that we’re NOT going to put up with this bullshit.

    Because WE are the consumers, WE have the money, and we have the power, and we won’t stand for this shit.

  • http://twitter.com/HoneyvonBuren Andrea Alba

    I never said they should have done that?? When somebody explained it to me, it made total sense and I understood. But I still felt upset because… I’m allowed to be?? I’m not criticizing DC for going with Jordan instead of Stewart, I was just confirming Jill’s point that, yes, a lot of people were confused when the movie came out and I explained my experience to kind of justify why killing him in the comics is the stupidest decision they can make. In any case, I’m still up for the Green Lantern reboot WITH JORDAN as long as they make it right. I wasn’t whining over the fact they didn’t go with Stewart 8/ Sorry if you misunderstood. I’m okay with Hal and everything, not like I dislike him.

  • http://twitter.com/HoneyvonBuren Andrea Alba

    Okay, Okay. I’ll blame Grant Morrison for that, and not DC.

  • http://twitter.com/HoneyvonBuren Andrea Alba

    I know right :’) I agree 100%

  • George B.

    So, did this entire story come from rumors on social media and speculation on what might be the reason for these guys leaving? Some shoddy ‘journalism’ there… Jill, you are a big enough name in these circles to get something else to go on.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    Now that I’m reading BoP, I’m kinda sad they went with Katana and not Starling. It’s personal preference, but stoic avenging characters never appealed to me all that much. Starling, though–I’d read about her beating people up all day.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    What’s with this “destroy” concept? It didn’t destroy Jordan for them to use Stewart in the JLU. If they’d wanted to nod toward tradition while also making a movie more in touch with what the larger, non-comic-reading audience knew of the Green Lantern, they would have done just that–nodded toward it. Included a reference to Jordan, or an actual character by that name. Maybe even gone so far as to not make Stewart the first Green Lantern from Earth, but the latest in a brotherhood. That’s how you nod to tradition. You can’t use responsibly tradition as an excuse when making a Hollywood blockbuster, because the larger part of your audience doesn’t know it or care about it.

    Y’know who was THE Green Lantern? Alan Scott. Also, we’re talking about comics–the facts ARE fantasies. “Who” the Green Lantern is depends on who has the hearts and minds of the fans. Just because something was important in the Silver Age doesn’t mean it deserves to be the main course today. Lookit Barry Allen. Yeah, we all know he was the second Flash, and the big guy for the Silver Age, but it sure doesn’t make him a character people want to read about.

    Not pushing a character into the limelight just because he was FIRST (second) isn’t the same as destroying them or throwing them away.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    “Piss on tradition.”

    Dude. This isn’t Anatevka. Calm down.

  • http://nerdofalltrades.tumblr.com/ Angry And Yellow

    I think that DC has to be very careful right now. First they relaunched their books and took a lot of (justified) criticism for the way they portrayed their female characters (I’m looking at you Starfire and Catwoman), then they fired and re-hired one of their few female writers, then they brought in a guy that is openly hostile to gays to write for Superman, and now we hear they were going to kill their most popular Black character. DC is in danger of appearing/being hostile to minorities which, last I checked, was bad for business. Meanwhile, Marvel has made Nick Fury Black, had a gay, inter-racial marriage, and has a Black Spider-Man in their Ultimate Universe. If DC was smart, they’d promote John Stewart, relaunch the Green Lantern fim with him, and make him apart of the Justice League movie.

  • Mr The Batman

    I’m still amazed there are 5 Lanterns on Earth. Though I do agree that a female GL, on Earth, wouldn’t be difficult to do at all.

    Personally speaking, I’d say kill of Hal Jordan.

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    The distinct problem here is that most (but really all) of the things being done in the story could’ve been achieved without making the Amazons mass-murdering aholes and giving Diana daddy issues.

  • Anonymous

    Jade was made a Green Lantern for a while during Kyle’s series when her natural powers went dormant. She was the first female GL of Earth. However, as of the New 52 reboot, she doesn’t exist since her dad, Alan Scott, is being revamped in the Earth-2 series.

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    I have one thing I kinda have to say and I’m totally going to be That Guy but it’s driving me crazy:

    He’s just Static. “Static Shock” is the cartoon and later it was the title on some of the comics to capitalize on that recognition. But the character’s name is simply “Static” (as was the title of the original Milestone comic).

    And he is awesome. (Not that that was being debated.)

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    I feel like most of the issues come from this weird Silver-Age-restoration-filtered-through-the-90s thing DC is doing. I appreciate the legacy of comics but Barry Allen & Hal Jordan have always been just kinda…blah for me. Not that they can’t be interesting but I haven’t seem much personality from them outside of the DCAU/movies. And part of it is my gateway comic was New (Teen) Titans – I saw Nightwing on a cover, realized he was Robin (who I loved from the 60s tv series) and proceeded to but every issue I could find of the run. So I loved all the “sidekicks” and then seeing them grow up and achieve on their own was awesome. They created their own ways or took on the mantles of their predecessors and honored them. And that made them much more interesting characters to me. So Wally is *my* Flash. I appreciate Barry but I do so through Wally’s eyes. Same goes for Hal – I started reading books a little after that Parallax business was going on. Even though I got some back issues and read stuff with Hal, I still appreciated him more through the eyes of all the other characters who mourned him.

    I don’t think the movies should steamroll details from the comics but I also think movies/tv shows need to do what will result in the best stories and work best on the big screen. Sure, a giant emerald construct of a Hot Wheels Loop-de-Loop was kinda cool but, based on John Stewart architecture/military background, his would be much more visually interesting. Same goes for Kyle Rayner who is an artist.

  • Anonymous

    Excuse me, but this is a classic character that’s been around longer than you or I. Grow the frack up, accept DC’s apology for what happened, and stop acting like a big baby denied its bottle.

  • Anonymous

    No solo series. Portrayals as supporting players within their respective “families.” Your definition of “prominence” doesn’t hold up.

  • Anonymous

    what world is this?

  • http://twitter.com/Totz_the_Plaid Totz_the_Plaid

    Oh, right. I keep forgetting about the shittiness that is the New 52 since I’ve pretty much stopped actually reading new stuff from Marvel and DC.

    Shame. Despite the art of her often being played for sex appeal, she was a neat character.

  • Shae

    I grew up with John Stewart from the DC animated universe and I still remember being really mad when I saw other things from DC that came out and didn’t have him, but Hal Jordan instead. I couldn’t figure out why they’d replaced John with a guy whose name I didn’t even know. All I knew was he wasn’t my green lantern and before I got into the actual comics, I didn’t know there could be more than one human green lantern. I’m really glad that it looks like DC has backed off of this decision, because out of all the horrible ones they’ve made in the past years (reboot in particular) this would have been one of the worst, if not THE worst.

  • Anonymous

    What’s wrong with a hero (female or male) having issues with their parents? That would be considered great characterization by many people (and in fact was a part of the makeup of Tony Stark/Iron Man, IIRC.) As I said above, it would be hard for people today to believe that Diana was made from a lump of clay.

  • Anonymous

    Your treatment of the previous Green Lanterns is no better than what DC comics did and shows a noticeable lack of history and anything that isn’t recent and ‘kewl’.

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    There isn’t a problem with having familial issues but I fail to see how Diana being made out of clay isn’t believable considering Greek myth is chalk full of stories where the gods turn people into objects & animals and vice versa. The story of Pygmalion is essentially about a statue that was turned into a real woman (and has been the basis of A LOT of other stories). This is a spin on that.

    I have a distinct problem when anyone says any origin isn’t believable in a universe where there is a giant space-starfish that spawns tinier versions of itself that suction to people’s faces and subjugate them to its will in order to take over planets. Believability is relative to the quality of storytelling.

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    Liefeld left in a spectacular blaze of glory (or infamy…or both).

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    Btw, Xena is *not* Ares’ daughter. He was the embodiment of temptation since he was always trying to get her to go back to her bloody warlord ways. Also he was a mentor of sorts – haven’t watched in awhile but I believe her aptitude for violence and beauty caused him to take personal interest in her – and he loved her in a non-familial way. While I know that’s not odd for standard Greek myth, it wasn’t something they were exploring on the show.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe not for you, but there are still people who love all of the previous holders of the Green Lantern ring on Earth, and would be just as angry as you are because of this incident. If you don’t like Hal Jordan, Alan Scott, Guy Gardner, or Kyle Rayner, you’re free to do so, but doing this would still be wrong. If you feel that DC should deal with its minority characters better, then you and everybody else here should be able to convey that without calling for the previous characters to be destroyed in favor of John Stewart.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t care if he’s a jerk or not, he’s a valid character, and he’s a hell of a lot more valid than a character that was flawed and inconsistent in his execution in the comics but was fixed in the animated series that he was featured in. And yes, you are right, we can have both, But Hal Jordan is still a great hero, in spite of his faults. Otherwise, he’d be boring as fuck.

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    “…a character that was flawed and inconsistent in his execution in the
    comics but was fixed in the animated series that he was featured in…”

    You’ve just described about 80-90% of the characters featured in the DCAU.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    Dude. You aren’t making any sense now. Literally.

    Firstly, let’s reiterate my point: “Not pushing a character into the limelight isn’t the same as destroying them or throwing them away.”
    Also, that “tradition” doesn’t have a bearing on what makes a good superhero movie. The Batman Begins trilogy wandered far afield from “tradition” and were good (and more importantly to the company, monetarily successful) movies.

    Now, you said: “Maybe not for you.” I have no idea which part of my previous comment that applies to. It certainly can’t be the part I just restated–because then you would have to say that Alan, Guy, John, and Kyle are being “destroyed” by not being in the movie. You say that lovers of these characters (implying that I…do not adore Guy Gardner? And Alan?) would be “just as angry as [me] because of this incident.” So, are you saying A) Fans of *insert Green Lantern Here* would be pissed off if their Green Lantern were on DC’s hit-list or B) Fans of *insert Green Lantern Here* would be pissed off if their Green Lantern didn’t get to be the primary GL pushed forward in DC’s non-comic marketing.

    If it’s A–then you’re exactly right. Fans hate seeing characters they love get killed. It’s usually for stupid reasons anyway. But that has no bearing on my previous statement, because I didn’t call for Hal Jordan to be killed.

    If it’s B–maybe, but well…so? So you’ve got five Green Lanterns and you can only push one to start–so four groups of folks would be unhappy, however you slice it. Unless we’re talking reasonable fans. I mean, my favorite Lantern isn’t John. It’s Guy. He is fantastic. But I wouldn’t want him to be the primary Green Lantern in the first movie because Guy can’t carry the title without the history–the whole point of Guy is that Green Lanterns are supposed to be noble and elite and well-respected throughout the galaxy, and then here’s Guy wearing the ring and acting like a jerk. Glorious, but since he’s a subversion, he can’t carry the title himself without the history first. John, as was proven in four seasons of a wildly successful show, CAN.

    And that’s the point that most people are making when saying that they wished John Stewart had been the Green Lantern DC chose to make a movie around–because while Hal Jordan is the more recognizable to the comicbook community, once you take into account the vast audience of the general public (the audience you need to encourage to see your movie, since the comic buffs are already guaranteed) and casual comic fans, the most recognizable Green Lantern right now is “the black one.” They might not all know his name, but they know what he looks like. He’s the guy who was in the Justice League show they grew up with. He’s even the primary Green Lantern on ALL of their current kids books/toys. Hal makes an appearance sometimes, but usually, for the younger generation, it’s still John.

    You can argue “tradition” until you’re blue in the face, but it doesn’t change the FACTS (since you seem adamant about that word) that to the general public, Stewart has just as much, if not more, recognition than Jordan.

    More importantly–dude. Get over the word “destroy.”

    No, seriously. What the crap do you even mean by that word? Because the way you’re using it seems to mean: “to not make the most important.” And…that’s not what that word means. Not by a long shot. And more importantly, no one is calling for DC to “destroy” Hal Jordan.

  • http://twitter.com/LauraTruxillo Laura Truxillo

    Being pedantic here–almost every character who’s been around a few decade was “flawed and inconsistent” in their execution until somebody fixed them. Including Hal.

  • Anonymous

    Btw, Xena is *not* Ares’ daughter.

    That’s my theory and I’m sticking to it. And, it is just a theory-nothing more. Just as the idea that Batman & Robin are gay lovers should be just that.

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    I find it very interesting when people have theories that have no actual bearing in the reality of a comic/show/movie according to their respective creators…

  • http://twitter.com/MisfitsTamara Tamara Brooks

    I find it very interesting when people have theories that have no actual bearing in the reality of a comic/show/movie according to their respective creators…

  • RJ

    John became a problem when Him and Shayera generated so much buzz. So much so the next move was to pair up Superman and Wonder Woman. Even worse was the effort to make Lanterns second rate by making Alan Scott gay, and then dropping and Arab American in as a green lantern in a time where Arabs were frowned upon. Then to top it all off John kills another lantern Mogo…It was all in an effort to shame him.

    John is popular, and while he doesn’t need his own movie, he should be in the Superman movie, at some point and there should be a GL2 Transfer of Power, where Hal makes the decision to sacrifice his being to Parallax when he feels John is more than Capable of sector 2814. Incidently, the source of Hal’s jealousy is simple because the Guardians not the ring chose John Stewart a Marine enlisted man, who shows even more will than the ring can withstand, in time Hal realizes John is the most powerful GL even and he knows the best way to save Earth from Parallax is to enter his being and drive him away from Earth, but he will not do that until he knows John can protect the sector.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Alex-Werges/100002538067110 Alex Werges

    Why wouldn’t they? They already killed off Artemis in “The Culling” crossover when she is one of the main characters in the well-received and fairly recent animated series “Young Justice.” Also, in the closing issue of “The Ravagers” they had Slade abducting Terra when no one wants to see her go down that route again. Anyone who read the old Teen Titan comics or watched the animated series knows where this is going. The death of John is just another bad move in a long list of bad moves that would not be made by a person who knows the history of these characters.

  • Anonymous

    Mostly just John Stewart. Sorry, your memory’s faulty.

  • Anonymous

    I also find it amazing that people can’t accept that Wonder Woman can’t be depicted in a more complex and human way that isn’t the standard PC ‘she has to be the hero for all girls’ mode. As a teenage girl said to me this year at Comic Book Day, she still kicks butt, and that’s all that matters.

  • Anonymous

    Damn right, and damn straight.

  • Tamara Brooks

    I like complex and human. I don’t like lazy or changes just for the sake of changes or so desperately trying to appeal to an ever-shrinking audience that you undermine the character, their world & what it’s supposed to represent. And she doesn’t have “to be a hero for all girls” – she just has to be a hero, which is pretty complex enough. Relatability is not a gendered thing, it’s a “it’ll work if you aren’t a crappy writer” thing. As I said, there are plenty of ways of achieving all the major plot points Azzarello hit without destroying her origin.

  • Tamara Brooks

    Nope, it’s most of the DCAU characters. Every DCAU show has come up with an excellent representation of the comic characters they featured and the vast majority of them were major improvements on what was going on in the comics. That’s why so many of the comics began depicting characters like the animated versions.

  • Anonymous

    But you (and the writer of this article, as well as everybody else who agrees with her) are being petty crabapples simply because most of us (BTW, I’m a Afro-Canadian male) disagree with you over John Stewart and how he ought to be handled, and are also using reason to make you see why DC Comics might want to get rid of him. So, it goes both ways. Even if Hal Jordan and Alan Scott mean nothing to you, both characters still mean something to a lot of people, and getting rid of Hal just to feature John (and only John), because you and every other young person grew up with him due to a TV show is just as dick and stupid as you feel killing off John is.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe so, but that still doesn’t erase the fact that John Stewart was a character handled badly, and not as interesting as Hal Jordan.

  • Tamara Brooks

    He’s not as interesting *to you*. That is not a fact, that is an opinion. And everyone’s been handled badly in the comics at some point. There is no such thing as a 30+ year old character with a spotless comic record.

  • Anonymous

    And the same applies to you in your view of Hal Jordan/John Stewart. A popular TV show doesn’t change that.

  • Anonymous

    If DC was smart, they would fire most of their editorial staff, not to mention whoever is in charge of their live action films, and hire the team behind their animated universe to take over the company. Their comics are ok, their live action films are pretty blah at best (yes, even the Dark Knight trilogy, which was a good set of films, just not a good set of Batman films). But their animated series and films are nothing short of perfection. Great stories that are true to the comics, great acting, great animation.

  • Martin Blase

    With all due respect to the writers and their immense talents, that’s the hand you play with when you work for a major comics company. Their characters, their universe, their direction, your stories. If you’re really, really good, you get to guide the direction. But the company still owns the characters, including any new ones you create.

    If a writer doesn’t like it. he should write for himself. Self-published comics are becoming more and more successful (“Walking Dead” being just the latest example) and novels give a writer nearly complete creative control (Neil Gaiman ended his run on “Sandman” and proceeded to win all kinds of awards for his modern fantasy books).

  • Martin Blase

    Nope, Earth women only get to join the Star Sapphire core and wear violet rings of love. (Alien women are Green Lanterns, though.)

  • SaintStryfe

    Welcome to reason 30 as to why I stopped buying books…

  • SaintStryfe

    as a fan – they’re shoving Cyborg down our throats. He’s a Titan, not a Justice Leaguer.

  • SaintStryfe

    Arisia.

  • SaintStryfe

    then DC would be chasing Marvel (who to be fair – chased DC – they released a Muslim Superhero, Marvel releases a teenage girl Muslim hero…)

  • SaintStryfe

    Killing Damian was just good taste. He sucked, he always sucked and I’m REAL happy to have him gone. I hated the character, I hated the concept.

  • SaintStryfe

    yeah, this is pretty much my opinion, though I’m higher on Hal than you seem to be. I like Hal a lot, and I think he should be the “Lead” earth Lantern. And if one should be removed, it should be Kyle – not because I hate Kyle, but because he’s redundant. If anything, he should find his own path – on Earth, without the GL’s at all.

    What I’m really tired of is limited/token participation. That is hurting the brand more than anything. It doesn’t draw in new, younger fans (who are more and more minorities), and it alienates the older fans who still want fresh stories.

    Speaking of fresh stories, how about some? We get it DC, you’ve done three wars with the Sinestro Corps now and two with the other ES corps. It’s DONE. MOVE ON. Find a new villain. The idea’s been stale for a decade now.

  • Anonymous

    But John won’t be, since the movie’s all about Superman & Batman (with just a little bit of Wonder Woman in it.) And compared to Hal Jordan, John has a boring personal life and origin story (no family mentioned like in the Green Lantern movie, and a boring origin story with little personal growth compared to Hal’s)-that’s why Hal Jordan was the character in the movie and not John. People like you need to be realistic about this, but they won’t, because they’re blinded by being fans of a popular TV show with John in it-a version of marketing being driven by youth if ever I saw it.

  • Anonymous

    I’m sorry, but my being a long-time fan trumps yours-get up off of your butt and read the books (where do you think the source of what you watched came from?)

  • Anonymous

    Get into the industry (or get mote people [friends and family] to read said books), and you’ll get what you want.

  • Anonymous

    He’s a Justice Leaguer now (even in the two most recent video games)-try and keep up.

  • SaintStryfe

    no thanks, not worth it. The stories haven’t been entertaining enough to care about since the Nu52, and I’ve never been a Marvel guy, so I think i’ll just move onto other storytelling formats.

  • BatiHoney

    You just replied to comment I made ten months ago, so I’m not even going to keep discussing this or start arguing with you, but your comment was uncalled for and made no sense whatsoever… and it was really rude.

    Just know this: How many comics you’ve read doesn’t make you better than anyone and if you’re offended because I like one GL better than the other, because I watched the cartoon or because I didn’t know Hal Jordan a few years ago, then I don’t even know what to tell you.

  • Anonymous

    I’m offended because people like you (in a lot more spheres of life as well) think that history and certain things begins when you notice them. They do not, and this exalting of John Stewart over Hal Jordan is one example. Like it or not, both Jordan (and Scott) were the prime Green Lanterns in the public sphere long before Justice League came on the air and featured John Stewart (who I love a lot [and now wish that I'd bought the Mattel action figure of!])-to throw either away would have been seen as a sign of disrespect to the history of the character. This is something that you will have to deal with (as in ‘life’s not fair’) and not be constantly offended by.

  • BatiHoney

    Why, whyyyyyyyyy say this in a reply to ME and not just post it as a comment in the article? whyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy?

    I guess I didn’t leave it 100% clear but I loved Damian and his character and his development and I think it was a stupid, sucky decision to kill him, so let’s agree to disagree. Good for you if you’re happy -shrugs- I’m not.

  • Anonymous

    Your choice and your loss-either way, have a nice life.

  • BatiHoney

    I was never offended?

    I didn’t know about Hal Jordan, and when someone sat down and explained to me (because you can’t know things magically and I wasn’t into comics back then), I calmed down and went “Oh okay. I wish it was John tho” because I REALLY LIKED HIM, and that’s it. That’s what I thought back when the movie came out, it is NOT what I think now. And you’re assuming from my anecdote that I’m one of those people who think they should have ignored Hal and done John instead. I never said that??? And I certainly don’t think that. Some people who commented on this article do though, but you decided to reply to me.

    I wasn’t complaining in my comment, I was sharing an anecdote agreeing with Jill. You’re assuming a lot of things about me even though you don’t know me and read just that one comment that you completely made your own assumptions of. You’re the one who got offended and you’re telling me I gotta deal with your rude reply on something 100% harmless I said 10 months ago?? I can’t really follow your line of thought, but meh, this my last reply to you. Life’s not fair? Yeah, it isn’t, so deal with people having a different opinion than you and don’t go sending rude messages to strangers who haven’t been rude to anyone or you??

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    Your original reply was unnecessarily rude and negative, which is why it was deleted. Sorry to break it to you but being a fan of something longer than another person trumps nothing. Try and foster a more positive fan experience by sharing your loves next time instead of railing on someone because you think they aren’t being a fan the correct way.

  • Anonymous

    If you don’t want to hear anything from me (and others) about this, then you have to start being sensible about it rather than be silly and emotarian about it-one of the things that you can do is get into the industry and take a page from the DIY spirit of the punk movement and create your own comic books with your own superheroes, instead of feeling that DC has to please you by doing only what you say.

  • MisfitsTamara

    Curious about what you mean by “limited/token participation” – care to elaborate?