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James Damore Is Suing Google for Discriminating Against White Dudes & the Lawsuit Is the Most Ridiculous Thing You’ll Read Today

James Damore, the guy who was fired from Google after writing a 10-page screed accusing the company of discriminating against conservative white men, has filed a lawsuit against his previous employers and oh wow, it is ... something.

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Underground Caves, Deep-Sea Labs, and Learning Not to Be a Jerk: Training as an Astronaut

Astronaut Jessica U. Meir sat down with TMS and gave us a glimpse into all the technical, physical, and psychological training that goes into becoming an astronaut - as well as all the cool, otherworldly environments they get to explore.

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“There’s No One Path” : How Astronaut Jessica Meir Went From Studying Animal Physiology to Training for Space Flight

Jessica U. Meir sat down with TMS to talk about her career as a biologist and as one of the NASA astronauts who's working to get us to Mars. "There’s no one path to becoming an astronaut," she said. "Originally, all of the astronauts were white male military test pilots. And now the program is much more diverse."

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Teen Girls Use Math to Prove Once & For All That Jack Could Have Fit on That Door With Rose

Don't @ me.

It's been twenty years this month since Titanic was released in theaters, which means fans have spent two full decades arguing over whether or not Jack had to die, because from where we were all sitting, that door Rose floats on, saving her life, looked to have a whole lot of room left over.

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“Women of NASA” LEGO Set Is Already Amazon’s Bestselling Toy

Back in October (because it is really November guys. Holy hell!) we raved about how excited we were for the "Women of NASA" LEGO set that was getting ready to be launched. Well, the toy was released today and is already killing it.

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NASA Just Opened the Katherine G. Johnson Computational Research Facility

Yesterday, NASA opened the Katherine G. Johnson Computational Research Facility (CRF) at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Johnson, whose life was one of the inspirations for Hidden Figures, worked as a "human computer" at Langley in the 1960s, calculating the trajectories for the first US space flights.

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Did Researchers Really Try and Say Urination Games Are the Reason Boys Score Higher in Physics?

Urine-trouble.

Zooming into the notable gender gap in answering projectile questions specifically, the theory questions whether that might be because of participation in ball sports or.....peeing. 

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New Hidden Figures-Inspired STEM Initiative Shows the Importance of Media Representation

And now for a change of pace: some good news from the government! Hidden Figures may have run its traditional theatrical course, but it hasn't faded from the minds of those it might inspire. In fact, the United States State Department was bombarded with so many screening requests from foreign embassies that a publicly funded exchange for women in STEM is now in the works.

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“Let’s get back those 37 cents”: Serena Williams Pens Essay for Black Women’s Equal Pay Day

In a piece for Fortune, titled "How Black Women Can Close the Pay Gap," tennis legend Serena Williams writes about today being Black Women's Equal Pay Day and the day "shines a light on the long-neglected fact that the gender pay gap hits women of color the hardest."

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Awesome! Girl Scouts Just Added 23 New STEM Badges

The Girl Scouts of the USA announced today that they're introducing 23 new badges in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math, as well as the outdoors.

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Afghanistan’s All-Girl Robotics Team Won a Silver Medal at Their Competition

After being denied their visas twice, a six-girl robotics team from Afghanistan was awarded the Rajaa Cherkaoui El Moursli Award for Courageous Achievement at an international robotics competition.

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Maryam Mirzakhani, the First Woman Honored with The Fields Medal, Has Died at the Age of 40

Maryam Mirzakhani, the first woman and first Iranian to be awarded the Fields Medal, has passed away at the age of 40 from breast cancer. 

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Things We Saw Today: Fiona the Hippo Reunites With Both Her Parents

“Fiona has been exploring the outdoor habitat with her mom for several weeks and has had contact with Henry inside, but today was the first time that the three hippos have been together.  Bibi was protective of Fiona and gave Henry cues about how to interact appropriately with the little one.”

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Today’s Google Doodle Honors Scientist Eva Ekeblad, to Whom We Owe Vodka and Other Potato-Based Miracles

At a time when potatoes were still relatively rare and not the staples that we recognize today, Eva Ekeblad conducted experiments and brought vodka, potato flour, and more to Europe during Sweden's food crises. 

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Former GitHub Employee Writes About Company’s Failure to Uphold Its Own Values

In "Antisocial Coding: My Year At Github," Coraline Ada Ehmke recalls her time of employment at the company's Community & Safety team.

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“Death by A Thousand Cuts”: Women Engineers Speak Out About the Sexism in Silicon Valley

In this video from Wired, women engineers speak about their experiences with workplace sexism and racism in the tech industry.

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Wonder Woman, Doctor Poison, and Solidarity In the Face of Patriarchy

One of the things that fascinated me most about Wonder Woman was the use of DC villain, Doctor Poison, known in the film as Doctor Isabel Maru. How she is handled, and her subsequent fate tell us a lot about what Diana learns about humanity and the importance of mercy. However, can how Diana chose to deal with Doctor Maru teach us something about solidarity in the face of oppression? **SPOILERS, YO.**

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An Animated Lesson on the Genius of Marie Skłodowska Curie

In a new TED-Ed animated lesson, Shohini Ghose takes us through Marie Skłodowska Curie’s great achievements and the impact of her revolutionary discoveries.

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Attendee Shames Mostly-Male Science Panel For Mansplaining to Female Theoretical Physicist

First, let's look at the image above of a panel on "Pondering the Imponderables: The Biggest Questions of Cosmology" which was held at the World Science Festival at John Jay College in New York City this weekend. On this seven-person panel, only one is a woman, the literal odd person out. One gets the feeling they had a six-person panel, realized there were no women, then rushed to find one. This is the scientific community, Ladies and Gentlemen.

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Google’s Got a Fun Wonder Woman Game to Teach Kids to Code

There are many ways in which superheroes can inspire kids, but what about going beyond moral lessons and teaching specific practical skills? Google's Made with Code is doing just that, and they're using the Wonder Woman movie to do it.

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