Skip to main content

‘Velma’: Who’s Who in the ‘Scooby-Doo’ Prequel Series

Jinkies!

Velma talks on the phone in a scene from the new animated 'Scooby-Doo' prequel series 'Velma'

This ain’t your parents’ Scooby Gang. For one, Velma will apparently not feature the talking dog for which Mystery Inc. is famous. But what are the other ways this prequel differs from the Scooby-Doo adventures of the past? Keep reading for a complete guide to every character in the new HBO Max animated series.

Velma

Played by Mindy Kaling, Velma Dinkley is a would-be teen detective who’s struggling with being an outcast. While Velma has always been the lead detective of the gang, her character has rarely been given a more in-depth exploration apart from “likes mysteries” and “doesn’t believe in the supernatural.” The new series seeks to fix that by telling the origins of Mystery Inc. from her perspective, while also exploring the disappearance of her mother.

Norville

Norville, a.k.a. Shaggy, voiced by Sam Richardson in the animated series 'Velma'
(HBO)

Voiced by Sam Richardson, Norville Rogers (more commonly known to fans as “Shaggy”) is Velma’s best friend, and he’s dealing with an unrequited crush on the eponymous teen. Velma and Shaggy have had crushes on each other in the past, most notably in the Mystery Incorporated series, but the two have rarely been an item for very long. This is the first time Norville has been depicted as Black, has confirmed his drug use, and will (likely) reveal the origin of his Shaggy nickname.

Daphne

Daphne, voiced by Constance Wu, sasses a trio of band nerds in the animated series 'Velma'
(HBO)

Voiced by Constance Wu, Daphne is described as “a popular girl and Velma’s former best friend, who has ‘complicated feelings’ for her.” (Please give us bisexual Velma, please give us bisexual Velma.) The most recent trailer definitely appears to be alluding to some sapphic feelings between Velma and Daphne, but it could also be queer-baiting audiences like the pilot of Riverdale, which is referenced in the first episode. Daphne’s arc apparently involves the search for her birth parents. (Hmm, wonder if that will relate to the disappearance of Velma’s mother in any way?)

Fred

Fred, voiced by Glenn Howerton, expresses frustration in a scene from the animated series 'Velma'
(HBO)

Played by Glenn Howerton, Fred Jones is the Scooby Gang member about whom we know the least. He seems to be played like a stereotypical popular jerk, literally claiming to have a condition where he cannot “recognize people who aren’t hot.” The casting of Howerton, who plays similarly shallow characters in It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and the short-lived AP Bio, feels apt.

Side Characters

We don’t know much about the rest of the star-studded cast, apart from the fact that this will be one of the few shows/movies to feature the gang’s family members; Gary Cole and Nicole Byer are playing Lamont and Blythe Rogers, Cherry Jones and Frank Welker are playing Victoria and William Jones, and Russell Peters is playing Aman Dinkley. I guess this will “answer” the question of where these kids’ parents are while they’re off solving mysteries and getting hunted by serial killers and ghosts.

The rest of the cast is also filled with recognizable names, such as Ming-Na Wen as Carroll, Debby Ryan as Krista, Melissa Fumero as Sophie, Stephen Root as Sheriff Cogburn, Shay Mitchell as Brenda, Jane Lynch as Donna Blay, “Weird Al” Yankovic as Dandruff Tuba, Wanda Sykes as Linda Ke, Fortune Feimster as Olive, Sarayu Blue as Diya, Yvonne Orji as Gigi, and Karl-Anthony Towns as Jaques Beau. Weird Al’s appearance is especially funny as he previously made a cameo appearance in the Scooby-Doo and Guess Who? cartoon.

(featured image: HBO Max)

Have a tip we should know? [email protected]

Filed Under:

Follow The Mary Sue:

Kimberly Terasaki is a Creative Writing graduate, fanfiction author, and intersectional feminist. She liked Ahsoka Tano before it was cool, will fight you about Rey being a “Mary Sue,” and is a Kamala Khan stan. She appreciates all constructive criticism and genuine discussion.