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What's with the name?

Allow us to explain.

Things We Saw Today

Things We Saw Today: What If This Was Wonder Woman’s Costume?


Dresden Codak‘s Aaron Diaz has five redesigns for popular comic book characters including Wonder Woman (above), Starfire, and Superman (not just costumes, but origins, too). They are thoughtful, appropriate, and super interesting. (at Indistinguishable From Magic)

And here is even more exciting news: This Monday, we are very excited to welcome The Nerdy Bird herself, Jill Pantozzi to our crazy coven of geekery! And that’s pretty nuts, because we’ve been admiring her work from afar for a while now (and we’re super jealous that she has Kevin Conroy on her answering machine). A freelancer for several other sites, including Newsarama (where her column Hey, That’s My Cape! will continue), we’re looking forward to making wonderful nerdwords together. Welcome, Jill!

Also! If you’re interested in getting a free Nokia Sidekick, you’ve only got until the end of the weekend to like our page on Facebook or follow us on Twitter!

I can’t decide whether this is so meta that it’s awesome … or if I’m just impressed and hungry. (via Blastr)

  • After a campaign by the Feminist Majority Foundation, 130,000 people have signed a petition demanding that the FBI change the definition of “forcible rape,” which does not include the following in the annual Uniform Crime Report: statutory rape, same-sex rape, forced anal or oral sex, rape with an object and victims who are male or transgender. And now, it appears that the country’s top law enforcement organization is listening and will be looking into modernizing the official definition. (via Ms. Magazine)
  • A new study from the University of Basque Country says that mothers are mostly responsible for transferring attitudes about sexism to their children, so have a care, everybody. But there’s a catch: even the author says it might not be the most reliable study:

    The author states that “if we bear in mind that women are the main victims of sexism, it is paradoxical that they are the ones who have a greater influence when it comes to the transference of such damaging attitudes”. However, she goes on to admit that “we are unable to confirm that this relationship is of a cause-effect nature given that our study is not correlational and does not use experimental methodology.”

    (via MedicalXpress)

  • When there is so much dialogue on network and cable TV that is blatantly sexual and graphic, to say nothing of the violence seen on crime procedurals, is it time to admit that letting an f-bomb slip probably wouldn’t be that big of a deal? Some are saying, “F*ck it, let’s just say it.” (at The Week)
  • While everyone follows the hullabaloo surrounding the new DC Universe, some in the comics industry are wondering what’s happening to the women of Marvel? Or, more like, where are the women of Marvel? (via Comics Beat)
  • And, finally, if you’re going to be pregnant this Halloween, here are some costume suggestions for you (that do not include the tried-and-true nun’s habit, because of the whole “see what I did there” element). (via Offbeat Mama)

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    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7G4SWUX2MCWWXLMYNN347JMIZY Frodo Baggins

      “change the definition of “forcible rape,” which does not include the following in the annual Uniform Crime Report: statutory rape, same-sex rape, forced anal or oral sex, rape with an object and victims who are male or transgender.”

      Most of those sound obviously in need of correction, but I thought the whole point of categorizing statutory rape was to distinguish sex that a minor consents to (if not legally) from forcible rape.

    • Anonymous

      /A new study from the University of Basque Country says that mothers
      are mostly responsible for transferring attitudes about sexism to their
      children, so have a care, everybody. But there’s a catch: even the
      author says it might not be the most reliable study:/

      So in other words they’d like to blame the victim of social brainwashing for passing on what the media and society have made her believe is true. As long as we are bombarded with these social mores on a daily basis and the ones in power reinforce them, what do you expect?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7G4SWUX2MCWWXLMYNN347JMIZY Frodo Baggins

      Just because such social mores are transmitted through the mother doesn’t mean the mother is to blame. It just means it would be more fruitful to put resources toward UN-brainwashing mothers, so they teach their daughters better attitudes, whereas if such social mores were primarily transmitted through fathers, they would be a better focus for trying to change girls’ minds.

    • http://profiles.google.com/mkjonese Emma Jones

      Actually, I’ve heard this theory before. Read Borderlands by Anzaldua. She talks about how much the women in her culture are the ones to pass on the sexism. This isn’t out of ill-will, but as a means of protection from how they perceive the world. If your mindset is ‘This is just how men are, and they don’t have to take responsibility’ you are going to want to protect your daughters from that in any way you can, and that often involves sexism. In the U.S., it’s just a less-extreme version of what happens in many third-world countries. It’s not the mother’s fault, it’s just how she knows how to navigate the world.

      Think of it this way. Someone is carrying a disease that they are unaware of. They pass it on to someone else who is susceptible. Is it their fault? No. But they are the reason for the other person being sick.

    • Anonymous

      /Just because such social mores are transmitted through the mother doesn’t mean the mother is to blame./

      This statement conveniently takes the men out of the equation, by saying, but oh it is not our fault that women believe this. That they are the ones benefiting from keeping it this way is completely ignored.

      Another thing to think is about is: So they claim the women pass this attitude on to their children, if that is so, then who to teach them better? Oh right: Men.

      I still see nothing but cheap blame shifting.

    • Anonymous

      To keep your metaphor:
      Who’s going to decide on the medicine and administer it? Since the sick can obviously not be trusted not to spread their disease or get better on their own.

      You are once again leaving the power for the cure in the hands of the people who artificially created the disease in the first place: Men.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7G4SWUX2MCWWXLMYNN347JMIZY Frodo Baggins

      You’re seeing whatever you want to see, obviously. But if you actually read the article, the study doesn’t suggest any of what you’re claiming.

      It DOESN’T take men out of the equation, it studies how sexist fathers, mothers, daughters, and sons are. By comparing them, the researchers found that the level of sexism in the children is aligned more closely to the level of sexism in the mother than the level of sexism in the father. Which is to say, if the mother is really sexist, and the father is not so sexist, the kids are more likely to end up really sexist, whereas if the mother is not so sexist, and the father is really sexist, the kids are more likely to end up not so sexist.

      NOWHERE do they suggest that therefore, women should take less of a role in educating their children, and men should take over. On the other hand, they emphasize the importance of educating parents in egalitarian values. Is that a goal you disagree with?

      Also, they specifically state “sexist attitudes also develop from other significant sources. These include the social group to which each person belongs or the media, which would need to have some involvement if sexism were to be reduced.”

      If this is what you call cheap blame shifting, you’re just being willfully contrarian.