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Tornado

  1. NASA Releases Image of Oklahoma Tornado as Seen From Space

    This NASA image shows the tornado that devastated Oklahoma as seen from space.

    NASA released this image today. It shows the storm that produced the devastating F4 tornado that hit Oklahoma yesterday minutes before the tornado touched down south of Oklahoma City. The image was taken with NASA's MODIS instrument on one of their Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites. You can donate $10 to the victims of the tornado by texting REDCROSS to 90999.

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  2. Man-Made Swirling Vortexes of Doom Can Be an Eco-Friendly Power Source

    Whenever we think of tornadoes, more often than not the image of an unstoppable natural engine of destruction wreaking havoc on unsuspecting farmers in rural America typically comes to mind -- that and the 1996 Bill Paxton vehicle Twister. Canadian entrepreneur and engineer Louis Michaud, on the other hand, sees a potentially eco-friendly new source of energy. Meddling with the most primal forces of nature, Michaud has outlined a method to create and harness these swirling vortexes of doom as a means of powering turbines that generate useable energy. The plan may sound like the dastardly machinations of a comic book super villain, but the project has actually piqued the interest of a high-profile financial backer.

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  3. If All the Tornadoes From the Past 56 Years Left Neon Blue Tracks Across the US, It Would Look Like This [Infographic]

    Armed with 56 years of information on tornadoes and a computer, John Nelson has created this remarkable map of the United States. On it, he's charted all of the known tornadoes and color-coded them by intensity. The result is a beautiful, if terrifying, map of destruction. See it, after the break.

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  4. The Destructive Texas Tornadoes Spotted from Space

    The intense storm system that ravaged Texas earlier in the week, dropping a reported 15 tornados before finally dissipating, shocked viewers across the country as incredible footage of the storms dominated news coverage. Scienistists at the National Oceanica and Atmospheric Administration were watching too, and have released a video of the storms as seen from space using data from their Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 13 (GOES 13).

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  5. Nothing to See Here, Just an Earth-Sized Tornado on the Surface of the Sun

    In early February, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured footage of whirling tornado-like storm on the surface of the sun. This enormous mass of plasma raged for over a day and was estimated to be larger than the Earth. Of course, it's not a tornado in the same way that we understand them here on Earth. It's obviously way bigger, way more terrifying, and way weirder.

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  6. Massive Tornado “Debris Ball” Caught on Radar

    An interesting, and no doubt terrifying, look at one of the massive tornadoes that ripped through the southern U.S. this past week. The bright white dot in this radar image is not only the funnel cloud, but a mass of flying debris caught up in the vortex. Paul Douglas with the On Weather blog explains:
    Here's a reflectivity view from Birmingham (NWS) Doppler around 6:30 pm Wednesday, showing a 1/2 to 1 mile wide tornado. The energy beam from the Doppler is actually reflecting off debris swept up in the tornado.
    (On Weather via TYWKIWDBI)

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  7. Dude, There Was a Tornado in Brooklyn Yesterday [Video]

    Brooklyn, New York was hit with a surprise tornado yesterday, and for a variety of reasons that you will appreciate if you watch it (namely: insanity), the video above has already emerged as the 'viral video of the Brooklyn tornado of 2k10.' Deadspin's Barry Petchesky: "'Look At The Tree' Tornado Video Is The East Coast's 'Double Rainbow.'" Thanks, Dan.

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  8. Watch a Tornado Destroy an Auto Arena in Montana [Video]

    Kyle Reynolds, a pastor in Billings, Montana, shot this remarkable amateur video of a tornado ripping through the Rimrock Auto Arena in Billings' MetraPark events center yesterday. Fortunately, no one was in the building at the time the tornado hit: In the words of a man interviewed by local paper The Missoulian, a funnel cloud with a diameter of 12 feet at its top "came down and tore the roof off and hung around for probably three to four minutes ... It just picked up the roof of the Metra like it was paper."

    Video below:

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