woody allen, me too, times up

Woody Allen Says He Should Be the “Poster Boy” for the #MeToo Movement

Recommended Videos

For all the powerful, prominent men who have faced consequences for their sexual misconduct during the rise of the #MeTo and Time’s Up movements, Woody Allen has remained infuriatingly unscathed. He’s still churning out stories about teenage and 20-something ingenues finding themselves lustfully awestruck over nebbish intellectual father figures. He still has plenty of celebrities eager to voice their support for him. (Although the list of those speaking out against him is slowly growing.)

Now, in a rare interview, Allen has spoken about the #MeToo movement and his role in it. Unsurprisingly, he thinks he’s been treated unfairly. Allen has addressed the movement before, saying he supports it but worries about a “witch hunt atmosphere.” Clearly, what that means is, “I support it until it includes me.”

In this new interview with the Argentinian outlet Periodismo Para Todos (via Quartz), he talked about the “terrible harassers” who have been made to answer for their behavior. Allen says, “What bothers me is that I get linked with them. People who have been accused by 20 women, 50 women, 100 women of abuse and abuse and abuse— and I, who was only accused by one woman in a child custody case which was looked at and proven to be untrue, I get lumped in with these people.”

Yes, Woody Allen thinks he should basically get an award for not harassing 100 women throughout his career and instead only having been accused of abusing his then-seven-year-old adopted daughter.

“As I say I’m a big advocate of the Me Too movement,” he continued. “I feel when they find people who harass innocent women and men, it’s a good thing that they’re exposing them. But you know I, I should be the poster boy for the Me Too movement. Because I have worked in movies for 50 years. I’ve worked with hundreds of actresses and not a single one—big ones, famous ones, ones starting out—have ever suggested any kind of impropriety at all. I’ve always had a wonderful record with them.”

I think Woody Allen and I have different ideas of what it means to be the “poster boy” for a movement designed to shine a light on the prevalence of sexual harassment and assault. Because I, too, think he’d be a great face for the movement, as a representation for everything it stands against. Like, for starters, the idea that being accused of sexual abuse by a young child is somehow better than being accused by 20 women.

Allen is a great “poster boy” for #MeToo’s message that there isn’t just one kind of abuse–that no one is getting “lumped in” to one monolithic group, but rather we are pushing for a new era where all victims’ experiences are heard and respected. And Allen is certainly the perfect mascot for someone whose accuser has walked through the fires of victim-blaming, being called a liar and an opportunist, being told she was delusional or manipulated by her mother, which is only another way to deny her agency in the telling of her own experience. He is the perfect example of the man whose all-too credible accusations roll off of him like he’s pure Teflon.

In those ways, yes, Woody Allen is the perfect “poster boy” for the Me Too movement, as he represents so many of the reasons it has to exist.

(via Quartz, image: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Want more stories like this? Become a subscriber and support the site!

The Mary Sue has a strict comment policy that forbids, but is not limited to, personal insults toward anyone, hate speech, and trolling.—


The Mary Sue is supported by our audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Learn more
related content
Read Article ‘Live Through This’ Is 30 and I’m Still Mad About That Kurt Cobain Rumor
'Live Through This' album cover and Kurt Cobain/Courtney Love
Read Article J.K. Rowling’s Legal Threat to Journalists for Calling Out Holocaust Denial Backfires
J.K. Rowling
Read Article The Attacks on HBCUs Extend Beyond Tennessee
Protesters in Nashville hold a press conference to protest state repubilicans voting to vacate the entire board of HBCU Tennessee State University.
Read Article Black Creatives Sign Open Letter in Solidarity With ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Actress Francesca Amewudah-Rivers
Tom Holland and Francesca Amewudah-Rivers in red for Romeo and Juliet
Read Article Grace Jabbari Responds to Jonathan Majors’ Sentencing in Domestic Abuse Case
Jonathan Majors leaves the Manhattan Criminal Court after his sentencing in domestic abuse case
Related Content
Read Article ‘Live Through This’ Is 30 and I’m Still Mad About That Kurt Cobain Rumor
'Live Through This' album cover and Kurt Cobain/Courtney Love
Read Article J.K. Rowling’s Legal Threat to Journalists for Calling Out Holocaust Denial Backfires
J.K. Rowling
Read Article The Attacks on HBCUs Extend Beyond Tennessee
Protesters in Nashville hold a press conference to protest state repubilicans voting to vacate the entire board of HBCU Tennessee State University.
Read Article Black Creatives Sign Open Letter in Solidarity With ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Actress Francesca Amewudah-Rivers
Tom Holland and Francesca Amewudah-Rivers in red for Romeo and Juliet
Read Article Grace Jabbari Responds to Jonathan Majors’ Sentencing in Domestic Abuse Case
Jonathan Majors leaves the Manhattan Criminal Court after his sentencing in domestic abuse case
Author
Vivian Kane
Vivian Kane (she/her) is the Senior News Editor at The Mary Sue, where she's been writing about politics and entertainment (and all the ways in which the two overlap) since the dark days of late 2016. Born in San Francisco and radicalized in Los Angeles, she now lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where she gets to put her MFA to use covering the local theatre scene. She is the co-owner of The Pitch, Kansas City’s alt news and culture magazine, alongside her husband, Brock Wilbur, with whom she also shares many cats.