Rick, Carl, & Michonne in The Walking Dead season 8

What Episode Does Carl Die in ‘The Walking Dead’? Answered

It didn't have to end like that.

It may seem silly to stew on death in a series that focuses so heavily on it. I mean, it’s literally in the name and all. AMC’s The Walking Dead has just made some poor choices, as a series, in terms of character deaths—and no, I’m not talking about Glenn (Steven Yeun) getting Lucille’d by Negan. That was always going to happen. Carl’s (Chandler Rigg) death, however, was an unnecessary departure from the source material and served as a domino effect for other exits—not to mention the reasoning he was killed off and how shady it was.

Recommended Videos

Carl’s character was the heart of the show (whether you think so or not) and had so much story left to tell. This is especially true considering how he survives to the end of the comics. It’s unfortunate that his story was cut shorter than it even needed to be. Carl was killed off in season 8, but what episode did he bite the big one?

What episode does Carl die?

Carl during his last The Walking Dead episode
(AMC)

Trigger warning: mention of suicide.

The fact that Carl dies is terrible enough, but the way it plays out in the show is still infuriating. Carl wants a better world and for the communities to end the war with the Saviors, and the thing that winds up getting him bit by a walker is helping Siddiq (Avi Nash). The lethal bite is something that he manages to keep from everyone—until he can’t hide it anymore, and he shows it to Rick and Michonne at the end of season 8’s midseason finale, episode 8, “How It’s Gotta Be.”

Carl’s death occurs in “Honor” (season 8, episode 9), and before he passes (by way of a self-inflicted gunshot), he writes letters to several people (including Negan). It’s shitty that he even has to die at all, and that Judith doesn’t get to actually know him. His death and wishes are essentially what ends the All Out War arc during the finale. And while that seems like the most fitting way for the arc to come to a close, it’s still a bittersweet thing.

(featured image: AMC)


The Mary Sue is supported by our audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Learn more
related content
Read Article Interested in the ‘Parasyte: The Grey’ Dub? Here’s the English Cast
Su-in in Parasyte: the Grey.
Read Article ‘Shogun’s Anna Sawai Is Living Every Crafter’s Dream
Anna Sawai as Lady Mariko in a scene from 'Shogun.' She is a Japanese woman with long, black hair wearing an ornate floral robe from Feudal Japan. Other Japanese women stand behind her and flanking her.
Read Article When Will the Highly Anticipated ‘Ginny & Georgia’ Season 3 Arrive on Netflix?
Antonia Gentry as Ginny and Brianne Howey as Georgia Miller in Ginny & Georgia
Read Article Will There Be a Season 3 of ‘Heartbreak High’?
From left to right: James Majoos as Darren Rivers, Chloe Hayden as Quinni Gallagher-Jones, and Ayesha Madon as Amerie Wadia in Netflix's remake of Heartbreak High
Read Article ‘Cruel Summer’ Season 1 Ending Explained
Cruel Summer poster
Related Content
Read Article Interested in the ‘Parasyte: The Grey’ Dub? Here’s the English Cast
Su-in in Parasyte: the Grey.
Read Article ‘Shogun’s Anna Sawai Is Living Every Crafter’s Dream
Anna Sawai as Lady Mariko in a scene from 'Shogun.' She is a Japanese woman with long, black hair wearing an ornate floral robe from Feudal Japan. Other Japanese women stand behind her and flanking her.
Read Article When Will the Highly Anticipated ‘Ginny & Georgia’ Season 3 Arrive on Netflix?
Antonia Gentry as Ginny and Brianne Howey as Georgia Miller in Ginny & Georgia
Read Article Will There Be a Season 3 of ‘Heartbreak High’?
From left to right: James Majoos as Darren Rivers, Chloe Hayden as Quinni Gallagher-Jones, and Ayesha Madon as Amerie Wadia in Netflix's remake of Heartbreak High
Read Article ‘Cruel Summer’ Season 1 Ending Explained
Cruel Summer poster
Author
Vanessa Maki
Vanessa Maki (she/her) is a queer Blerd and contributing writer for The Mary Sue. She first started writing for digital magazines in 2018 and her articles have appeared in Pink Advocate (defunct), The Gay Gaze (defunct), Dread Central and more. She primarily writes about movies, TV, and anime. Efforts to make her stop loving complex/villainous characters or horror as a genre will be futile.