LOUIS CK GRAVITY FALLS

No One Even Wants to Hear Louis C.K.’s Voice Now, so He’s Being Dubbed out of Cartoons

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Since the long-rumored allegations about Louis C.K.’s predatory behavior towards young female comics were finally made public, he’s lost out on a lot of work. His entire career basically disappeared overnight. FX removed him from all projects, Netflix cancelled his upcoming special, HBO removed all of his programming from their schedule, his manager and publicist dropped him, and The Orchard sold his own movie back to him because they didn’t want anything to do with it.

Now, C.K. has been edited out of two old episodes of the awesome animated series Gravity Falls, because audiences aren’t just done with the idea of watching C.K.; we don’t even want to hear his voice. Too bad for him, because this was clearly the character he was born to play: a literal monster trying to bar someone from leaving a room and creepily talking about getting them to go inside his mouth. The character’s actual credited name is The Horrifying Sweaty One-Armed Monstrosity. So yes, perfect casting there.

The monster has been redubbed with the voice of the show’s creator, Alex Hirsch. The episodes–”Weirdmageddon: Part 1,” which aired in 2015, and the 2016 follow-up, “Weirdmageddon: Part 3″–are now on the Disney XD schedule in their new form. The rerecording reportedly happened about a month ago, which is commendable, because the New York Times story detailing the allegations against him broke only about six weeks ago.

You can watch a clip of the new, redubbed version above. You can also watch the original below, with C.K.’s voice still attached. Warning, though: I seriously wish I’d never heard this particular man say the words “going inside my mouth.” It’s likely to make your skin crawl.

(via The Hollywood Reporter, image: Shutterstock, Photoshop)

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Vivian Kane
Vivian Kane (she/her) is the Senior News Editor at The Mary Sue, where she's been writing about politics and entertainment (and all the ways in which the two overlap) since the dark days of late 2016. Born in San Francisco and radicalized in Los Angeles, she now lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where she gets to put her MFA to use covering the local theatre scene. She is the co-owner of The Pitch, Kansas City’s alt news and culture magazine, alongside her husband, Brock Wilbur, with whom she also shares many cats.