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The Mary Sue’s Favorite Posts of 2013

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  1. Allow Us To Explain Allow Us To Explain

    We've shown you the posts that got you clicking and talking in 2013, but now it's time to get biased. See, all of us here at The Mary Sue love writing for The Mary Sue in general, but there are some posts that we just love more than the others. Maybe something exciting happened. Maybe something disappointing happened and we relished the opportunity to write about it and discuss it with our readers. Maybe someone sent us superhero-themed sex toys. 2013 was a weird year.

  2. Real Things That Are Happening: Ben Affleck is Batman Real Things That Are Happening: Ben Affleck is Batman

    While Ben Affleck being cast as Batman may have been one of my least favorite moments of 2013, writing about it was one of my favorites. Regardless of my opinions, writing about superhero adaptations is enjoyable and I was looking forward to seeing what the rest of the community thought of it. Turns out we had a lot of feelings on the matter. —Jil

    Real Things That Are Happening: Ben Affleck is Batman

  3. Doctor Who Hasn’t Had a Single Female Writer Since 2008, And It’s Making Me Angry <eM>Doctor Who</eM> Hasn’t Had a Single Female Writer Since 2008, And It’s Making Me Angry

    As with Jill’s Batfleck post, the fact that Doctor Who hadn’t had a single episode written by a woman since 2008 (and still hasn’t as of this writing) isn’t something I was pleased about. But it did please me to be able to write about it, because the way industry sexism affects women in the film/TV industry is a particular soapbox issue of mine (can you tell?). My favorite part of this post, however, is the way you, our readers, took to the comments section to share your (for the most part) intelligent, insightful comments about the need for behind-the-scenes equality in film and TV and how that lack of equality has been bad for Doctor Who in particular. —Rebecca

    Read: Doctor Who Hasn’t Had a Single Female Writer Since 2008, And It’s Making Me Angry

  4. The Mary Sue Received an Interesting Superhero Package in the Mail Today (NSFW) The Mary Sue Received an Interesting Superhero Package in the Mail Today (NSFW)

    Barring an actual dragon being delivered, this special delivery from Doc Johnson will go down in infamy as the most talked about moment in the The Mary Sue offices (for various reasons). And possibly the most embarrassing. While opening a box with superhero sound effects on it, the last thing I expected to find were four themed dildos. But find them I did, and wave them around the office we might have. We gave one away at our New York Comic Con party in October and there’s a good chance two others will find happy homes at some point, but there’s one that will never leave my grasp. I’ll leave you to speculate.—Jill

    Read: The Mary Sue Received an Interesting Superhero Package in the Mail Today (NSFW)

  5. Our Favorite Internet Reactions To a Certain Event in Last Night’s Game of Thrones Our Favorite Internet Reactions To a Certain Event in Last Night’s <em>Game of Thrones</eM>

    The Red Wedding was painful for Game of Thrones fans, but anticipating people’s reactions was fun as hell for me and, I’m guessing, a lot of other people who read the books and knew what was coming. Thankfully, the Internet did not disappoint. Now I can’t wait to see what goes down on Twitter and Tumblr when Another Certain Event happens next season (it involves a hair net). Or when we get to That Scene that happens at the end of book five. Or… well, there are a lot of moments. Damn you, George R.R. Martin.—Rebecca

    Read: Our Favorite Internet Reactions To a Certain Event in Last Night’s Game of Thrones

    (pic by Tumblr user queenofthemummers)

  6. If You Thought Lord of the Rings Was an Epic Journey, Wait Until You Watch This Nerdy Scavenger Hunt Proposal If You Thought <em>Lord of the Rings</eM> Was an Epic Journey, Wait Until You Watch This Nerdy Scavenger Hunt Proposal

    This engagement proposal won me over for being extremely nerdy, well-planned, and super sweet. The fact that this one was sent to us directly instead of finding it on another site made it that much more special. But bottom line: If you liked it then you should have put the One Ring on it. He did. It was adorable.—Jill

    Read: If You Thought Lord of the Rings Was an Epic Journey, Wait Until You Watch This Nerdy Scavenger Hunt Proposal

  7. Archaeologists Discover 2,600-Year-Old Warrior Prince That's Actually a Warrior Princess Archaeologists Discover 2,600-Year-Old Warrior Prince That's Actually a Warrior Princess

    My #3 inclusion on this list was a toss-up between this story, where archaeologists discovered a 2,600 year old warrior they assumed was a man but actually turned out to be a woman, and that time The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug rejected typical standards of poster design by putting Legolas in butt pose instead of Tauriel. Both posts featured a warrior woman, a subversion of gender stereotypes, and a prime opportunity for snark. But I went with the archaeology post because A) SCIENCE, and B) it gave me a chance to use a Xena pic, and I can’t say no to that.—Rebecca

    Read: Archaeologists Discover 2,600-Year-Old "Warrior Prince" That's Actually a Warrior Princess

  8. I Don't Know Why DC Didn't Publicize the Heck Out of This Week's Batwoman Because [SPOILERS] I Don't Know Why DC Didn't Publicize the Heck Out of This Week's Batwoman Because [SPOILERS]

    For my personal three "favorites" from this year, I decided to something a little different than I usually do and highlight a sort of accidental three-part series on a story that was pretty important to me. And that's DC's mismanagement both of the character of Batwoman and her creative team in 2013. —Susana

    I didn't know that I was on to one of the most inflexible editorial edicts in the New 52 when I wrote this article. I just thought it was strange that, in the wake of a boycotting scandal over their recent work with Orson Scott Card, DC hadn't done any kind of marketing push for the most LGBTQ friendly thing to happen to their characters in ages. Kate Kane, the first and only gay character in Marvel or DC to headline her own book, proposed to her girlfriend Maggie Sawyer, one of the oldest gay characters in the DC universe.

    There were lots of possible explanations, none of which could be confirmed, but the truth was weirder than I could have guessed. DC wasn't publicizing the proposal because they had no intention of going through with it.

    Read: I Don't Know Why DC Didn't Publicize the Heck Out of This Week's Batwoman Because [SPOILERS]

  9. Creative Team Walks Off Batwoman, Citing DC's Refusal to Allow Characters to Marry Creative Team Walks Off <em>Batwoman</em>, Citing DC's Refusal to Allow Characters to Marry

    That news broke fully eight months later, when J.H. Williams and W. Haden Blackman announced that they were walking off Batwoman because of editorial mismanagement that made it impossible for them to plan long stories and craft character arcs. Stories approved months before would suddenly require complete rewrites at the last minute, and to add insult to injury, they had been told in no uncertain terms that though they had been allowed to write a proposal into Batwoman, they would never allowed to write Kate and Maggie actually getting married into the comic. —Susana

    Now, instead of an unpublicised representational victory, the story was a very public representational failure for DC, one in which, unless you were the kind of fan who knows every character who appears in the background of Justice League Unlimited, they looked like they were denying two characters a marriage because they were gay. At the time, I considered it to be more likely that DC editorial had simply decided that marriage itself was not compatible with the New 52. There were a lot of characters who were benched at the start of the New 52, and that pool includes at least half of almost all the prominent married couples in DC continuity. The remaining couples who had made a reentry to the new setting had their relationships retconned (as Lois Lane and Clark "Superman" Kent) or were suffering significant relationship strain and physical separation (as Ellen and Buddy "Animal Man" Baker).

    But without official word from DC addressing the matter, I just had my suspicions and the comforting knowledge that Williams and Blackman had promised that the approved scripts they'd just submitted would bring their tenure on Batwoman to a memorable, satisfying close.

    Read: Creative Team Walks Off Batwoman, Citing DC's Refusal to Allow Characters to Marry

  10. Didio Attempts to Explain DC's Marriage Ban; Will Scrap Last Williams/Blackman Batwoman Issues? Didio Attempts to Explain DC's Marriage Ban; Will Scrap Last Williams/Blackman <em>Batwoman</eM> Issues?

    Yes, and no, as it turns out. An un-billed Dan Didio took the podium at that weekend's Baltimore Comic-Con to explain that, yes, DC editorial has a blanket ban on all marriages in the New 52, because "heroes shouldn't have happy personal lives." I talk in these articles about how such a blanket edict does not mean the same thing to gay heroes as it does to straight ones.

    Secondly, Didio announced a genuinely well-chosen creative team would be taking over the book from Williams and Blackman but eliminated any goodwill I could have summoned for the ongoing series by also announcing that Williams and Blackman's last two issues would be scrapped completely, one issue into a three part Batwoman/Batman confrontation that the series had been building towards for two years.

    It's funny how one can consider themselves quite jaded and realistic about the value of the individual artist in the superhero comics industry, and still be surprised. —Susana

    Read: Didio Attempts to Explain DC's Marriage Ban; Will Scrap Last Williams/Blackman Batwoman Issues?

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