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Randall Munroe

  1. XKCD’s Randall Munroe Finally Getting a Book Deal for “What If?”

    Jesus, what took you guys so long?

    Do you enjoy the irreverent and thought provoking XKCD web comic, but wish you didn't have to get on a big scary computer to get more content from creator Randall Munroe? Well you're in luck, luddites! Also, we appreciate you getting over your technophobia to read these words. It must be so hard for you.

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  2. 40 Webcomics You Need to Read

    Power Grid

    Comics are wonderful, visual ways of getting a story across, and it goes without saying that we at The Mary Sue love them. But as wonderful as they are, grabbing issue after issue can add up. And yet the desire for more comics persists. Luckily there are plenty of creative, engaging, funny, complex—and free!—stories and gag strips out there for those of us who need our dose of sequential art. You just have to know where to look. Enter the Internet.

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  3. Randall Munroe Finally Finishes His 3,099 Panel xkcd Magnum Opus “Time”

    Dang, yo. That's a lot of panels.

    Webcomics typically adhere to the classic newspaper funny pages formats of a either a single frame, or a few panels laid out in sequence, but they don't have to.  Online comics can have a limitless number of panels, or just be comprised of one big "Infinite Canvas." xkcd creator Randall Munroe finished a single massive story of the strip comprised of 3,099 panels, and Geekwagon put it all together in an easy to view slideshow/animation that's worth checking out.

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  4. xkcd Comic “Click and Drag” Turned Into an MMO

    The other day, web comic genius Randall Munroe of xkcd unleashed a comic that was a different sort of amazing from his usual dose of amazing. Called "Click and Drag," the comic was able to be explored manually using the titular action of clicking and dragging, and hid many jokes, fun references, and emotional moments. The Internet quickly took to the comic, creating various maps and methods of interaction, so users could more freely explore and see everything Munroe shoved into the enormous, sliding panel. Now, with the help of GitHub user n01se, "Click and Drag" has been turned into an MMO.

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  5. The Future According to Google [Comic]

    xkcd gets its share of backlash from within the geek community for its occasional nerd-pandering ('hey, you like math and video games? me too!'), but it's stuff like this and the radiation chart that proves that xkcd cartoonist Randall Munroe is still the best in the business. Anyone can profess to enjoy Star Wars and Portal, but laborious, useful data-crunching is the mark of true geekery. Here, Munroe combines first-page Google search results for a number of queries about the future to paint a picture of the coming century. Oh, and when the nerd-pandering punchline finally arrives, it is just delicious. Full comic after the jump.

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  6. Jurassic Park Theme Slowed Down 1000%

    Soundcloud user Birdfeeder has added a new great to the song slowdown canon: The Jurassic Park theme slowed down 1000%. Listen below:

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  7. xkcd’s Updated Map of Online Communities

    Today's xkcd consists of a massive overhaul of the webcomic's famous 2007 map of online communities. Per author Randall Munroe's description a lot of work went into making this new map, from stat-crunching to sysadmin-cajoling. Aside from all of the new names on the map (including our sister site Mediaite, which launched just last year, but is now ensconced right between the liberal and conservative blogs, at the mouth of the Sea of Flame), the most interesting thing about this map is that Munroe has discarded raw traffic as his main metric. Instead, this is a map of "total social activity in a community."
    Communities rise and fall, and total membership numbers are no longer a good measure of a community's current size and health. This updated map uses size to represent total social activity in a community - that is, how much talking, playing, sharing, or other socializing happens there. This meant some comparing of apples and oranges, but I did my best and tried to be consistent. Estimates are based on the best numbers I could find, but involved a great deal of guesswork, statistical inference, random sampling, nonrandom sampling, a 20,000-cell spreadsheet, emailing, cajoling, tea-leaf reading, goat sacrifices, and gut instinct. (i.e. making things up.) Sources of data include Google and Bing, Wikipedia, Alexa, Big-Boards.com, StumbleUpon, WordPress, Akismet, every website statistics page I could find, press releases, news articles, and individual site employees. Thanks in particular to folks at last.fm, LiveJournal, Reddit, and the New York Times, as well as sysadmins at a number of sites who shared statistics on condition of anonymity.
    >>>Check out the fully sized map.

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  8. xkcd Takes a Color Survey; Hilarity Ensues

    Though he's best known as the author of cultlike webcomic xkcd, Randall Munroe has plenty of other hobbies: For instance, tormenting strangers by making them take an endless color-naming survey. Munroe grilled 222,500 willing participants on the names of 954 different colors.

    In the "men do things like this, women do things like this" department, Munroe found some ... interesting disparities between the color names most disproportionately popular among men versus women:

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  9. xkcd not Fans of HDTV

    In today's xkcd, Randall Munroe takes on one of the great consumer tech inducers of nerdrage: Namely, HDTVs, and their decidedly non-earth-shattering resolutions.

    As one commenter on the xkcd forums points out, "most laptop screens are, in fact, HD. A lot of laptops screens are currently 1280x800px (16:10) - perfect for 720p content. Though there aren't a ton of laptops that actually have 1920x1080px resolutions, almost all laptops are well suited to view HD content (a lot better than some people's giant TVs)."

    And don't even start on framerates:

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  10. xkcd Makes 4D Miegakure the Most-Sought Indie Game: What You Need to Know

    Today's xkcd prominently featured a plug for Miegakure, an awesome-looking 4D indie game that xkcd's heroic stick figure said "hurt his brain." Naturally, that sounded like fun, but when we rushed out to look for a demo to download, which seemed plausible based on the comic (in the first panel, xkcd stickman says "I just spent an hour playing a demo of this 4D game called Miegakure"), we were promptly hit with ... a battering ram of information-free blogspam. Presumably set up in response to the sudden surge of interest in the game sparked by the comic. Including this gem of opportunistic nonsense in a post titled "April Fool's Day: Don't Forget!" "...but most importantly don't forget to always treat her like a lady. If you're bored you can always search out a miegakure download or a varudu movie review." Damn you, xkcd effect! Anyway, we dug into it a little more, and here's what we found out: The good news is, Miegakure is real, award-winning, and looks awesome, and there's a demo video (after the jump). The bad news: it's not available for download, there are no public demos, and there's no set release date or platform yet.

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