comScore
  1. Mediaite
  2. Gossip Cop
  3. Geekosystem
  4. Styleite
  5. SportsGrid
  6. The Mary Sue
  7. The Maude
  8. The Braiser

What's with the name?

Allow us to explain.

Mutatis Mutandis

Nicholas Hoult Tells us Why Beast Isn’t Blue for Some of Days of Future Past


Among the many events of X-Men: First Class was the extended origin of Hank McCoy, AKA Beast, who attempted to cure his visual mutant traits using some of Mystique’s DNA or whatever, and instead made himself hairy and blue. Eagle eyed folks have been given to wonder, if Beast got all fuzzy in the last movie, what’s with the shots of a normal looking Nicholas Hoult in the trailer for its sequel? Hoult himself has explained.

What’s happened up to this point is between the time of the last movie and this movie my character has created a serum which basically controls his mutation so his appearance is normal as long as he doesn’t get worked up. Any animal instinct or urges, that kind of brings him out. So yeah, he changes into Beast a few times throughout the story and they’ve done some great action sequences with him this time, particularly in the mansion flying around on these chandeliers and stuff.

Hoult also talked about how even when in makeup, his prosthetics for Days of Future Past are smaller than First Class, making the whole get up more wearable and less hot. Still, when in it he has the challenge of acting through a lot of layers. It’s safe to say that many folks will consider this a departure from Beast’s character, whose whole tragic mutant arc is caught up in the brilliant mind/inhuman body trope and how he believes himself to be fundamentally unloveable and cannot avoid being judged on sight. He can’t replace that trope with the Hulk’s, since he doesn’t actually lose control of his actions when he gets mad, just his physical form. On the other hand, this could be seen as an explanation for why the Easter Egg version of Hank McCoy in the background of earlier X-Men movies looked human, while the version in X-Men: The Last Stand was blue and furry. On the other other hand, if Bryan Singer doesn’t use Days of Future Past as a way to completely wipe X-Men: The Last Stand from continuity, I think he’s missing a golden opportunity. (via JoBlo.)

TAGS: | | |


  • Jessy Southard Strohmeyer

    There is no movie called X-Men: The Last Stand. (My denial is fully functional. Can you tell?)

  • Skol Troll

    “Meh, we gotta cut the budget somewhere.” or “I’m just not feeling blue and fuzzy today.” or “Some superfan went and saw an edition where we forgot the blue suit, so we have to make up a dumb reason for it.”

    Regardless… it’s just dumb. Between the World’s Fastest Mallrat, Kitty Pryde canon erasure, and whatever else they goofed, I’m waiting until Netflix. Because even Tyrion can’t fix this mess.

  • Anonymous

    And if there was one of its screenwriters certainly wouldn’t be allowed to write DOFP all by himself!

  • Anonymous

    They were originally goiing with telepathic illusion cast by Xavier until they realized it wasn’t derrivative enough.

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    Still haven’t explained how Xavier is standing though, have they? Or did he develop a serum for that too?

  • http://technicalluddite.com/ Hannele Kormano

    Soooo Beast is Hulk now?

  • http://www.justplainsomething.com JustPlainSomething

    “You mean like the Incredible Hu–” “NO, it’s totally different. Not at all like that character that should be in this universe but isn’t I mean WHAT character hahahahah?”

  • Important Film Maker

    Then when he gets angry, he really REALLy needs to sit down.

  • Jessy Southard Strohmeyer

    *whacks said screenwriter with a rolled up newspaper* You go to the corner and think about what you’ve done!

  • http://fandomnista.wordpress.com/ Robin S

    Man, why couldn’t it have been a canonical image inducer instead? Why make him Hulk II?

  • http://www.gradientcomics.com/ Rob Payne

    To be fair, part of Hank’s story has always been that he wants to change his appearance. He kept trying to revert back to something more “human” for years and never really became satisfied with his big blue self until Morrison brought in the idea of secondary mutations. Hank realized he was always supposed to be a big blue animal creature, he was just delayed in getting there before he began experimenting on himself. Depending on the writers, he could go from “mutant and proud” to self-loathing at a moment’s notice for decades. So, it makes a certain amount of sense if movie Hank is trying to reverse his transformation and not being totally successful. A decent arc in this or the next movie might have him finally come to accept his big blue self because to hell with everyone else, he’s gotta be him.

  • http://www.gradientcomics.com/ Rob Payne

    Despite what I just wrote, I agree. Call it a hologram for the n00bz and then call it a day.

  • Tony Ferris

    I think the Beast serum idea quite cleverly reinforces the notion that Hank is ashamed of who he is. He’s hiding. In real world terms; he’s the gay guy in the closet.

    The fact that he can’t actually contain his mutation with 100% success, that it emerges in moments of stress, or when his animal impulses become too strong, reinforces that notion even further. This is his true nature, and yet he’s doing all he can to deny it.

    Beast’s story is about his finding some peace with that nature, and becoming more comfortable in his own skin.

    It sets up a character arc that could ultimately lead to the version of the character that Kelsey Grammer played. A man who is far more comfortable with his mutation, and yet cannot help but be stirred by the prospect of a ‘cure’. A little flash of the self-disgust he once struggled with..

    That sounds like Beast to me…

  • http://fandomnista.wordpress.com/ Robin S

    And it can break down! Fritz because of reversed-polarity EM magdusers! Someone brushes up against him! There. Done. You have a way to see Beast human without making him a Hulk ripoff.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    They haven’t as of yet. I’m going with the assumption for now that any standing stuff is him in cerebro.

  • Jenevieve DeFer

    VERY early on, when the Beast First turned blue and furry. He DID have to worry about getting too angry and losing control of his Animal side.

  • http://www.gradientcomics.com/ Rob Payne

    If only those magdusers weren’t the only thing capable of stopping Magneto!

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    One shot I’ve seen his standing, and fighting being restrained on the arms by some people(I haven’t seen that one in awhile, so I forget who). I think that might be Mystique though, it looked kind of institution-y, and Magneto is allegedly in custody.

    I can see Prof. Charles Xavier, PhD come out of solitude to consult on a case, since no one knows he’s paralyzed, she could walk and masquerade as Charles.

    I hope so, I really want to see some “old school” Mystique ass kicking acrobatics in this one.

  • kbroxmysox

    So they changed Beast into the Hulk? Ergh..

    You know who could have been cool for this film. Monet. Or Cecilia Reyes or countless female character. Or what about Amelia Voght, she fits into the timeline. But no let’s have this be more guy centric and have Beast, who now has added manpain because he has to control his emotions, though you know Mystique will awake the beast within. OH THE PAIN OF BEING MALE!

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    It’s not that it’s not a good story, or that it doesn’t jive with the character. I watched the Astonishing XMen motion comic on Netflix, which was also the cure story, and he considers the potential of it for some time, and is torn.

    It’s just that’s too similar to Banner’s story, too associated with The Avengers, that it feels a bit like a rip off(which the comics did to each other ALL THE TIME). Especially with some of the other ripoffs(*cough*Pietro*cough*).

  • Anonymous

    “We decided shoehorning in a trite Jekyll & Hyde subplot for Beast was more important to the film’s pacing than anything involving Rogue.”

  • Anonymous

    That’d be fine if this was a pure First Class sequel that had time to flesh that out, but this is a time travel story with 2 dozen characters that has to connect the continuity of disparate films in the franchise. Why not keep Hank blue & furry the whole time so they can focus on the complicated bits of the movie?

  • Adrian

    No offense to the Rogue lovers out there but I’m actually glad they cut her out so as to not screw her up more than they’ve done since the first film.

  • Anonymous

    Or we could have Kitty Pryde playing a central role in the story – I mean, that’s never been tried before, right?

  • Anonymous

    It’s so depressing yet probably accurate to presume that any screentime for Rogue would would further ruin her instead of course correcting.

  • Adrian

    Also, to be fair, it’s the First Class cast that are getting the most screen time. That much has been known since the beginning so it’s not really shoehorning.

    Another plus for Rogue being cut is that she won’t have the death scene that Bryan Singer mentioned, though she might as well.

    This is why I’m so ardent about a reboot. Apocalypse is also going to be based on the First Class cast so this is probably the older cast’s swan song.

  • http://anna.balasi.com/ AnnaB

    I think Tyrion should at least slap SOMEBODY, right? Even just to try.

  • SorryNotSorry

    I feel that they made absurd excuses to get Xavier walking again and Beast in human form because it would be easier to shoot rather than true to the characters.

  • Tony Ferris

    In looking at Hank’s story coming out of First Class, it strikes me that this is
    a person with a great deal of self-loathing. He’s deeply ashamed of who and
    what he is. He spends large portions of that movie in fact projecting his own
    insecurities onto Raven, which contributes toward her assuming a harder lined
    stance on mutant politics. We now know that Hank didn’t stop messing around
    with that serum after it turned him blue. It would seem that he’s even gotten
    it to work, at least to some degree. My first thought was to compare this to a
    gay person being in the closet, but it’s more than that. This might more
    properly be compared to a gay person committing to drug regimens to suppress their sexuality.

    That by and large, is where this
    differs from Bruce Banner’s story significantly.
    Quite apart from the fact that the idea of a man transforming into a monster, after
    being consumed by his baser instincts could, hardly be said to have originated
    with Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, the metaphor at work with the Hulk is that of
    repressed anger and the Id. What we have here with Hank, is a metaphor about
    shame and the repression of self. The truth is, Hank isn’t transforming into a
    monster at all. He’s becoming his true self. That disgusts him, so he tries to
    hide it, but in times of high stress, or high emotion it becomes impossible for
    him to do so, and he reverts to his Beast form. This is very far from an attempt to emulate the Hulk, or piggy-back on the Avengers.

    It’s also worth noting that this has precedent in the comic, where Beast originally was able to use his serum to transform himself back and forth. It was only after he left it too long on one particular occasion, that he found himself unable to revert to ‘human’ form anymore.

    Furthermore, quite how the inclusion of Quicksilver, who was first introduced in X-Men #4, is the son of the X-Men’s greatest antagonist, and was part of the Days of Future Past script long before Joss Whedon suggested that he might be using him in his Avengers sequel could be described as a rip-off eludes me.

    But I wouldn’t be too concerned though, because this film looks set to supply us with the brattish, spazzy version of Pietro as opposed to the haughty, entitled, princely version I would expect Whedon is going to give us.

    Either way, DOFP is out first, so it’s Avengers 2 that has to worry about this.

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    Furthermore, quite how the inclusion of Quicksilver, who was first
    introduced in X-Men #4, is the son of the X-Men’s greatest antagonist,
    and was part of the Days of Future Past script long before Joss Whedon
    suggested that he might be using him in his Avengers sequel could be
    described as a rip-off eludes me.

    They were first introduced in XMen 4, but they weren’t retconned to be Magentos kids until long AFTER they became a part of the Avengers.

    And I remember, Whedon announced it first, not Singer. The giveaway is the fact that Singer is ignoring Wanda.

    You could talk about all the things in your comment, without tying Hank’s transformation to his emotions.

    The fact that they aren’t, makes it a rip off.

  • Tony Ferris

    They were first introduced in XMen 4, but they weren’t retconned to be Magentos kids until long AFTER they became a part of the Avengers.

    Oh yes, I’m aware of all that. Their association with the Avengers is undeniable (indeed it was in the Avengers that their parentage was revealed, courtesy of Roy Thomas), as is the fact that they are both mutants. It is also undeniable that since their introduction they have been inexorably linked to Magneto, and while it wasn’t until later that it was decided that they should be his long lost children, that relationship has been enormously important to the development of their internal, emotional lives over time. Magneto and Quicksilver even have a vaguely father/son relationship going as far back as the latter’s earliest appearances, before it had been decided that that was indeed the truth of things.

    And I remember, Whedon announced it first, not Singer. The giveaway is the fact that Singer is ignoring Wanda.

    You’re right of course; Joss did announce that Pietro and Wanda would be in The Avengers: Age of Ultron first (though of course we didn’t know its title at that point).

    Let’s examine that
    though:

    Marvel is incredibly cagey about details on their movies. Yet the director of probably their biggest upcoming release gave out information on new characters he was adding before he’d even finished the screenplay, and months and months before they would need to start casting, not to mention years before the movie would be in theatres.

    Remember: X-Men: Days of Future Past had already started production by this point.

    Is it conceivable – and to be clear, I’m not saying this is actually what happened – but is it conceivable that Marvel, knowing that Fox would be using Quicksilver in its movie, told their director to go ahead and let people know that he would be using him in his flick.

    Just to get a jump on it.

    I honestly believe that both productions landed on using the character on their own terms, without any consideration of what the other was doing. Marvel do have an advantage here though, in that they hold the copyrights on these characters, and remain producing partners on the X-Men movies, therefore Fox would have had to share with them their plans for the picture.

    As to Singer not using Wanda being a ‘give away’. I’m not sure how to make sense of that statement, but I will say that Singer had originally wanted Quicksilver to be a part of X-Men: First Class, but it didn’t happen for one reason or another. Ultimately he’s intrigued by the visual possibilities of the character’s power set. Nothing more complicated than that. That he’s Magneto’s son is a bonus.

    Not that any of it really matters anyway. They’re both allowed to make use of the character. I see no reason why they shouldn’t.

    You could talk about all the things in your comment, without tying Hank’s transformation to his emotions.

    The fact that they aren’t, makes it a rip off.

    There’s a need for drama here as well though. There needs to be the possibility of Hank’s true self slipping out. If he is truly concealing himself, then that needs to come with a certain degree of strain. It can’t be just a shot he administers every twelve hours or what have you, it needs to be a struggle. There needs to be that chance that the mask could slip. Tying it to his emotional state makes the most sense.

    Let’s look at what Nick says though:

    “…my character has created a serum which basically controls his mutation so his appearance is normal as long as he doesn’t get worked up. Any animal instinct or urges, that kind of brings him out.”

    ‘Worked up’

    ‘Animal instinct’

    ‘Urges’

    First of all, this screams repression of self, but more than that it speaks of something much broader than a simple rage trigger. It makes me think of characters like Julian in The Shield or David in Six Feet Under. Repressing there true selves until a build-up of stress or emotional trauma forces them to find release in self destructive ways. I doubt this will get as dark as that, and in this case it is of course tied to a superhero narrative, requiring action and excitement, so Hank’s release needs to be more immediate and explosive, but the metaphor would seem clear. It no more rips-off The Incredible Hulk, than that comic did The Curious Case of Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde which, along with some of the Universal monster movies, provided a smattering of inspiration for Stan Lee in the beginning.

    Sorry for being so long-winded. I don’t think we’re going to agree on this though… LOL

  • Tony Ferris

    Hello.

    Um… while this latest X-Men movie may have evolved to become something much grander than a mere follow-up to First Class, I don’t think we should make the mistake of believing that it doesn’t still remain, at its most fundamental level, a sequel to that movie.

    It is that cast, that time period, or 1973 to be specific which is of greatest importance to the narrative of this movie. The future segments, as with Claremont & Byrne’s original comic story, act as contrast and counterpoint. Of course the 2023 characters will have their own dramatic arcs to be played out, but they’ll be less personal I suspect, less individual, and more bundled up with the larger global, apocalyptic story that they’re a part of.

    It is the ‘73 characters, specifically those who were most prominent in First Class, whose personal dramatic arcs are of greatest importance to this film. There’s a lot of threads that were left dangling at the end of that movie. A lot more distance for those characters to travel to become the people we knew them as from the first few movies. Charles Xavier, Erik Lehnsherr, Raven Darkholme, and Hank McCoy. It is in them that the heart and soul of the movie rests.

    As it should be.