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Things We Saw Today: Pixar Wars

Things We Saw Today

A beautiful thing that will never happen, at GeekTyrant.

I don’t think the real issue is if these attractive women are pandering by stating their love for video games, but the issue surrounds the sheer quizzical reaction people have of how an attractive woman can be nerdy or geeky. It seems we might as well be debating the existence of unicorns.

If these had been male actors who had said they were geeks and liked Star Wars would there be the same incredulity aimed at them? When has anyone asked Nathan Fillion to prove that he was a geek? Are we more likely to assume that attractive men who claim to be geeks are being more sincere than when attrative women do so? If so, what does that say about geek culture, or society in general?

Eric Nath explores the general skepticism that tends to arise when women that are conventionally attractive say they’re geeky and what that says about the skeptics, at The Geekery Online.

An alternative 10 to the Maxim Top 100, at Flavorwire.

Wonder Woman makes perfect sense to men. The Amazon Princess from Paradise. It’s a perfect compliment to the fantasies of the billionaire playboy and the alien superman. Diana’s fatal flaw is that she is Woman Denatured. A woman with all the icky things that men recoil from taken out, as illustrated by her Pygmalion origin; the baby made of clay. Wonder Woman’s most reoccurring story is each successive writer’s attempt to re-define and in some way humanize her which- given it’s ubiquity- never seems to take no matter how many times she has her powers taken away or is forced to live undercover as a mortal human. It all comes across as a man’s increasingly desperate attempts at understanding women, giving her canon an irretrievably fractured quality.

A deft explanation of why my feelings towards Wonder Woman have always been so confused, in an article that is actually a really interesting textual look at Batgirl, at Girls Read Comics Too.

And now…

A Jane Goodall Lego minifig. From Maia Weinstock‘s minifigure recreations of science luminaries from all around Twitter, at Boing Boing.

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Susana Polo thought she'd get her Creative Writing degree from Oberlin, work a crap job, and fake it until she made it into comics. Instead she stumbled into a great job: founding and running this very website (she's Editor at Large now, very fancy). She's spoken at events like Geek Girl Con, New York Comic Con, and Comic Book City Con, wants to get a Batwoman tattoo and write a graphic novel, and one of her canine teeth is in backwards.