Elon Musk sits outside, staring blankly into the distance, wearing a shirt reading "occupy mars"

Elon Musk Wants Us To Believe He Suddenly Cares About Taking COVID-19 Seriously

Elon Musk spent the early, arguably scariest months of the COVID-19 pandemic downplaying the virus’ severity, complaining about how it inconvenienced him, and trying as hard as he could to put his workers’ safety at risk.

Recommended Videos

In March of 2020, he sent a passive-aggressive, guilt-trip of an email to Tesla employees encouraging them to come into work despite Alameda County’s shelter-in-place order. By May of that year, he was threatening to close that factory if he wasn’t allowed to force workers to come in. He also told workers their only options were to come into work in person or take unpaid leave, which would threaten their ability to access unemployment benefits.

Musk repeatedly whined online and in other forums including Tesla earnings calls, calling the virus and the response to it—both the government’s response and the public’s—”dumb,” “fascist,” and a violation of “goddamn freedom.”

Given all that background, it may come as a surprise to hear that Elon Musk now suddenly cares about taking COVID-19 seriously. All it took was two and half years and 6.5 million deaths worldwide.

Just kidding, all it actually took was for Musk to seemingly need an excuse to delay his scheduled deposition in his ongoing Twitter lawsuit.

According to The Hill:

In a newly public letter to the Delaware Court of Chancery, Twitter’s attorneys said Musk was slated to sit down for a two-day, in-person deposition beginning Sept. 28 but later claimed “Covid exposure risk” because the attorney interviewing him had brief contact four days prior with a person who tested positive the following day.

That deposition was related to the lawsuit filed by Twitter after Musk tried to back out of the sale the company that he himself forced via hostile takeover.

Musk reportedly volunteered to give his deposition remotely but Twitter’s attorneys chose instead to reschedule for this week. I’m of the opinion that more things should still be happening remotely seeing as the pandemic is still very much ongoing, and that if a person is worried about exposure at an event they should absolutely have the right to reschedule or participate virtually. I’m also of the opinion that Musk doesn’t actually care about any of this and was just fishing for an excuse. Twitter apparently agrees.

“Twitter’s attorneys cast doubt on Musk’s sincerity in declining to attend last month’s deposition, noting that the infected contact initially tested negative after seeing the attorney and that the attorney had not shown any symptoms and repeatedly tested negative for COVID-19,” writes The Hill.

“Trial begins in under three weeks,” that letter reads. “Mr. Musk is a central witness and Plaintiff is concerned he is seeking to evade fair examination commensurate with his role in the matters in dispute.”

In recent days, Musk has changed course yet again and says he plans to move forward with buying Twitter. However, for now, his trial is also still set to move forward, as neither party has filed a motion to stop it. It’s slated to begin on October 17.

(via The Hill, image: Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images)


The Mary Sue is supported by our audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Learn more
related content
Read Article Amid Warner Bros. Discovery’s Struggles, CEO David Zaslav’s Salary Tops Nearly $50 Million
David Zaslav at the 96th Academy Awards
Read Article I Have Three Questions for the FART Republican Caucus
Rep. Bob Good (R-VA) has a microphone in his face during a press gaggle.
Read Article With a Single Line on ‘Tortured Poets Department,’ Taylor Swift Has Brought All of Charlie Puth’s Past Controversies Back to the Spotlight
Charlie Puth
Read Article Surprise, Surprise, Donald Trump’s TikTok Flip-Flop Motivations Come Down to Pure Selfishness
In this photo illustration the logo of Chinese online social media and video hosting service TikTok is displayed on a smartphone screen alongside that of that of YouTube, instant messaging software Whatsapp Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Quora, Facebook Messenger and Snapchat.
Read Article There’s a Double Standard Being Applied to Conspiracy-Touting Aaron Rodgers in the NFL
Aaron Rodgers at Cleven Browns Stadium in December 2023
Related Content
Read Article Amid Warner Bros. Discovery’s Struggles, CEO David Zaslav’s Salary Tops Nearly $50 Million
David Zaslav at the 96th Academy Awards
Read Article I Have Three Questions for the FART Republican Caucus
Rep. Bob Good (R-VA) has a microphone in his face during a press gaggle.
Read Article With a Single Line on ‘Tortured Poets Department,’ Taylor Swift Has Brought All of Charlie Puth’s Past Controversies Back to the Spotlight
Charlie Puth
Read Article Surprise, Surprise, Donald Trump’s TikTok Flip-Flop Motivations Come Down to Pure Selfishness
In this photo illustration the logo of Chinese online social media and video hosting service TikTok is displayed on a smartphone screen alongside that of that of YouTube, instant messaging software Whatsapp Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Quora, Facebook Messenger and Snapchat.
Read Article There’s a Double Standard Being Applied to Conspiracy-Touting Aaron Rodgers in the NFL
Aaron Rodgers at Cleven Browns Stadium in December 2023
Author
Vivian Kane
Vivian Kane (she/her) is the Senior News Editor at The Mary Sue, where she's been writing about politics and entertainment (and all the ways in which the two overlap) since the dark days of late 2016. Born in San Francisco and radicalized in Los Angeles, she now lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where she gets to put her MFA to use covering the local theatre scene. She is the co-owner of The Pitch, Kansas City’s alt news and culture magazine, alongside her husband, Brock Wilbur, with whom she also shares many cats.