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University of Western Australia

  1. Male Guppies Hang With Their Ugliest Friends to Improve Their Own Chances of Getting Some

    With Valentine's Day around the corner, plenty of us are getting our annual harsh reminder that finding love can be really, really hard. We might like to say it's not so, but the fact is, whether you're a guppy or a human, looks count for a lot in the dating game. Like most things, though, looks are all relative -- the worse looking the crowd we find ourselves in, the better looking we seem to be. According to a study published this week in the Proceedings of the Royal Academy of Science B, guppies  looking for love long ago perfected the mating tactic of surrounding themselves with specimens less attractive than they are, a tried and true human trait on display in bars across the world every weekend.

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  2. Women Can Tell A Cheating Man, Men…Not So Much

     

    Cheating men may have reason to feel nervous that their significant others know what they're getting into on the side, while women engaging in flings could have an easier time hiding their indiscretions from their mate. That's according to a recent study from the University of Western Australia. Published this week in the journal Biology Letters, the study found that women were reasonably accurate at determining how faithful a man had been in his life just by looking at his face. Men in the same study, meanwhile, showed no such skill, thereby living up to the stereotype that we're never paying attention to anything. Way to go, dudes.

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  3. World's Oldest Fossil Discovered, Provided the Other World's Oldest Fossil Isn't Actually a Fossil

    A team led by Oxford's Martin D. Brasier and University of Western Australia's David Wacey may have discovered the world's oldest fossil. If further research supports their work, their discovery of what appears to be a series of cells fossilized in sandstone from the Strelley Pool in Australia would be about 3.4 billion years old. These microfossils have some implications beyond the title of being the oldest. For instance, according to the NY Times, the dating of the find would show that life started on Earth very quickly after the Late Heavy Bombardment, a rain of meteors that fell on our planet. Furthermore, the team say they found evidence that these cells may have processed sulfur instead of oxygen. If additional inquiry sustains their findings, the team's fossils will be the oldest ever found. Sort of. You see, there's these other fossils that might be the world's oldest fossils as well.

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