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Review

Doctor Who Christmas Special Review: The Time of The Doctor (Is Up)


This was it. Your last Smithmas. 

Normally, Susana does our Doctor Who recaps but, and I don’t know if you’re aware, recaps are a lot of work. So, since it was Christmas, she decided to take a break. And since DW recaps are her thing, I’m here with a review instead. All kinds of spoilers ahead.

We knew we were going to say goodbye to Matt Smith’s Doctor in the Christmas special but it was a surprise to see how that played out. We’re back on Trenzalore, the planet previously said to be the Doctor’s last resting place (perhaps it kind of is, in a way), and we pick up threads from the 50th anniversary special. The Time Lords are trying to peek through a crack (not just any old crack) in the universe, proving the events of the 5oth did, in fact, save Gallifrey from being destroyed. Well, there went the mystery most of us thought would be a major theme in Peter Capaldi’s run. All of the Doctor’s worst enemies are surrounding Trenzalore (though we only spy The Silence, Daleks, Cybermen, and Weeping Angels). Preventing them all from entering the planet’s atmosphere is Tasha Lem, Mother Superious of the Papal Mainframe. But don’t worry about her name or title because it basically amounts to nothing in the scheme of things.

Viewers of the last few seasons of Doctor Who should probably be used to that by now, and there’s certainly no shortage of hand-waving/we don’t have time/want to bother explaining this to you, stuff in the episode. Clara asks the Doctor to pretend to be her boyfriend, but it’s revealed here she would like that to be real (There’s a story idea we haven’t seen on Doctor Who before!). She starts to say she fancies him when they realize they can only tell the truth on Christmas. At her family’s Christmas celebration on Earth, we’re introduced to Clara’s adorable grandmother and…her Aunt? Her dad’s girlfriend? She’s not important enough to be introduced properly it would seem. And then there’s the moment Clara meets the Silence for the first time. I guess she’s never seen footage of the moon landing? Otherwise she would have attacked it. Also, why did she remember the Silence the second time she saw it? That undermines their entire purpose. As to the crack? “Hey, remember that thing we already closed the door on seasons ago? We’re going to now act like that’s not done because there was no other way to get us out of this whole regeneration mess. Ok?” And where did that Cyberman head? I don’t know. Perhaps worst of all was the casual comment the Doctor made claiming he has Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Has he actually been diagnosed with OCD? I don’t know, HA HA, aren’t mental disorders quirky?

Anyway, long story short, all we need to know is Tasha the one in charge. But she’s not really respected as much by the Doctor, or respected at all. Yes, after the Doctor forcefully kissed in-a-relationship/lesbian Jenny in “The Crimson Horror,” something many were rightfully outraged about, he assaults Tasha in the same way. She responds with a very Fifth Element “never without my permission” type of response and everyone just moves on. The Doctor has many faults, can we not have one of them be sexual predator? Some might say that’s a leap, but just imagine if you witnessed a man stealing kisses from women on the street. The cops would be called.

Let’s jump ahead. After discovering Gallifrey is within his grasp, the Doctor realizes he still can’t save them. At least not in this way or at this time. Instead, he chooses to stay with the people of Christmas town, protecting them from all sorts of attacks…for 300 years. That was the surprise. Realizing he was in a stalemate, the Doctor chooses to save this small community and actually take true joy in growing old. Of course that means ditching Clara (not once, but twice) because much like I’ve come to realize, she may be the “Impossible Girl,” but she really doesn’t have much impact in the grand scheme. Sure, she has “saved” the Doctor constantly, but we still haven’t been given enough in her episodes to really warrant her important. And that’s reiterated towards the end of this tale.

Smith’s Doctor goes on to explain what fandom has been saying for months, just in case viewers aren’t clear on the number of regenerations which have been used. Ok, uh huh, with you so far. And thanks to Clara giving the Time Lords a little nudge, the 11th doesn’t have to die-die on Trenzalore. It’s not quite clear how much regeneration energy the Time Lords gave him but I’m gonna guess it was more than just one regenerations worth. ”Love from Gallifrey, boys,” would have been a great last line for Smith, but as it turns out, there was more to do. Yes, the world was saved, Gallifrey is lost for another long while (or maybe Capaldi will find it in his first full episode, you never know) but there were emotions to exploit!

I’ll be honest, I got a bit teary near the end of the episode, but I imagine that’s what they were thinking when they decided to bring back Karen Gillan as Amy Pond one more time. What I’m sure they weren’t thinking was that some viewers might be crying because they remembered how good the show was at the start of Smith’s run and what it looks like now. As they dropped bow ties and other items in an orgy of nostalgia I couldn’t help think, “For a guy [Steven Moffat] who goes on at length about looking to the future, he sure does like revisiting the past.” Harkening back to a good number of 11′s memories is simply for the viewer’s sake and serves no purpose in furthering the story or saying anything about the character of the Doctor. It’s literally, “hey, remember all the fun we had together!” And wasn’t that what the Matt Smith special airing beforehand was for?

Looking at the big picture, the episode reads like a big pat on the back. Guys, did you know? EVERYTHING HAS BEEN LEADING TO THIS. All those stories we’ve told matter all the more because we threw them together and tied a big bow on them for the Christmas special! If you ask me, it’s a cheap ploy. Smith created something unique with his Doctor the last few years, and to harken back to his entire run instead of letting him stand on his own one last time was disappointing to this fan.

The question asked in the episode was “Doctor who?” but I have an alternate one. What is Doctor Who? Is it “The Doctor Show,” or is it a story about a magical man traveling through time and space, making friends and enemies along the way? If this episode is any indication, the series is about this one man who is so goddamn special everyone must love him and sacrifice even the most precious things so he might survive. Why must everything always be life-changing? Why can’t we just have fun once in a while?

How about that regeneration though? BAM! CAPALDI! I liked it, and I’m excited to learn about the new Doctor. I’d be more excited if I could learn about him under a different showrunner. But we shall see.

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  • Erin Macdonald

    I can’t decide if Moffatt is infantile or if he thinks the viewers are, but the plot devices are very thin and not well-thought-through. I can’t believe they brought back the “Doctor Who? Doctor Who?” device, which I think isn’t much better than my 13 year old fan fiction plot devices, but ah well.

    I had grown weary of Amy, so her return wasn’t emotional for me, but man, when the Doctor regenerated, the tears did flow… and I mean FLOW. I think I was overwhelmed at excitement for a new, older, quirky doctor, let alone new story arcs and I’m really looking forward to Capaldi. I hope an actor of his calibre (nothing against Smith’s ability) can really lift Moffatt’s writing. Ecclestone is my doctor (though Tennant often makes me question that) and I think Capaldi will rival this significantly, assuming the writing will hold up. Fingers crossed!

  • Benjamin Meis

    Before I start, the following is likely inflammatory, so here begins the rant:
    I’ll be the first to admit: I’m anal, picky and often quick to correct people. But I have to ask, are you just really angry, like all the time, about every little thing? I’m sorry, I try really hard not to comment on people when they give a review or anything, I work to comment only on the substance of an article, but all I got from this was “hate, hate, hate, every little thing can be interpreted in a bad way, let me show you how.”
    /End Rant
    On a note: I enjoyed the episode, I liked his send off, did think a couple of things could have been improved, but overall, pretty good.

  • Erin Treat

    This was a terrible wreck of an episode, filled to the brim with the worst of Moffat’s failings and excesses as a writer. All flash and VERY LITTLE substance. Massively confusing and rushed. Nothing was given any time to have the emotional weight it needed. Just, “Ooh look at this! Ooh look at that! Flashy stuff and things. Look how clever I am.” And don’t get me started on the sexism. The only genuine emotion I felt was in the last precious few minutes as 11 was about to change. Matt Smith was done a horrible disservice here although that’s kind of true of his whole run since it’s all been under Moffat’s watch. He deserved a grand send off, not this dreck.

  • Joshua S. MacDougall

    I liked it, it wasn’t perfect but neither was the End of Time nor The Parting of the Ways . Your review definitely brought up some great criticism of the episode but it didn’t stop me from enjoying it.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    To each their own on the episode of course, but I will never understand people telling us we’re too critical in our reviews. Reviews are meant to critique. I wrote what I saw/experienced. I’m not angry, I’m just disappointed.

  • http://www.wulfmojo.com Wulfy

    I’ll agree this article seems overly negative. Some criticism seems justified but ultimately I don’t care about little details like ‘is that her aunt?’ and ‘where did the head come from?’. If you’re going to pick on tiny things like that of course you’re not going to be happy.

  • Rijacki

    As usual, the episode began well and had some lovely bits of humor and some good ideas. Too many good ideas were started, never played out or only marginally did and were generally thrown away with nary a glance. Moffat retconned a lot even including his own creations (i.e. the angels touch, especially on bare skin).

    The last half to 3/4 was a lot of confused mad dashing around that was pretty pointless and terribly uncohesive. Even the regen, there was a perfect setup for it and.. it didn’t happen, probably because Moffat realised he would have had too much time left at that point, so the story meandered a bit more and then the regen was abrupt and sudden which wasn’t bad but I was fairly disinterested at that point. Matt Smith had more time on screen when he first appeared than Moffat gave Capaldi.

    A friend of mind likens Moffat’s story telling, when he has no one to edit him, as that of an 8-year old child: ”
    It’s like the racing prose of a 8 year old “and then, he..uh… blew up
    the space ship by waving his hands, and then, and… then… he got
    better, and… like, few away, and killed everything, and… like, saved
    everyone. the end”" When he has a editor (i.e. his stories under Russell T. Davies) and/or is adapting someone else’s story (i.e. Sherlock), he is a credible story teller. It’s just when he’s his own editor, his own last word, that he gets meandery and doesn’t play anything out well. It’s Lucas syndrome but possibly even worse.

    I, too, am looking forward to Capaldi and am hopeful for a new show runner.

  • Abel Undercity

    I was honestly waiting for them to reveal that Tasha Lem was actually a new regeneration of River Song. From where I was sitting that was where they seemed to be going with it.

    I believe the Doctor said something about having an entirely new regeneration cycle after the Time Lords’ intervention. So that football’s been kicked way down the field.

    Alas, poor Handles.

  • Benjamin Meis

    With respect, I think there is a difference between a critique and nitpick. Be critical, particularly constructively so, but I’m sorry this does not come off as a critique, only as a nitpick and like you’re specifically looking for something not to like about it.

  • Anonymous

    There’s a certain segment of Doctor Who fandom that is determined to hate everything about Moffat’s tenure as Doctor Who showrunner, no matter how non-compelling their arguments are. It’s unfortunate that this site has largely fallen into that camp. This episode wasn’t perfect, but it was probably the best Doctor-departure of the new era, and one of the better Christmas specials to boot.

    To be a bit more specific, one will have to stand for the rest: a complaint that why can’t the Doctor just have a fun, light-hearted adventure, in an episode where the character is known to be regenerating, is an example of the poor criticism at work here. Why try to have a measured response though, when Moffat bashing is so much easier?

  • Kristy

    He did mention he got the head at some market. And seeing as they are an
    enemy, I assumed he got them to play with them, find a weak point, find
    out about places he had not been. He says “missing (something) but with
    all the databanks) but he does clearly state it how it got it. Loved the name “handles”

    As for the rest, I am still trying to wrap my head around some points. I did feel it kind of thin, but maybe I am missing something

  • locuas

    you forgot the time that eleven Kissed Rory. second, eleven said that he got a new regeneration cycle, which was something established all the way back in the 25th special “the five doctors”. third, i tought it was ok. ditching clara makes sense(he already lost amy and rory against the weeping angels, so knowing they were there and knowing what was going to happen, it makes sense he would do that to clara). the one thing i was dissapointed is that i tought the episode would have revealed eleven was santa claus. yes, that would have been a little silly. but goddammit, i love santa origins! oh, and i was expecting daleks cybermen silence and Angels all working together to kill the doctor. so i was a little dissapointed that the weeping angels ahd so little screentime. i did like the idea of the doctor spending all those years in christmas town. it returns to the whole “girl who waited” motif that Amy had, and it shows Eleven’s character development from someone who was unable to stay still in one place for more of a few minutes to someone who willingly kept in place. i tought gallifrey being alive was confirmed at the end of the 50th annyversary, and i am glad they confirmed that, indeed, gallifrey survived. it takes a little out of the mytery, sure, bt i don’t think mystery was what it was supposed to convey, but hope. to give hope to the doctor that Gallifrey was out there.
    but then again, that is just my opinion.

  • locuas

    you forgot the time that eleven Kissed Rory. second, eleven said that he got a new regeneration cycle, which was something established all the way back in the 25th special “the five doctors”. third, i tought it was ok. ditching clara makes sense(he already lost amy and rory against the weeping angels, so knowing they were there and knowing what was going to happen, it makes sense he would do that to clara). the one thing i was dissapointed is that i tought the episode would have revealed eleven was santa claus. yes, that would have been a little silly. but goddammit, i love santa origins! oh, and i was expecting daleks cybermen silence and Angels all working together to kill the doctor. so i was a little dissapointed that the weeping angels ahd so little screentime. i did like the idea of the doctor spending all those years in christmas town. it returns to the whole “girl who waited” motif that Amy had, and it shows Eleven’s character development from someone who was unable to stay still in one place for more of a few minutes to someone who willingly kept in place. i tought gallifrey being alive was confirmed at the end of the 50th annyversary, and i am glad they confirmed that, indeed, gallifrey survived. it takes a little out of the mytery, sure, bt i don’t think mystery was what it was supposed to convey, but hope. to give hope to the doctor that Gallifrey was out there.
    but then again, that is just my opinion.

  • http://www.wulfmojo.com Wulfy

    I didn’t think it was amazing episode but I generally liked it’ mostly because it was nice to see all the threads of the Smith era brought together. The problem was that as a result it got a bit rushed and glossed over. When questions about the Silence and the Church have been hanging in the air since ‘Let’s Kill Hitler’ it would be nice to have more screentime dedicated to it.

    It wasn’t an overly flashy episode but to be honest after the epicness pile-on of the anniversary special it was nice to have a slow, sad episode. For me it mirrored the 5th Doctor’s regeneration episode (the best) in many ways: he’s aging/dying for most of the episode, tired and helpless but willing to sacrifice himself, and gets one traumatic vision of the person he lost before a quick explosive regeneration. It was if nothing else moving and poignant, and far better than the emo mess that was 10′s goodbye.

  • locuas

    Handles: THE GREATEST COMPANION OF ALL TIMES!

  • locuas

    Handles: THE GREATEST COMPANION OF ALL TIMES!

  • Benjamin Meis

    Handles was awesome :)

  • Benjamin Meis

    Handles was awesome :)

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    Well then I guess we also disagree on what is deemed critique and nitpicking. Again, I wrote what I experience, sorry that didn’t meet with your experiences of the episode. All I can say.

  • Charlie

    I found it a bit of a strange episode, I might watch it again before I decide if I like it or not.

  • Kat Murry

    I think Tim Martin, from the Telegraph, well summarized what went wrong last night (I think the episodes strongest parts were to Matt Smith’s credit.):

    “I imagine Steven Moffat and co frantically entering text into a huge and messy Word document marked “Later”. Every time a narrative lapse gets handwaved away, every time an episode thunks to a halt with its story strands waggling, every time the Gordian plot-knot gets sonic-screwdrivered into submission for the 60-minute limit, the writers just tap the remnants into Later.”

  • Anonymous

    I thought this episode had all the worst aspects of Moffat era Who and not enough of the good ones that normally make me overlook the clunky stuff.

    It pains me because some of the ideas were good and some had a lot of potential. Handles, wooden Cybermen, and bringing back Amy. Even the basic idea of The Doctor growing old whilst protecting a town called Christmas is kind of sweet but nothing came together and was too muddled to have an overall impact.

  • Cait Barrett

    I had huge problems with this episode. I felt, that the plot meandered around and stretched a pretty good idea (The Doctor having to STAY somewhere for a while) into a time suck. That part was dragged way too far and ultimately wasted a lot of time that could have been spent in the regeneration scene. I will admit that Matt Smith’s final words about “remembering who you used to be” were beautiful, but…I thought Amy was unnecessary. So, he was hallucinating? It felt like Moffat saying “remember this companion I created and is thus the best companion??” As it has been with Clara and Jenna Coleman, she got the short end of the stick. The Doctor was too busy with fake Amy to even have Clara’s final moments with the Doctor mean anything. She was the third wheel in the scene. And of course the show ended at 9:25 and they leave the regeneration to 9:24…central time.

  • Emerald White

    I loved it. To me it was witty, and I loved the connections between the
    episodes. There was references to past Smith episodes, as well as
    Tennant episodes, and the whole “trick send you back to safety and your
    family” thing Eccelstone did with Rose, which is a nice treat for
    someone who has been watching it for a long time. Albeit, sometimes I
    wish Clara had more substance, but I feel we got a deep insight into the
    Doctor, and his past. He’s 1000 and some years old, he’s bound to have
    billion connections, sexual, emotional, and romantic, so I felt the
    sexually charged connection with Tasha was justified. Besides, she kept
    trying to come onto him, and he’d fall into it, then bounce off in a
    naive manner. It was great fun to watch, the way they flirted, and the
    defining things about the Doctor for me is, the different relationships
    he has with characters.

    They connected things, and answered questions. It was like a big coming
    together of plot lines; the regenerations were addressed: Galifrey
    giving him another regeneration cycle was completely within reason,
    given they knew he was trying to save them. They explained what was
    trying to come through the crack in the universe, (just like the
    Cyberman had come through the parallel universe) which was really never
    answered, just that the Doctor had caused it with the TARDIS, which he
    did 13 times over.

    I will say, as much as I loved it, it wasn’t quite perfect. The regeneration scene was missing something,
    but at the same time, we’ve only had a few episodes with Clara and the
    Doctor, and we know she doesn’t travel with him all the time, so they
    aren’t as emotionally invested into each other as say Rose was when Nine
    regenerated into Ten, so it was bound to be a different experience all
    together.

  • Anonymous

    To be fair it was RTD that added in a second regeneration for Ten. At worst Moffat only added a single regeneration (The War Doctor). So really the chances are that even if he hadn’t Moffat would still have had to be ‘the one’ to deal with it at the end of Capaldi’s run.

    After all, he doesn’t seem like he’s ever going to give up being showrunner willingly.

  • KF

    Eleven seeing Amy was nothing new. Something similar happened as Five was dying and about to regenerate.

  • shulkman

    Golly… I’ll admit that there are a few things about the episode that I thought could have been better, but I’m not calling for anyone’s head, especially Moffat’s. If anyone thinks he’s doing a terrible job, then please, who should we put in the chair?

    I know! We can get the writing crew that worked on Doctor Who back in the late 80′s. I bet they are still available. (The ones that are alive). We’ll pull Moffat out, the guy who has helmed this beast during it’s most successful period in 50 years, and we’ll replace him with the staff that thought “Ace” was a noun, verb, adjective, etc.

  • Lup Lun

    Try as I might, I can’t help comparing this episode to “The End of Time”. That episode wasn’t perfect, but it was a good, solid adventure that delivered some jaw-droppingly awesome moments and reminded us of everything we loved about Ten. Whereas “Time of the Doctor” reminded us of everything we didn’t like about Eleven; the idiotically convoluted plotlines, the obnoxious habit of the Doctor having awesome adventures offscreen, the tendancy for payoffs to not match build-ups. It felt like the show’s chickens had come home to roost, and the henhouse fell in under the weight. Imagine that the show’s a bar which just hosted a wild, rambunctious, out-of-control party that left tables overturned, decorations smashed, and drinks spilled everywhere, and the host looks over it, sighs, shrugs, and sets about cleaning and straightening the place up because hey, we still gotta open up tomorrow. That’s what “Time of The Doctor” was; the tired, resigned cleaning-up phase where the showrunners have to paint themselves out of the corner.

  • KF

    I thought it was great. Very satisfying.

  • Jim

    The best part THE BEST PART. that nobody is talking about is that 300 years. So much room to play for fan fiction and official radio dramas with Matt Smith voice acting on it, all based around him and the forces and enemies he fought off and people he lived with for 300 being basically a warrior Santa Clause. AND, since he aged, whenever there is another call for some anniversary special or whatever when they want to have multiple Doctors again, Matt Smith, no matter how old, can jump in and be the Doctor again. No other of the old ones have been able to do that. (In fact I’m almost convinced this was done on purpose for just this reason)

  • Cait Barrett

    I think my major problem wasn’t that it happened, it’s that it excluded Clara from the scene and undercut the importance of her being there when he regenerates.

  • KF

    I guess I felt Clara had her moment with him as well, just before that. As someone who prefers Clara to Amy, I was very satisfied with the Doctor and Clara’s goodbye to each other.

    If anyone was excluded, it was poor old Rory. But that fits with how the Doctor often treated him.

  • Anonymous

    my 10 year old daughter encapsulated it perfectly, in my opinion…”they didnt give us time to cry.”

  • chris

    Im gonna jump in feet first and say that I was BORED by this episode and pissed its Matt Smiths last one and this is what they did. No, Im not a Capaldi lover, I dont know enough about him either way, but his 3 seconds on screen did not impress me. I cannot stand Clara, i think she is generally useless and like you said she makes no overall impression to the story. Seeing Amelia actually made me teary eyed because it made 11 teary eyed. But his ending was lackluster and the whole staying in Tenzolore (w.ever) was snoooze worthy.

  • .GONNY

    Ummm, Paul Cornell would do just fine for this fan. Moffat’s time is past due, regardless if it’s Gatiss, Chibnall or (knock on wood) Cornell taking over next.

  • shulkman

    I don’t understand how you can bash the writer into the dirt in one breath, then put Smith on a golden stand… Smith is a very good actor of course, and I’ll miss the hell out of him, but the best actor in the world can’t do a anything if the writing is in the toilet. As for the infantile thing… I’ve seen a plot device put on screen with actual flashing lights and signs attached to it, then seen half the audience run right past it and then listen to them for months asking, “How did that happen?” Could “Doctor Who?” have a better angle? Perhaps. Although it’s a 50 year old show who just spent a year reflecting on it’s roots… a mystery that is also the title isn’t too “out there.” There were a couple points last night when it felt really rushed, and that’s a shame… But I won’t call for the Writer’s head. Not when Moffat has done far more good than any imagined harm. And lay off Amy, she was just fine.

    What really gets me is some of these reviews that have half the story wrong as hell. MTV’s review is horridly wrong, so no… we haven’t gotten close to infantile yet. We are still too smart for MTV to figure out.

  • Anonymous

    Well I remember around the time it happened people wondering if it counted as one towards the doctors limited number so I assumed it was intentionally left as a possibility.

  • Cy

    The loss of Handles depressed me more than the end of 11 in this episode.

  • Cy

    There was plot point that bothered me. Wasn’t Gallifrey frozen in a moment in time? How is it possible that they’re broadcasting a question and a truth field into the DW universe while being stuck in a state of suspension?

    On a side note, Handles was awesome. I bet he picked him up the same place he got the Dalek eyestalk. Like a bad guy fire sale.

  • shulkman

    I don’t think it would solve anything. After a week we’d have 50% of fans who like the new guy, and another 50% who hate his ever living guts and wish the last guy would come back.

    I don’t know if “backing a writer” is related to britain’s football/soccer, but it’s exactly what it reminds me of. Who fans will burn the city down for the (showrunner) they like, and it’s war on everyone else.

  • http://cainslatrani.blogspot.com/ Cain S. Latrani

    Oh, look. We get to be reminded that Amy is The Most Important Person In The Universe again.

    Just what I wanted for Christmas.

    Oh, and I guess they made a little time for The Doctor to regenerate in there, but really, more Amy! Yay.

  • shulkman

    Were you this grouchy when Rose showed up over and over again?

  • chris

    dont they always remember the “first face they see”? I thought the Amy thing was poignant and touching.

  • Russ Rosin

    Things I like about End of Time:

    How Smith’s old age makeup made him resemble William Hartnell.

    The idea of the Doctor at actually living out a large chunk of his lifespan. The first Doctor was 450 years old, Doctor’s 6-9 were about 900 years old. From our perspective it seems like he burns through regenerations so it’s nice to see him get some actual mileage out of them.

    Thing I didn’t like about the End of Time:

    The “Story beats” feel the same. What I mean by that is if you strip away the story you can reduce it to a timeline. At 0:46:00 this is the part where the Doctor comes up with the insane plane to fix everything. At 0:35:00 this is where everything goes wrong and the Doctor tries to save his Companion by sending them back to their own time. That’s why the writing seems so inconsistent. It exists only to get to the next set piece.

    It feels like certain things that are set up as overarching story ideas are being rushed. Trenzalore felt very “one and done” considering what exactly happened at the end of last season. I like the explanation of why Trenzalore happened and what the exact stakes were, but having it all wrapped up in a hour felt rushed.

  • shulkman

    That was by design. They didn’t want it to be a super-duper-mega snot fest like The End of Time was. It could have been a half hour longer, and had a better spackle job on the “tying up lose ends” portion, but otherwise, it’s a 7 our of 10.

  • Christian Farmer

    It did feel rather nitpicky to me as well, like you weren’t even paying attention half the time, just watching it to say what you felt was wrong. If you’d been paying attention, you’d have heard where Handles came from.

  • http://www.wulfmojo.com Wulfy

    She was on screen for 5 seconds. Even if you don’t like the character that’s an acceptable intrusion.

    Personally I was really glad they included her. Amy and 11 had an incredibly close pseudo-parent/child relationship, it makes sense she would be the very last thing he thought of, similar to how 5′s last word was ‘Adric’.

  • http://cainslatrani.blogspot.com/ Cain S. Latrani

    Often, yes.
    That aside, Rose was never as annoying as Amy.

  • http://cainslatrani.blogspot.com/ Cain S. Latrani

    It never felt that way to me. Amy always came across as insulting and rude. Half the time, it seemed like was watching Amy Pond saves the universe instead of Doctor Who.

    Granted, that’s a personal view, but still. Felt that way, yet again.

  • http://coffeeandfingernails.com Coffeeandfingernails

    So frustrated with Moffat at this point. The special was like a shot of Nyquil, not at all worthy of Matt Smith. I did think Capaldi’s few seconds were great, but that just makes me thing I have another several seasons of watching Moffat’s shortcomings be papered over by a great actor. Would love to see Moffat and Clara gone–don’t think either one is redeemable at this point.

  • shulkman

    I’ve been thinking about that, and here’s my idea…. Think back to The Day of the Doctor, when the three of them jumped into the painting to get into the archive. Now, if the painting is truly a static place where everything is frozen, then how would you get out? In the Day, the three of them turned around and blew a Dakek out of the picture, then walked out after it. So, it seems like less of a “frozen” thing, and more like a “slower passage of time.”

  • Multiverse

    That was terrible IMHO. I can’t believe that we wasted so much time on a death scene for a cyberman head. They lingered on it like we were supposed to actually care about it. Why would the timelords send a message through all space and time instead of just beaming something only the Tardis can pick up? The village seems to be just hunky dory after being attacked so many times?
    Magical regeneration energy shot from the hands?!

  • Sabrina

    This episode was so boring to me – just one exposition dump after another with little bits of Eleven and Clara in between during which he treated her like shit. Ugh. I liked the last scenes in the TARDIS for the most part but 1) I feel so sorry for Clara being sidelined in favour of Amy’s ghost appearance and 2) I’m disappointed that there wasn’t a face morph from Eleven to Twelve.

    On a positive note I’m glad all of Eleven’s plotlines are now tied up and Twelve can start with a blank slate.

  • shulkman

    “Matt Smith had more time on screen when he first appeared than Moffat gave Capaldi.”

    You’re complaining about the last 10 seconds of the show, quibbling over two-tenths of a second difference.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    See, oddly enough, I consider what you just said to be nitpicking. I watched the show once and missed a small line about where he got the Cyberman head from. Honest mistake.

    How about the legitimate critiques I have on the treatment of women and comments about psychological conditions? Can we discuss those instead of how much everyone is bothered by me not liking the episode?

  • shulkman

    Here we go… a few honest to goodness reasons to be a little bummed by “Time”. (That doesn’t include empty statements about the showrunner.)

    1. Kovarian and the Silence. We had two seasons that were jam packed with cracks in time, and memory proof monsters, and the TARDIS blowing up, and the baby who would be River, and out of all that, we have this one big glaring question that remains unanswered… “Who blew up the TARDIS, why did they do it, and how the hell do we fix it?” It seems like a rather important thing to do since an explosion can unwrite the universe, right? Nah,we’ll just say it was Kovarian and then give you 5 seconds to accept it and then we’re moving on.

    2. Quite a few sloppy cuts. I kept spotting messy transitions from one area to another. Maybe they ran out of time.

    3. Overall, it felt about 25% faster than it should have been. And extra half hour would have probably helped out.

  • Anonymous

    RTD was the one who had Tennant regenerate twice, and there no way in heck I could see Eight fighting in the Time War. And Eccleston’s refusal to reprise opened the door further.

    But ALL of that aside, I’m going to repeat myself yet again on the regeneration issue: I’m glad its resolved. Why? Because the show is popular NOW, its doing well NOW, but there are no assurances that it’ll be doing as well in the future. Were the ratings to dip, the possibility was there that a regime-change at the Beeb could have made using the Doctor’s final incarnation as an excuse to cancel the show an attractive one.

    Likely? No, not at all, but possible. This is one complaint that I simply will not agree with.

    One other thing: I’d love to see a new showrunner too, but who the heck would be a *realistic* replacement?

  • Anonymous

    I don’t see Gatiss as being any less of a sexist than Moffat. Wasn’t Gatiss the one who wrote The Crimson Horror? The ep with the unwanted kiss?

    Personally I’d like to see what Kate Orman would do with the job.

  • Anonymous

    “It’s not quite clear how much regeneration energy the Time Lords gave
    him but I’m gonna guess it was more than just one regenerations worth.”

    Actually, in his final scene with Clara in the TARDIS, Smith’s Doctor clearly states that he was given a whole new regeneration cycle.

  • Anonymous

    EXACTLY! A lot of fans were rather pissed off about it at the time, and discussion was RAMPANT that ten had just burned up a regeneration with that stunt. Now we know.

  • Anonymous

    It was more than 300 years. It was 300 years the FIRST time Clara returned and the Doctor had aged. Then he sent her home again, and she returned later and he was even older.

  • Anonymous

    It was completely and absolutely fitting that Eleven would see Amy at the end. Hers was the first face he ever saw in that incarnation, and when he lost her he was shattered. There are quite a few things that went wrong in that episode, but seeing Amy? That was all too right.

  • Cy

    The painting was another huge plot hole that makes my brain hurt. What’s to keep everything in that painting from breaking out like the Doctors? Or is it just a 3d replicated construct of that slice of time?

  • Anonymous

    We don’t know what limitations the Time-Lords currently have or what difficulties they are facing in the pocket universe Gallifrey currently inhabits, so they may not have been able to make the message precise.

    As for the regen energy, have you forgotten that Ten’s Regeneration -energy devastated the TARDIS and caused it to crash? Or that River Song blasted a group of German soldiers with her regeneration energy? Regeneration energies have been shown to be potentially dangerous to others since Eccleston warned Rose to stay back in “The Parting of the Ways”, so that’s hardly a surprise.

    Also, Handles was awesome. Quite a few people have expressed the fact that they cared enough to make that goodbye worthwhile, so there you go.

  • Anonymous

    “The End of Time” was Tennant’s swan-song, not Smith’s.

  • Benjamin Meis

    I don’t think the OCD comment is that big of a deal. Yes, OCD is a legitimate condition and it should be treated seriously for those who have it, but also, hyperbole is a thing and it should not be treated as a serious issue. And what mistreatment of women occurred in the episode?

  • Saraquill

    Using the state of one’s health in a flippant matter is insulting.

  • KF

    If by treatment of women, you’re talking about the Doctor kissing Tasha, the kiss didn’t bother me at all. They’re clearly old friends with a history of flirtation and possibly more. Speaking personally, if I’d suddenly fought my way back to life against long odds and saved an old friend from certain death at the hands (or plungers) of a bunch evil robots, I’d be okay with that friend planting a single kiss on me. YMMV.

    I never got the sense that the Doctor didn’t respect Tasha. Quit the opposite, actually. I thought Tasha and the episode’s treatment of her were both great.

    (Please note, I’m not saying any of this in order to say I’m bothered by you not liking the episode. If you didn’t like it, you didn’t like it, that’s okay. And if that’s your sense of it, that’s the perspective you should write your review from.)

  • KF

    Yeah, that’s the impression I had. 12 more regenerations. Kind of like the Timelord giving the Master more regenerations (or the Master stealing more).

  • Anonymous

    i assume they are creative and intelligent enough to make a compromise, somewhere between those two extremes…and yet, we got what we got.

  • locuas

    the problem is, and i don’t want to sound rude, you didn’t really make a critique about that, you mentioned that you were bothered by it without giving a proper explanation of your point of view concerning the depiction of OCD. you didn’t like the joke about OCD, but you don’t give a context in why it is offensive, i don’t even remember they made a joke about that.
    About the mistreatment of women, i don’t really see it. you say the Doctor didn’t respect Tasha? that is in-character with the doctor, he does not respect authority figures especially when he knows them, unless he goes a very long way, such as, say, the brigadier. About the Kiss i will just say. We don’t know who the hell Tasha or what her relationship exactly, and a kiss will not change that. BUT i just don’t think it is as serious as you make it sound like.
    THe treatment of Clara, with the doctor having her go away, as i have said, i believe were completely justified, the doctor believes fully he is going to die here, so he makes Clara go away and be safe. and with the amy scene. I believe this come back with one of the themes of Eleven of growing up. Just as Amy didn’t see the Doctor as Raggedy Man towards the end, Eleven finally stopped seeing Amy as little Amelia and was able to “Grow Up” into the new doctor. It is a scene for eleven, not Clara. and, in the end, how do you feel about it is personal taste.
    Again, it is just my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    well said…it’s like any yelp restaurant review.

  • shulkman

    Time Lord Science… It makes the difficult stuff work.

    Of course, I’m still waiting to find out how mere mortals were able to blow up a TARDIS and destroy the Universe.

  • Anonymous

    “hyperbole is a thing and it should not be treated as a serious issue”

    oh my land! how i enjoyed that.

  • Anonymous

    it isnt always super obvious however, to differentiate between that specific and mayhap valid criticism and jingoistic crowdsourced pitchfork waving.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    Didn’t think I needed to explain why joking about a mental disorder was offensive.

    And yes, I wholeheartedly believe kissing someone without their consent shows a lack of respect at the very least. I also forgot to mention when he slapped Clara on the bottom as well.

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    It’s totally fine if the kiss didn’t bother you. It bothered me, and that’s why I wrote about it.

  • Anonymous

    what are you basing your “everyone” on? down votes? conflicting responses? potential insufficient layers of epidermis? its a critique (well it was, you seem to delegitimize it in your second paragraph), he can critique your critique without critiquing you, yes? the interpretation and appreciation of this piece of art is subjective, its not as though either of you are *right*, yes?

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    Ah, I wasn’t sure if by that he just meant one single regen or another 12 but that makes sense.

  • KF

    As you should.

    I actually disagree with most of the review, not just your take on the kiss. But I hope people who disagree with you don’t attack you too hard in the comments.

    You have a good holiday and a good new year.

  • Kristy

    Never a fan of Amy either, started watching the show with Smith and
    couldn’t get past her. But I went back and started with Eccleston and
    could tolerate her better. But I do see the point of her being there. No, I still don’t like her, but she needed to be there.

  • locuas

    Well, i believe you do, because not all the people who read this know what the joke was exactly, the context of the joke, or in which way it was offensive.
    and to be fair, it was eleven trying to pretend he was human AND clara was the one who told him to pretend he was her boyfriend, he wasn’t acting like he would normally do.

  • Guest

    Peter Capaldi has played a couple of roles in the Who universe before. RTD had an explanation for this planned out. When Moffat cast Peter Capaldi as the Doctor he phoned RTD and asked if the explanation would still work.

    I’m mentioning that because I am 100% certain that he would also have spoken to RTD about the number of regenerations. This must have been done with some input from RTD.

  • Kristy

    I don’t know…I have ocd, so does my daughter. I hate it, but it is not severe, but yes in therapy for it…I guess I could see how you might be offended (maybe – I don’t know, I can’t read your mind), but he wasn’t
    OCD and didn’t use it correctly, that is why I thought it was funny. Doctor Who, seen it all, “clever” but used OCD incorrectly. Makes me like him even more, trying to be human. Like you said “To each their own”. Maybe you should say “some people might think” joking about a mental disorder is offensive. Not all with said mental disorder do find it offensive. If you are speaking for yourself that is fine, don’t speak for everyone, please.

  • shulkman

    As far as the psych stuff, Benjamin just covered that quite well. Hyperbole, or just common sense, should be exercised. I’m sitting down to watch Doctor Who and forget about reality for an hour, and I don’t care which medical conditions they want to mention in passing.

    As for the “Assault”…. As I understand it, the vast majority of humanity knows better than to run up to women and kiss them without their consent. I also understand that theft is a no-no, and we shouldn’t steal and fly away in time machines. Fraud is also bad and yet he’s purchased winning lottery tickets for quite a few people.

    One thing that I do see, with The Crimson Horror being a great example of it, is the lady standing up and kicking the Doctors butt. To me, if Moffat was such a huge, misogynistic, woman hating, prick from hell whose mission in life is to make women suffer, I don’t think he’d be writing them as such strong characters, especially in Victorian times where Jenny is involved in things that are “quite outside of her station.” I dunno… I see the female characters that he’s created and I see better, stronger, faster parts than I see written for the men. Just think about Rory and Amy… which one was stronger?

  • shulkman

    “Capaldi’s few seconds were great.” What exactly reached out and touched you about Capaldi’s performance? He looked like a 55 year old guy, he mentioned his kidneys and not being able to drive. So, he’s basically doing a dead on impression of my Dad. He was on screen for about 9 seconds. I’m holding off until I see at least 35 to 40 seconds of footage before I judge his ability to act. I wouldn’t want to seem disingenuous.

  • locuas

    nah, bring the guy who had the brilliant idea of having six willinglt strangling his own companion.

  • shulkman

    I would say that only the “imported” parts, like the Doctors, or the Zygons, can affect the painting around them. (Because of course, the Zygons busted out too) But, for everyone else in the painting, it looks like reality. They are part of the picture and therefore don’t realize there’s a pane of glass only a few millimeters over their head. Perhaps if I had one of these pictures, done of my street outside, and I am in the picture (and part of the picture) then my “picture self” would appear to be walking down the street, and within the picture, that’s what I’m doing… repeatedly walking down the street, stuck in a moment.

    All just a theory of course.

  • Chiara

    Maybe I misinterpreted the review, but the way I read that specific comment (about why can’t the Dotor have a fun adventure) , it is more referred to the fact that with Moffat as a show runner, things keep getting bigger and bigger: eather than saving a planet, it’s the whole universe; rather than facing one danger, it’s a whole set of enemies. Everything just keep escalating. The episode itself could have been about the regeneration without having to go big scale and involve so many other things in a little amount of time.
    It did have funny moments anyway, which is proof that they can co-exist with a regeneration, however, it also had to go big scale again and this seems to happen every time now.
    Personally, I enjoy more those episodes in which the Doctor has a stand alone adventure that is conclusive in one episode and that involves saving a group of persons, or a planet even, but that doesn’t have to become the biggest catastrophic event that the whole universe has ever seen… and I have read that specific bit of the review to express a smilar thouht than mine.
    But then, YMMV, I have friends who prefer “big scale”stuff – or maybe I just read the article the wrong way,

  • Guest

    They remember the silence once they see them again. It’s not odd that she remembered. When Amy first ran into on in the restroom, she forgot it until she saw it again. When she saw it the second time, she was aware that she was forgetting which is why she took the picture. Of course, that didn’t really help her much since she forgot that she took the picture to remember.

  • http://www.Facebook.com/AaronVSteimle Aaron Victor Steimle

    Loved the sudden regeneration. I would liked to have seen five or so more Smith episodes before the big send-off, and also let the Christmas special stand on its own (using the Christmas special for a character/era/series finale just piles gimmick upon gimmick for me). Otherwise, this was a fine episode.

  • Anonymous

    Amy knew she forgot the Silence the second time she saw them. That’s why she took the picture.

  • Kristy

    He said nothing BAD, he said” I am here
    because I am OCD” or something to that matter. Is your point that the context of which he said “I have ocd” in the realm of a fictional tv show about a 1000+ year old time traveling alien is insulting to those with OCD? Because time traveling aliens CAN’T have ocd?

    If he said “I am here because I THINK I have OCD” then yes, being flippant. He said ” I HAVE OCD” Maybe
    he does. We don’t know. Maybe the time he was in the hospital with Martha Jones, one of the doctors diagnosed him with OCD. I mean, can you really say “no that is not possible, a time traveling alien over 1000 years old can’t be diagnosed with OCD”

  • Anonymous

    Also, I think the not knowing how to fly the tardis and the quick regeneration will be explained as the original doctor died on Trenzalor and basically giving a big reset.

  • Anonymous

    I also wouldn’t be surprised if he doesn’t know who Clara is when the season starts.

  • Anonymous

    Now that I’m thinking about it, with the 50th and the Xmas special, it seems like Steven Moffat has New 52′d us.

  • Jesse

    I was very VERY “meh” on the episode. Weakest of the Modern Regenerations by far. Including 8 to War and War to 9.

    Considering this is the Mary Sue are we just not going to talk about THE DOCTOR SLAPPING HIS COMPANION’S ASS. The kissing thing’s pretty bad too. But I didn’t end up batting an eye because I expect it. I also had the issue that Clara’s naked. A weeping angel touched her leg. THAT IS WHAT GOT RID OF AMY AND RORY. HOW DOES THAT NOT EFFECT CLARA?!?!?!?

    As far as the overall plot goes. It feels like Moffat expected another season with Smith. But got stuck when Smith said “I’m leaving after Christmas” leaving Moffat with two episodes to finish Smith. My response was “This was three seasons of build up?”

    Also, The full might of the Daleks could overtake Gallifrey. But it took 900 years for them to get to The Doctor? What. And wait. The Time Lords came through the crack? Ok. So by giving him a new set of regenerations (They mentioned “New Regeneration cycle” in the dialogue. So to answer your question Jill he’s got a full 13 set) they rewrote history so he never dies on Trenzalore. So….Clara never goes into The Doctor’s Timestream. This whole episode should have erased Clara from existence, along with removing The Doctor’s death at Trenzalore.

    But really I just sat back and watched it and couldn’t get all that invested. I kept looking at the clock and asking “Can’t 11 just DIE ALREADY” I shouldn’t be watching a regeneration episode wanting The Doctor to die.

    I did enjoy his speech about “We’re all different people. And I will always remember when The Doctor was Me” Which felt like Smith talking through The Doctor. Like how “I don’t want to go” felt like Tennant more then The Doctor.

    I didn’t like the massive regeneration…..thing. It screamed “Here. Have some Dragonball Z” out of nowhere. But I get it. A whole new cycle should be a massive outpouring of energy. I just disliked the look. I also sort of liked that the Smith to Capoldi was done in a second. There was no Smith, giant wave of energy, Capoldi. It was done differently. Which is good.

    I’m excited for 12 just because he seems like he’s going to be less random a quirky. Less ass slapping and kissing and more classic “Let’s go have adventures!”

    I just hope we don’t see Gallifrey again for a long time. Just maybe Time Lords leaking out now and again. *CoughTheMasterTheRaniRomanaCough*

    I’m also liked the reference to “The Five Doctors”. But yeah losing a Doctor should be sad and exciting. I should be sad to lose Smith and I’m really REALLY not.

  • Anonymous

    Handles was essentially like Wilson in “Castaway”…..

  • Chiara

    This makes sense !

  • shulkman

    As far as the Angels, we’ve seen before that they don’t always “zap” you back in time. They are a sentient being and have choice… it’s not like they are cursed with a Time Travel version of the Midas Touch. If they are on Trenzalore, trying to find out like the others what the signal is, then Clara would be more useful as a prisoner to hang on to, not just zap back in time.

  • shulkman

    No, they wouldn’t do that. It wouldn’t fit the lore because there wasn’t a new body transported, just some regen energy. As long as it’s the same body, then it’s the same person overall. The only difference is the individual personality quirks and physical appearance.

  • Anonymous

    thats the beauty of the internet, kristy, there’s loads of folks out here ready and willing to protect you even when you do not require it.

  • Rijacki

    And your complaining about one sentence, 15 words, in a post of over 100 words and several sentences? If the rest of the story had been strong, that small snip of time would have been warranted.

  • kazenotaninonausicaa

    I felt like the entire episode was exposition. When it was finally time to say goodbye to the 11th Doctor, there were so many red herrings and moments of wondering if “This Was It” that when it finally happened I wasn’t sad, I was somewhat relieved. Is he going to regenerate in the basement? Was that his regeneration in the clock tower? Is that Peter Capaldi on the steps? Oh, no, he’s young again. Sure. Oh, so Amy is here, we’ve got some more time. Okay, now it’s Clara’s goodb—nevermind it’s Capaldi! Well, that was it!

    There was such a big build up coming in to this episode and so many promises to finally have answers to plot pieces that have been lying around since Season 5, yet so little time was spent on any of them. We first heard about the Silence in the 11th Doctor’s first episode! And the answer comes as a throw away line. They’re priests? Say what? A renegade branch of the Papal Mainframe blew up the TARDIS before the reboot of the universe? The Doctor is just going to take the fact that they blew up the TARDIS in stride? How in the world did they manage it? And what happened to them? Is that renegade sect still out there somewhere?

    When you drag out a plot line/mystery for two full seasons (three years) and the answer is a single line in the middle of a long ‘let’s tie this up’ speech, there are some serious narrative issues that need to be addressed.

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera

    I know, that kiss, right? I mean, how was she mad? It’s like the show isn’t sanctioning men surprise-kissing women as romantic!

    It’s one of the many ways Steven Moffat has repeatedly revealed his prejudice against men. I mean, we’ve now had three episodes where the Doctor may be awesome, but he’s not awesome enough to save the day on his own! Clara keeps having to intervene (in her apparently non-essential way, though I’m not sure how you got that)!

  • Rijacki

    There were a lot of “lose threads” left over when transitioning from Chris to David and then David to Matt (and moreso in transitioning from one to the next in Classic Who) with the threads being given an opportunity to be tied or whatnot with the next Doctor or even much much later. There was no need to have -every- thread touched and tied in one single episode.

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera
  • shulkman

    “The episode itself could have been about the regeneration without having
    to go big scale and involve so many other things in a little amount of
    time.”

    Yeah, they could have done that but they people would complain that it was boring. The Doctor and Clara just sat there, playing pinochle, while nursing a wounded dog back to health using the Doctor’s remaining lifeforce, and costing him his life…. until the time lords stepped in and fed-exed him a baker’s dozen.

    I dunno… I think RTD had the right idea… never go on the internet if you’re going to write for DW. If I were Moffat and saw half the stuff being said about me, I’d probably give all the naysayers their wish and quit. I’m sure he’s living quite comfortably, he won’t be hurting for work if he wants it…. but, when the writers give up on a show, the show goes bad real fast. No one will be talented enough (to the “fans”) to pick it up out of the dirt, and eventually no one will want to touch it at all.

    I’ll give Moffat hell for real issues, like the lackluster editing at times last night, but I don’t search for a reason to dislike him.

  • shulkman

    If Moffat writes strong female characters, then he hates men. If his male character isn’t on his best behavior, then he’s a misogynistic pig. He can’t win. So, guess what? the Doctor is gonna lay a smootch on someone and Clara is gonna save the day.

  • shulkman

    Yeah, that’s one of my legitimate gripes, the exploding TARDIS. The assembled hordes of Ghengis Khan can’t get through those doors (and the TARDIS can lock you in a room, or in time, if she feels the need to) So how could Kovarian get into the TARDIS? And what the heck can you hope to use against something so massive? That was supposed to be answered last night. I expected a big reveal, or something more than “They did it.”

  • Anonymous

    Amy was in his life for over 300 years. She was the one who shaped his life. She was his, “Rose,” his best friend, and his mother-in-law.

    And, like River, he sees her in past, present and future. It couldn’t have been anyone else.

  • Anonymous

    I’ll never get why people (the reviewer and a lot of the commenters), who hate the show or writing as much as they claim to, still watch.

    It’s no wonder it’s so hard to get people into. This might be the most toxic fan base of any show on television.

  • shulkman

    I had heard the rumors that Tasha was River, but put that in the 99.9% not gonna happen column. River’s story is finished, almost certainly. I never say never, a writer can always write something new, but it wouldn’t make sense in the story. She had no way to cheat death, no regens, no body, nothing. I am still a little bummed that her last night was shuffled off in a minisode.

  • Shank

    I think this review is off in quite a few places. In no particular order:

    1). Why would Clara attack the Silence without a weapon? She’s not a zombie.

    2). It’s been established that once you turn away from a Silent you forget the encounter, but once you see one again you remember everything you know about them. This is how it’s always worked.

    3). Loads of people describe themselves as ‘OCD’. Speaking as someone with OCD, I agree it’s a little irritating, but it’s just something that people do, and, in fairness, from the point of view of an outside observer, the line between OCD and just plain quirky isn’t always very clear.

    4). In re: the Jenny-Doctor kiss, the INTENTION was clearly comic. It’s one of the oldest comedy tropes in the book. Have you never seen a ‘Carry on…’ film?

    5). Why wouldn’t Clara fancy the Doctor? He’s not a bad looking bloke, he has a time machine and he saves her life on a regular basis. Most women find a guy vaguely fanciable if he can play a musical instrument. It’d be a bit weird if she didn’t fancy him, all things considered.

    6). The return of the Time Lords can still easily be a major theme of Capaldi’s tenure, and I’d be surprised if anyone seriously thought they were gone for good. They’re the Time Lords, for God’s sake! Of course they’re gonna come back. The episode didn’t spoil any real mysteries as far as that was concerned.

    7). The mystery woman at Clara’s dinner (dad’s girlfriend, I reckon, though I’m not sure) isn’t, in fact, important enough to be properly introduced. She was just a bit of comic relief.

    8). It is clear how much regeneration energy the Time Lords have the Doctor. Smith said so. Enough for a whole new regeneration cycle. Cycle = 12 regenerations. Always has, ever since The Five Doctors in 1985.

    9). In re: the return of the cracks, I think the implication was that, while the Doctor fixed them in ‘The Big Bang’ the Time Lords were keeping this one open by sending their signal through it. In fairness, this could have been made clearer, by it isn’t contradicted by any previous episodes.

    10). The Doctor explicitly said he picked up the Cyberman’s head in a market.

    11). It’s a matter of opinion, but I don’t think that tying together the loose story strands robbed Smith of a final episode that was uniquely ‘His’. The Doctor was the focus from the very start. And while only Moffat knows for sure just how much of the episode was plotted out way in advance, the alternative of just leaving those loose ends hanging would have been far worse.

    12). The question is asked ‘ Why must everything always be life-changing? Why can’t we just have fun once in a while?’ Well, firstly, the Doctor is a momentous figure. Last of the Time Lords, greatest ship in the universe et cetera. He has certain obligations. With great power comes great responsibility and all that. By his very natured he can’t not be ‘goddamn special’. Plus there are TONS of episodes which are just about fun. The Lodger, Closing Time, Curse of the Black Spot, Vampires in Venice, Christmas Carol, Night Terrors, Dinosaurs on a Spaceship, Power of Three, Rings of Akhaten, Crimson Horror, plus a few I’m sure I’m forgetting.

    I don’t disagree with everything written (I, too, don’t think Clara has been very well characterised so far, although this is improving IMO) but I think that, all in all, this was a rather unfair review, if you ask me. It reminds me of the old joke:

    Q: What is the definition of a Doctor Who fan?

    A: Someone who really fucking hates Doctor Who.

  • shulkman

    Ok, I’ll try to be fairer. :) The Angels though… We’ve seen them not transport people before, and on Trenzalore, trying to learn about a message that’s scaring the hell out of the universe, the Angels would have far more use for Clara as leverage against the Doctor, rather than just zapping her back in time.

  • Shank

    Ha! Well said :-)

  • shulkman

    Yes, I think that someone is going to have to explain this to me. I am not seeing this in the context that you do. Normally, I’m very good at putting myself in someone’s shoes, but in this case, there must be more to the story, because it’s not upsetting the rest of us. I mean, if it was something offensive, like hmmmm… well… I can’t bring myself to type it, but it was offensive enough to where if it were tweeted by someone halfway famous, they would be the topic of dicussion for a week, maybe two. It has all the good parts, it makes fun of kids, disabilities that the kid has, etc. But, most importantly, the joke takes something “bad” and doesn’t apply it to myself… It applies it to a someone else, a kid. Making fun of yourself is a pretty safe activity.

  • shulkman

    It’s bad if I say “Ha ha! You’re dying of Cancer!!!!”

    It’s an entirely different thing if I say “Ha ha! I’m dying of Cancer.”

  • shulkman

    The odd thing is, the more I hear about this supposed hatred for women, the more I find myself thinking about Adventure in Space and Time, the challenges that Verity Lambert faced, versus now…

  • shulkman

    If you and Karen Gillam are in the street and a car is out of control, careening toward the two of you, and I can only rescue one…. Sorry, I gotta go for Karen, The Most Important Person In The Universe.

  • shulkman

    Hmmm, I just had a thought… I’ve been taking issue with “rough” transitions in the camera work, which I noticed quite a bit of in the Tardis, after the Regen, but before Capaldi… I may very well be a lot of late cuts made that they didn’t have time to smooth… because they wouldn’t be going between creative and intelligent at that time… they’d be working between happy and Oh god make it stop-sadness.

  • Anonymous

    I’ve become very disenchanted with the series. The whole overcaffeinated bee in a bottle mentality the Doctor seems to have doesn’t appeal to me. I know a lot of people love watching him flail all muppetlike across the screen, jabbering about this and that, but it went past saturation levels for me quite a while ago. Ditto the handwaving away explanations or distracting us with something shiny so we don’t ask inconvenient questions like “what the hell was that?”

    In moderation that stuff is fine and can even add some zing to a plot, but- for me, at least- it felt like a constant and unending barrage of noise and light that, more often than not, didn’t amount to an awful lot of substance. I know people will disagree with me and that’s fine. Heck, given that I bailed on the show around season six, they could rightly argue that I have no idea what I’m talking about and provide a whole raft of reasons to show me how wrong I am. But I’ve caught a few episodes here and there and other than the Doctor’s Wife they’ve just left me tired. And sad. This review is depressing because it mentions a lot of the problems I had with the show and makes it clear that nothing (or very little) has changed.

    I’m hoping Capaldi’s Doctor will be less bouncing-off-the-walls. I’m also hoping that his age means they aren’t going to have his Companions mooning over him. Or have him running around snogging everything (especially girls) just to make the fans squee. I’m not VERY hopeful, though, and the more I read the less enthused I get. I really wanted Capaldi’s hiring to mean the show would turn over a new leaf and become something I could watch again. And maybe it will. I’m going to tune in and see how he works out, but it sounds like, for the sake of my nerves, I might be better off skipping this particular ep. Or all but the very end. Thanks for the warning, Jill. ;)

  • Saraquill

    By “one,” I meant “a person that isn’t you.” I should have made that clearer.

  • Ben English

    I think River blew it up.. one last programmed instruction from the Kevorian that lay dormant in her mind until that moment.

  • Jen Rock

    I thought the long narrated scenes on Trenzalore were ridiculously slow and out of place and did not work with the narrative at all.
    I also got the distinct impression that much of the plot was borne out of Moffat going “…did I forget something? OH CRAP I NEED TO RESOLVE ALL THOSE PLOT STRANDS.” Or maybe better yet, it seemed as though he was saving it for Matt’s departure but then another couple of seasons happened and he had to make filler for all that time. Either way, did not work.
    The way Clara was treated – nudity + the butt slap? Gross. Awful. So inappropriate for a kid’s show. Everything and nothing happened.

    I did like the Dalek infiltration of the church, and it was interesting to see the Doctor stay at a place with purpose, but I wasn’t 100% clear on the purpose the whole time, and how is it the Doctor stays, what, 600 years? And has no plan the ENTIRE time? How un-Doctor-ish. This is a man that saved planets as a hobby since inception, but he couldn’t figure out how to save a town in 600 years? SIX HUNDRED YEARS.

    I nerd raged a lot. In the end, I liked seeing the changeover and the 60 seconds of Capaldi were fun. I look forward to more. But That jumble of an episode was weird and a let down, as most of Moffat has been.

  • shulkman

    Right, and that’s the same point I’m making. The Doctor, even if he was being serious which he obviously wasn’t, referred only to himself. He could have turned to the camera, looked at us, and said, “all you fans out there in tv land… you have OCD. Seriously, I’ve seen your comment boards and you’re all insane.” And even though it’s pretty accurate, it might offend one or two people. :)

  • shulkman

    I imagine he’ll do less bouncing. You get less bounce from a 55 year old than you get from a 25 year old. Matt’s Doctor was a bit of an homage to the 2nd Doctor, so yeah, a bit of the clown in there. But we also saw the non-clown Doctor at times. (Although, we never got to really have a “Family of Blood” moment with Eleven. Closest we got was Colonel Runaway. I really felt like Angels in Manhattan should have ended with the Tardis dropping off that last Angel into a star/black hole/concrete grinder.

  • Cy

    That’s brilliant. That fills the painting plot hole perfectly. Thank you for that.

  • Anonymous

    As an actual person with OCD, I was commenting on the prevalence of this particular “joke” last week. Let me just say I am so glad that it came up again this quickly. It’s a totally legitimate nitpick, the “I pay attention to detail, I’m so OCD!” thing is annoying as “I was just angry and now I’m happy, I’m so bipolar!” is to bipolar people. I mean, pardon my French, but hestie de câlisse de tabarnak!

  • shulkman

    I sit and rewatch it, noticing tiny things, like a big expansive set with a very small number of extras walking on it, and the choppy editing, and I’m starting to wonder if the budget didn’t bite into the episode. Day of the Doctor was practically flawless, and Time of the Doctor feels like it suffered for it.

  • ankharra

    The regeneration just felt so lame to me. Oh, here we go, have some more regenerations. It would have felt more poignant if it had been River’s regenerations that saved him. It just makes River’s sacrifice seem pointless.

  • Anonymous

    Oh thank you, it wasn’t just me. My family came to the consensus that it was like a one-hour recap of a previous series which was probably very emotional and well-written.

  • Anonymous

    We need more villains instead of revisiting the same ones over and over and over and over (and over). It’s the “too much of a good thing” bit again. The Angels were great the first time we saw them. They were OK the second time. And then it was just frustrating. And don’t get me started on the inundation of Daleks and Cybermen. Just because they’re the best-known villains of the classic era doesn’t mean we have to see them all the time. Imagine if they did that with the Master. Actually, don’t. I’m afraid that will happen.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think the kiss would be an issue in this context, on its own. The Doctor and Tasha clearly have a thing, which puts random kissing in a different context, and she told him off and it was resolved.

    However. Given Moffat’s history of dealing with critique, I wouldn’t be surprised if this was a passive-aggressive jab at the people who took issue with the Jenny scene. And that is just plain obnoxious.

  • shulkman

    Oh come on, if you’re gonna speak in French, at least translate it into Spanish before posting it. Google doesn’t translate some French all that well. :)

    As for people saying that, I suppose that could get annoying if it happened a lot. But honestly, I don’t think I’ve heard any sort of OCD joke in 7-8 years. Then again, I’m the guy who pays attention to detail (details keep people alive in pharmacy work) and I can get grumpy if staff are blowing off the chance to verify details in favor of BSing about the weekend. But, if someone were joking, over and over again, and associating Attn to Detail with OCD, I’d probably just educate them about the differences. Checking imprint codes against a handy reference to verify a medication isn’t OCD. It’s OCD when I’ve verified every pill in a 500 count bottle, and it impacted the performance of my job or life.

  • shulkman

    It only seems pointless if you never understood what she did. Lots of folks misunderstood what she really did. It was a little dialogue heave and people miss the fact that the Doctor was honestly, really dead for a few minutes, and she used every bit of energy that she had in order to get him back and cure him.

  • shulkman

    Can you imagine having that job? Make me a new bad guy for Doctor Who. That’s a tall order. 2/3rds of the people in focus groups will hate it because it’s new, and we don’t like change, we resist it no matter what. Hell, the only job worse than being the Head Writer is being the guy who comes up with new bad guys. And there’s no baseline to start from either. There is no real idea of what will resonate with fans. Why? Because fifty years ago someone grabbed a trash can, a plunger, and an egg whisk and created one of the most iconic and popular bad guys ever. If bad guy design succeeds with sheer ridiculousness, then where would your starting point be for a new one?

  • Saraquill

    My line of reasoning is that going “Oh silly me, I’m such a (marginalized group that’s often spat upon and often used as a target to be mocked)” is frequently frowned upon. I don’t see why this particular disorder should be different.

  • ankharra

    And even the Doctor said that she didn’t need to use them all.

  • Chiara

    Things can happen and it can be exciting stuff and a regeneration without involving every single time the end of the universe, the end of time, the end of all dimensions, all Doctor Who major enemies together in the same place. There’s plenty of DW episodes like that and they are definitely not boring and not about the Doctor and a Companion playing cards and drinking tea.

  • Anonymous

    I am with you 100 percent – when we finished watching my partner was bored and disappointed, while I was confused and annoyed. Thinking about it more, I am comfortable saying I hated it, although I can’t really say I’m surprised. Moffat has written some great stand alone episodes, no denying that, but his ‘arcs’ are awful and his misogyny stomach turning.

  • Anonymous

    Oh and am I the only one who found having the doctor use his regeneration as a weapon really appalling? Especially after the lampshades in the 50th with the war doctor telling the other two that the screwdriver is a tool, not a weapon. Ugh.

  • Anonymous

    My partner noted on Facebook that he cared more about Handles after one episode than he does about Clara after a season and a half.

  • Anonymous

    (Random Quebecois swearing that hopefully makes sense.)

    It’s probably not something you’d notice if you don’t have it, but you’d be surprised how often this conversation happens:

    “blah blah blah actually I have OCD.”
    “Oh, me too! Like when someone doesn’t close a parenthesis, it is sooo irritating.”

    Yeah, no. ಠ_ಠ

    Anyway, it’s less that it’s offensive or anything, more that it contributes to the image of OCD as a personality quirk rather than an illness? I felt like a fraud for ages, because I’m very messy, and that can’t be right. But OCD can be like, you’re walking up the stairs and you get this image of slipping and cracking your head open. Always. So you start avoiding stairs because they’re contaminated with that thought. Or “Did I turn the stove off? I turned the stove off. But if I left it on the house could burn down… I’d better check it. OK, it’s off. Wait, did I touch it just then? Maybe I should check it again. I’ll check it again.” So I think perpetuating that image about being super nitpicky, or whatever, is really unhelpful.

  • shulkman

    I can understand that. It’s sometimes possible to hurt someone’s feelings even when you’re truly trying not to. But, if we are going to live in a society where no one can possibly be hurt by words, then we better become telepathic, because it won’t work otherwise. It would be like avoiding cinnamon by only consuming white bread. You’ll avoid the cinnamon, but meals are going to get very old very quickly. So, before I get upset, I consider the what was behind the insult. Was there a person trying to intentionally cause harm to OCD sufferers by putting in a crappy joke?

    Most likely, no. Maybe if it were some no talent comedian, but I imagine that the writing staff of Who is more Major League, and less Bush League. Oh boy… ya see that? I used the term bush league to detract value from a “standard” and I may very well have offended someone, possibly many someones. But, while it might sound like I’m slandering the sparse interior regions of subtropical wildernesses sometimes known as “the bush” and by extension everyone who has, is, or will live there, I had no intent to do that at all. I suppose the moral of the story is, pretty much everything is offensive to at least one person on the planet. Heck, we call them pet peeves. Something we might not like personally, that doesn’t matter to the other 6.9999999 Billion. If you have a heartbeat, you’re going to get offended by something at sometime. And there are real, honest injustices in this world sometimes, and those are the ones we should direct our rage at.

    Odd thing is, the OCD “joke” seems like something that wouldn’t normally make it in just because it’s bad writing. There’s no story development to be gained from it. So, why put it in? What if Matt put it in for his little nephew who is being teased at school, called a spaz and whatnot and Matt thought, well, the Doctor could be a bit OCD…. It’s my last day anyways, I bet Steven will let me drop it in. It could happen.

  • shulkman

    I saw him on Torchwood, I considered watching The Thick of it, but I’m not a big comedy fan. However, I wasn’t slighting Mr. Capaldi’s
    ability to act. I was slighting the “Wow, 9 seconds of footage and he
    looks mah-vel-ous!”

    It just seems odd to praise (or vilify)
    someone who has been on the show for just long enough to blink a couple times. Believe me, if
    someone was on here, bemoaning the choice of Capaldi, saying he was
    horrible last night on the show, I’d have said the same thing…

  • shulkman

    They could program River, possibly, but they can’t program the Tardis to ignore the oncoming threat. We know that the consciousness of the Tardis exists throughout all of Time and Space. Idris was giving us quotes from future conversations… So, if you’re the Tardis and you know that if “XX” happens, then you are going to explode and take the whole of creation with you, then I don’t think the Tardis would allow XX to happen. It would lock the door, lock the room, lock time down in order to stop the person. I dunno… It should have been a pretty good story to tell.

  • shulkman

    The beauty of Sci-Fi programming… Fill in your own plot holes with imagination and logic. :) Of course, the Dalek falling out of the painting when the Doctors exit it puts a hole in my theory, since the Dalek should remain inside of the painting… But, how else were they going to make a splashy entrance?

  • Balboa

    Great episode. Love where the show is at. Moffat is doing a great job. Don ‘to really get the reviewer’s complaint there (if anything, the show has gotten better, particularly with the addition of Clara).

  • Anonymous

    1) Tasha is totally River. I know this doesn’t make any kind of continuity sense, but when did that ever stop Moffat? “You’ve been fighting the psychopath inside your whole life” + she can fly the TARDIS = River Song. Somehow. Hand-wavy timey-wimey, I’m sure he has an explanation that will get thrown at us in 10 seconds of dialogue 3 seasons from now that will make him feel very clever and just cause me to sigh loudly. Again.

    2) I was really hoping that at the end, when Clara hangs up the phone and walks into the TARDIS after the belltower regeneration kaboom, that it would be CapaldiDoctor standing at the console, saying something like “Handles reminded me I needed to rewire this. Good to honor the last wishes of old friends.” But I liked the sudden new-face, too.

  • Abel Undercity

    Never underestimate a writer’s capacity to bullshit, handwave, and outright cheat to get the desired result.

    Assuming, of course, such a thing is desired around the DW offices.

  • Anonymous

    I’m not saying new is bad. The New Era has had plenty of good monsters (other than the Absorbaloff, who at least had the excuse of being designed by a kid). The Angels and the Silence in particular show that “new” can be scary and interesting… unless you take the concept and run it into the ground, which is what I feel has happened. Even leaving aside the new stuff, though, there are plenty of Old School monsters who could be revisited and revamped, as they did in the anniversary special.

    I dunno. I wouldn’t mind helping to bounce around ideas for new monsters (or deciding which ones to bring back). It’s a good chance to go utterly oddball. Or freaky as hell. Might be a fun challenge to try for a bit.

  • shulkman

    The screwdriver is a tool, but regeneration is like dynamite. You can use it to help you build, you can use it to destroy… At the end of the day, all weapons are based on the direction and application of the release of stored energy.

  • shulkman

    I thought he might have said that, but I’m not finding a reference to it. Do you remember which episode it was?

  • shulkman

    I’ve never felt that the Angels were overdone, not really. They’ve been there, typically once per season. We had, Blink, The Byzantium, New York, and now on Trenzalore. The Silence/Priests can feel kinda done because they’ve been there for quite a while. I have a feeling they are being phased out anyways, as their story is ending.

  • shulkman

    There has to be at least a little reality, even in DW. I would say River’s biggest problem with returning would be the lack of a body, considering it got barbequed. I wouldn’t entertain it at all, but the fact that the Papal Mainframe is literally a giant flying computer, probably not too different from the planetary core of The Library, makes it a decent possibility.

  • shulkman

    Papal Mainframe, a giant computer flying through space… Perfect home for a disembodied computer program that’s otherwise stuck on a planet without any visitors.

  • Anonymous

    Frankly, if you grew a whole second person and DIDN’T use up at least one regeneration’s worth of energy, it’d be kinda stupid. I mean, if anything, that’s more work than changing a body that’s already there, growing a whole new one.

  • Anonymous

    No, it was likely a Silent version of the TARDIS. In The Lodger there was a quasi-TARDIS that was attempting to take off, and playing havok with the real TARDIS (and with Amy, trapped inside.) It turns out in Day of the Moon that this quasi-TARDIS was built by the Silence. The Doctor specifically mentions it’s the same model, if not the same one exactly. Presumably if the Silent-TARDIS can muck about that much with the TARDIS by mistake, it could produce the effects we saw when the TARDIS exploded. (In fact, River specifically mentions difficulty landing it)

    Sadly, the episoded Jossed my theory that the Silence instructed the other races in the galaxy on how to build the Pandorica, thus causing a way for the Doctor to save the universe, at the cost of him being erased from history. Thus neatly insuring that he won’t be around to answer the Question, and anyone he told his name to won’t remember. … Turns out, they were just sorta dumb and didn’t realise blowing up the TARDIS would blow up the Universe too.

  • shulkman

    Excellent points, all the way. On personal levels, a little education can help bridge gaps in understanding. But, just as devil’s advocate… Be cautious in assigning specifics, because you can hurt understanding at the same time you attempt to build it. Imagine a friend of yours and you tell them all about the stove, gotta get the stove. A couple years down the road, your friend meets someone who just so happens to have OCD too, but it’s less severe, less limiting than yours, perhaps it’s a minor light switch impulse that’s barely noticeable. But the new friend describes it in their own way. So, now your friend has two very different experiences and may very well be thinking that one or both of you are being dishonest.

  • Anonymous

    Okay, I know I’m sort of jumping in the middle of a conversation here, and that makes it sort of weird. But anyway, I do actually agree with you on most points. The Angels are a little overdone now. However, if anything, the Daleks and the Cybermen have gotten LESS screentime under Moffat than anything else. The Daleks have only been the main villains of their own story twice under Matt Smith. Victory of the Daleks, and Asylum of the Daleks. They’ve been present more often than that, but they’ve only had two of their own episodes. Likewise the Cybermen have only had one episode of their own, in spite of appearing more often. During Eccleston’s run, the daleks had two episodes (as did the Slitheen). Under Tennant, the Cybermen got a two-parter, as did the Daleks. The Daleks also got to be the major villains of two series finales, alongside the Cybermen in one of them. And they got a (god awful) two parter.

    They may still appear on a fairly regular basis, but they’ve been toned down a lot, actually. I think there was only one Dalek in all of Series 6, and it wasn’t even real. We used to get a full out Dalek episode every season.

  • Anonymous

    I can kinda see where he’s coming from. I mean, I was pretty majorly disappointed in the episode too, and even I was feeling defensive of it by the end of the review here. It might be a side effect of internet writing, or just the fact that people are so often angry on the internet. But the sarcasm (to ME) felt less… funny, or engaging and more… angry. I’m all for critiquing episodes. I wrote two or three paragraphs on everything wrong with this episode to a friend actually. While everything you said made sense (Except, minor nitpick, you can remember having seen the Silence when you see them again. It happened to Amy as well. Although it took her a minute longer to remember. I imagine the idea, given the rather militaristic church, is that you can “confess” to the Silence enemy secrets or the like, if you’re a double agent, but lie perfectly about it, because you won’t remember having done it. The fact that the Silence can leave subliminal commands helps, because it would mean the unknowing double agent would follow their mission directives without ever knowing) but it didn’t FEEL like rational critique, it felt like hate.

    That may well just be me. And the poster above, of course. It’s an unavoidable flaw in internet communication. I don’t hold you at fault at all for the interpretation, but I can understand where he’s coming from.

  • Anonymous

    Honestly surprised you didn’t mention when they were huddling for warmth or what not on Trenzalore. While naked. That was… uncomfortable (unless that was when the ass slap happened? I missed that).

    It was pretty clear to me though that he and the Papal Mainframe (who I’m disappointed to learn is not a computer) did a lot more than kiss before. Not to say what he did was okay (not that I remember it very well. I had poor audio when I saw it, and I was a bit distracted) but not quite the same as kissing someone off the street, and/or in a relationship with someone else.

  • shulkman

    For some reason, I still haven’t noticed this butt slap. As for the “nudity” it wasn’t actual nudity. They said they were naked, but they weren’t… I’m not sure how to get upset with “pretend” nudity. As for how Clara was treated, I assume you’re referring to her being dropped of at home a couple times? The Doctor protects his companions when he can, gets them the hell away from the big catastrophe. (Even if it never does actually work)

    Purpose for staying? He had to be there because the only thing the bad guys were afraid of was the return of the Time Lords. As long as he was there, and the bad guys didn’t try to melt the planet or invade, he would not release Gallifrey. It was intergalactic M.A.D.

    He stayed there for about 600 years, until death from old age became the primary threat. The Daleks knew that he had no regenerations remaining, so they got cocky at the end. You are right in that he didn’t have much of a plan, with only one option (the option he carried out, protect the town.) But it was a plan that worked only until he could no longer supply the threat.

  • shulkman

    I had not considered that one, and actually, with a little jiggle here and there, it fits better than you realize.

    If you remember the Lodger well, or if you watch it again, the Doctor is blasted by some force off and out of the Tardis.

    Throughout the episode, Amy is on the Tardis stuck in a loop and the Doctor is stuck outside, which would give an invisible, or (memory proof) foe, plenty of time and comfort to install…. a what? Bomb? A part from the quasi Tardis? The story has one hole in it though… the Tardis herself. She doesn’t seem like the type that would allow Doc to be in danger. And I don’t think she is going to be fooled by the Silence… At the end of The Lodger, the quasi-Tardis implodes and disappears from existence, so the influence of that machine is gone. However, all this happens right before the Pandorica/Tardis-plode, so the timing is certainly convenient. But still, how did the Tardis not stop the sabotage?

  • Anonymous

    Likely, I would imagine, due to simple inability. The TARDIS is a powerful machine, certainly, but fickle as well, and not entirely in control. My impression was that the quasi-TARDIS interfered with the Doctor’s TARDIS remotely. Possibly because the quasi-TARDIS is inferior, causing disturbances in the time vortex, preventing the TARDIS from landing. The TARDIS may not allow a Silent in, but her power in dealing with external forces is limited. Even her power in controlling her destination is limited. Going way back, to the second or third episode ever, the TARDIS is only able to give her passengers odd warnings and nudges to help them find a fairly simple mechanical fault in the fast reverse switch, or some such, that would have lead to their doom.

    As a sort of odd analogy, the quasi-TARDIS is a bit like a car that’s leaking oil all over the road (which, in this analogy, is the time vortex). In The Lodger, you could say it’s driving in front of the TARDIS and polluting the road, causing the TARDIS to slip out of control to a degree. Just an accident in that case. In The Pandorica Opens, it’s more like someone picking the right stretch of road, and driving in such a way to insure the oil will leak will cause the car behind them to slip off the road and crash. The driver of the second car would do everything in their power to keep from crashing, of course, but it may not be enough.

    As for the quasi-TARDIS, the events of the Lodger appear to be largely coincidental. While the Silence are memory proof, you can remember past encounters if you see them again. Amy would have almost certainly seen a Silent in the TARDIS, and remembered it on seeing them later. Also, the interference in the TARDIS there is caused by the quasi-TARDIS’s attempts to take off. It can be seen by the fact that the disturbances get worse in the TARDIS, and on the ground (as the Doctor is able to detect them) whenever the machine tries to leave.

    It’s hard to piece together the timeline, but I would imagine that the Silents originally built the quasi-TARDIS to go back in time to stop the Doctor reaching Trenzalore, and deliberately designed it to interfere with, and destroy, the Doctor’s TARDIS. When that failed, they kidnapped River Song as part of a second attempt (There are paradoxes there, but they’re similar to the ones involving the crack at Trenzalore in the first place, so they seem in the spirit of things), and took her back to the 1960s as a child to get the equipment they needed for her. It was around this time the Doctor showed up and tricked the Silence into ordering the human race to kill them. The Doctor seemed to think the quasi-TARDIS was the same one from the Lodger, and mentioned that they were about to find out how it crashed in that episode. So it seems likely to me that some of the Silence attempted to flee Earth in the quasi-TARDIS. For whatever reason, interference from the Doctor’s TARDIS, inferior design, or injury from being shot by the adult version of their own anti-Doctor weapon, they crashed in present day Earth and died either before, during, or after the crash. The quasi-TARDIS autopilot attempted to leave the planet, leading to the events of the Lodger. Which lead to the destruction of the quasi-TARDIS, and the end of its time stream.

    No, I haven’t thought too much about this at all.

  • Anonymous

    the facts that 11 and tasha had a previous relationship, that clara asked the doctor to act as though he was her boyfriend, that both clara and her aunt were ogling the naked doctor were unfortunately omitted for clarity and thematic sake.

  • Benny Bass

    I’m just an old softie… I enjoyed it, even though it hung together kinda weird. But I figured “ah, everyone probably needs a break”. Christmas allows me to be okay with all kinds of emotional manipulation!
    Plus, (as I watch the series with my ten-year-old), kudos for getting the “death” discussion going in younger kids’ heads in a pretty subtle yet meaningful way.
    But it was a great review, though! Thanks for putting in the time and effort. Even got me thinking. Yay!

  • Penny Marie Sautereau

    It’s cute that you think anyone cares. And Mark Gatiss obviously.

  • Anonymous

    It’s a review. The reviewer has a (largely) negative opinion on the episode in question. That opinion may not match your opinion, but it’s quite ridiculous to say it’s ‘too negative’.

    Jill is under no obligation to be positive about something she didn’t like.

    And ‘little details’? You could call absolutely anything a ‘little detail’ if you wanted to dismiss it. I agree with Jill that things like ‘why the hell does the Doctor now have a cyberman head’ are important to explain, and that the accumulation of unexplained elements was distracting.

    Your comment basically amounts to ‘if you’re going to notice things that were shoddy, poorly thought-out and detrimental to the overall effect, of course you’re not going to like it’. Which yeah, obviously.

  • Cy

    I assumed they could also interact with the people and objects of that time.

  • Anonymous

    I think part of the problem, for me at least, is that the Daleks and Cybermen were so overused at first that it’s cast a pall on all uses of them and made me really sensitive (or paranoid) when it happens with other elements, too. It’s not like we need constant reminders that they exist or that they’re threatening. Heck, most of us knew they were dangerous the first time they appeared in the new series because that kind of scare endures, even through years/decades of nothing. Of course I also haven’t bothered to check how often they appeared in the old series, so maybe this is just continuing the tradition. I think I’d still prefer not to see certain monsters AT ALL for a while. Which also means no more mass gatherings of All the Doctor’s Enemies Combined. Did the show REALLY do that again? Even after the Pandorica thing? Was it just as much of a waste of CGI this time as it was last time?

  • Chiara

    Maybe they won’t do a complete reset, but the fact that the Doctor has received a new set of regenerations and that one line about how to fly the Tardis make me think they might try to reset things some way.

  • Ashley James

    My moments for dr who series so far:

    http://bit.ly/StunningStills

  • shulkman

    I’ve been playing with that in my head… When Eleven and Clara see the painting after it’s been unveiled, she said it was “an oil painting, but in 3d”. And Doctor said “Time Lord Art, it’s bigger on the inside.”

    So, to me, it tells me that it’s not a “photo” of Arcadia. It’s not like a Time Lord set up his 5000 Gigapixel camera that took a picture in the same way an “MRI” does, layer by layer, faithfully recreating every molecule of matter throughout, in miniature. (Let me know if the analogies fall apart, I’m not sleeping much.)

    If it were a photo, or something like a photo, a snapshot and duplication of everything in that area but taken with a Camera, then in that case, all the items within the picture should be able to move, although none would be alive because they’d only be images.

    Now, if the “picture” was taken with the Blue Cube, then anything alive within the field of view would be alive in the picture, although they wouldn’t be aware of their confinement. Only the people with the cube, who knew the photo had been taken, would know the “circumstances” of their surroundings. Also, the blue cube “teleported” living matter to the area inside the photo, so outside in the real world, the original beastie disappears, and if that’s the case, then why didn’t Gallifrey just go outside with a crap load of camera to zap all the Daleks into paintings?

    But, none of those explain how the painting is made out of paint, and yet is multidimensional. Gallifreyan Photoshop?

  • Anonymous

    Yeah, it IS pretty toxic that there’s elements like yourself that can’t stand the idea of others disagreeing with their reading of the show. I mean, who would want to be in a fanbase where other fans are going to tell them they’re wrong or not real fans for having a negative opinion on something Ugh.

  • shulkman

    Tried to pull up numbers, UK and US combined, since I’ve heard that season 5 onward is when US viewership exploded. But it’s not easy to get yearly ratings when the big special was out two days ago. All the results are for one night only.

  • shulkman

    It depends on what you’re critiquing… There’s a lot of Moffat bashing on here that seems for be for the sake of bashing. Some people “get offended” by something because they want a reason to be angry. I’ve never seen people so upset over a spontaneous kiss in my life. I could go kiss the first strange woman I found and she’d probably be less angry than some folks on here. But, it seems like a hell of a reach for something to get upset about. There were real, honest to god things to be upset about with the episode, but they aren’t are real things that everyone would experience in the same way, like a cluster of shoddy camera transitions towards the end, or the “explanation” of Madame Kovarian and two seasons’s worth of mysteries, spoken about for 8 seconds… (Tardis exploding should have had an explanation, possibly it’s own episode)

  • shulkman

    I think that was meant more as inane opening banter, or as a minor plot point. (The Tardis gets a little cranky, seemingly in response to the regeneration.) We’ve seen the Tardis act up before, independent of the Doctor, especially when the Doctor is trying to break the rules. Maybe she is refusing to recognize the new guy as her Doctor. (you can take the story further, but in all reality, if the Tardis was going to have a real issue, then shouldn’t she have freaked out earlier when a Time Lord who *was* out of Regens walked into her and got a massive facelift, losing 600 years in the blink of an eye?

  • Rijacki

    It might be because we weren’t ‘forced’ to care about Handles like the build up for Clara as “The Impossible Girl”. I rather liked Clara in the first episode she was in, before she was the great mystery. With that episode I was looking forward to her being the new companion. But then her first episode as companion, she was given far too much weight in the thin plot and that continued on each episode after for a bit rather like she was being pushed on us rather than letting us like her for her.

  • shulkman

    I will admit, I didn’t see much of a point to the “naked at church” thing. I actually sat there wracking my brain thinking if this was one of those bits of British culture that I might not get right away, kinda like xmas crackers, but the only thing that came to mind was the old Emperor’s New Clothes tale… But, while I can agree that it didn’t seem to serve a purpose (except to make them easier to search? Which would be a concern if you are the space Pope, and there was the very clear exchange between Lem and the Doctor about the Tardis Key. She didn’t want him going down there with any tech. But, I stop short at getting upset about them being Pretend naked and having physical contact with each other. It might have gotten a little weird if he’d suggested spooning, but the shoulder shake to warm someone up is performed pretty much the same way by everyone. But, it’s something that can always be taken the wrong way if you want to take it that way. If I walk outside with a co-worker and it’s cold and she’s shivering, then I’d offer her my coat, give her that shoulder shake thing, because I’m a bit old fashioned. I’ve never done the mud puddle coat thing, but I’ll give up my coat for a lady. But, if she wishes to, she could claim sexual harrasment because I touched her, on her shoulders, on the outside of them, in the internationally recognized manner of warming someone up. But, I’d still get fired, because I touched her.

  • Jen Rock

    It wasn’t pretend in the very first scenes where he is actually quite naked and after Clara comments on it, he goes “I thought you might notice.” in maybe the creepiest voice I’ve ever heard.

    I didn’t care about her being dropped at home, although it was a rehash of the first season of nuWho. Her treatment I was referring to was the above comments, the slapping her ass in front of her parents, and the saying goodbye to Amy as she looks on confused.

  • Jen Rock

    And that plan was rubbish. I just rewatched the 11th Hour, and in 20 minutes, the Doctor saved Earth with no sonic screwdriver and no TARDIS to help him, and it was spectacular. In this episode he had both of those things at his disposal plus a lot of time to think, and could only manage defense.

  • shulkman

    It’s all very well thought out, and it could fit in place pretty well, except that people would complain, “Quasi Tardis? One answer for the whole thing?? Well, Mankol/Moffat is a terrible, horrible writer and he should be replaced as showrunner! And burned! Burned at the stake! And he hates women. And kittens. ~~~~~

    There is one hiccup, because it seems that we were both wrong about one item in particular. I rewatched The Lodger, paying very close attention to Amy on the Tardis. While they are seperated, there are two times where Amy acts as if she has seen someone else, for just a moment, and then forgets it. It’s the same reaction that we see in the opening of Season 6 when the Silence actually makes their debut. I guess that Moffat intended to introduce them in The Lodger, but changed his mind at the last minute, and pushed their first appearance to within Season 6. It would make better sense… have a new scary alien to open the season with, get a little extra ratings sauce… And, if they had shown in lodger, the fans would have howled that they saw this alien, but we don’t know why Amy can’t seem to remember it and we don’t know it’s name and why, oh why would he write it into the Lodger, right before the Pandorica, Big Bang, and end of season, thus making us wait all summer to find out who they are. So, it does make sense, but because of their removal, we don’t make the connection between the exploding Tardis and the Silence being on the Tardis.

  • Anonymous

    Can we lay to rest the female kiss=assault thing? He did the exact same thing to Rory in Dinosaurs on a Spaceship and no one was as up at arms about it. Not excusing it, but where was the outrage then with married, heterosexual Rory when it was the exact same issue?

  • Alyson L

    I really hope the show gets better. The who Trenzelor thing drove me nuts. Seriously there was more narration and explanation then time of Smith on screen. They tried to parallel Clara with Rose WAY TOO MUCH near the end. Oh, he sends her home and then she comes back! She saves him with speaking into a crack. She begs him not to change. She is in love with him and they are soul mates. blah blah blah… One of the things that was nice about after Rose is his companions were his friends. I wish River hadn’t been tossed to the side.

    They do so much build up to these episodes now that they are let downs by the time they actually air. This one felt rush, unoriginal (let’s have both Tennett & Smith die when dealing with the Time Lords attempting to come back and a mysterious signal!), narrow (let’s only show Amy Pond, screw Rory… sorry.. I just disliked it so damned much. I will probably watch part of the next season but if it continues with these huge ass ideas and then major let downs while trying to be something more… I am done. I’m exhausted with the overplay, over hype, and well… just give me a regular season without every episode being a major event.

  • shulkman

    I can see your point, however… Fixing things in Eleventh hour wasn’t that hard. There were alien guards capable of flight surrounding the planet, monitoring all frequencies. All the Doctor had to do was find and identify Zero for them. Just one prisoner and the planet is safe. In Time, you had the Doctor in a village that seems to be stuck on a loop in a Victorian Christmas. No technology like in hour, but he was facing a huge mass of ships, independent of each other except for their fear of the Time War. Pretty tough to fight against that. Meanwhile, he spent 600 years on an alien planet and they didn’t seem to build anything, or invent anything. He whittles wood throughout the 600 year period. In fact, it would make perfect sense if… *I may actually be spoiling next season’s opening*… the village was literally stuck in time, repeating the same night over and over. The sun comes up *beep* the day resets and the sun goes down, and it bounces sunset to sunup, sunup to sunset… Over and over for 600 years, The massive armada of ships over their head give up and go home eventually, but the town never shows damage from attacks, never seems to be repairing anything… So, what if that village was a small bulge? A little teeny bit of Gallifrey projected through from the crack? It would explain why everyone feels a bit cheated… We’ve only seen half the story so far….

  • shulkman

    He’s never been overly concerned with nudity. He got naked in the opener when he changed his clothes, saying “turn around if it bothers you.” If you think about it, someone who is 900 years old has probably gotten past embarrassment about his body. Slapping Clara’s butt was him playing his role as Clara’s “boyfriend,” as she requested. He isn’t going to do it well… Whenever he tried to “act” human and fit in, he stuck out like a sore thumb.

  • Anonymous

    Well, now, that’s perfectly fair. I don’t believe, in my somewhat limited experience of the classic series, that other alien threats usually guest starred. Though that might be partly due to different storytelling conventions and budget stuff at the time. I have mixed feelings. In some ways, I like seeing that they’re around occasionally as a contrast to the RTD years, when the Daleks had to be completely, or near completely destroyed every encounter, and the Cybermen were locked away in a parallel universe (in spite of nothing having happened to the original cybermen that anyone seemed to mention). So every single time you had to use them, you had to invent some way to get them back in the game.

    Now that we’ve thankfully cut that out, they are sort of… out there. And up to no good. I actually liked the way the Cybermen were handled in Good Man Goes to War. Of course, you’re perfectly free to disagree. Fortunately, I imagine your wish for more classic villains may come true. We’ve had the Great Intelligence, and the Zygons recently. Oh, and the Ice Warriors. Or at least one of them. I mean, I can see that for the most part these are also one-offs, not really bringing back old classic enemies long term. But at least the Silurians seem to have made a fairly decent return, in spite of their anemic reintroduction episode.

  • Kristy

    :-) The thing with OCD is probably 99.9 percent of the people who have it
    KNOW they have it even before they are diagnosed. Maybe 1/2 of those people seek treatment because it interferes with their life. It doesn’t always, or maybe does, only slightly, at times.

    If people who suffer from OCD can be
    aware without some medical expert telling them, why can’t the Doctor
    himself be self aware of his own personal mental health issues without hearing it from
    a medical expert in order to confirm it and make it “real”?

    The funny thing is, maybe Martha Jones told him he was, after all didn’t she
    earn a medical degree? Must we actually see the exchange in order to believe it is ‘real’?

  • Anonymous

    oh matt smith can always return all over time and space with the tardis: or was there already an explanation where/how he spent the 200 years before River shoots him in season 6?

  • shulkman

    I have a theory that we’ve only seen half of the Trenzalore story, and if things happen as I think they might, then it will make sense. I don’t know that the companions went to platonic land really. Martha fell hard for the Doctor. Donna was the only one that seemed truly platonic, without romantic interest from either side, but a strong friendship. I don’t feel like River was tossed to the side… she died, as she had to. The Doctor couldn’t tell her about what happened there. All he could do was give her a screwdriver that would save her. (And preserve the timeline.)

  • Anonymous

    Thank you! The Doctor is going to lay a smooch on SOMEONE. And the first time i really noticed it as an on-the-mouth thing vs a forehead thing was with Rory (Dinosaurs on a Spaceship), who was just as “not interested” as Jenny.

  • Cy

    The Dalek didn’t pop out of the painting as an oil painted model. I’d guess there’s a perception filter on the frame or canvas that makes the viewer perceive it as an oil painting.

  • shulkman

    Perception filter is too easy, and the Doctor would have said that in the gallery instead of “Time Lord Art, it’s bigger on the inside.” Hell, perception filter is a go to for everything else, so if the painting had a filter, he’d have said “Perception Filter… it only looks like oil paint.” I mean, we will probably never get an explanation of the painting, but in order for a theory to fit the narrative, it can’t be something we see used all the time.

    On another subject, I may have figured out the big secret behind the village on Trenzalore. The theory fits so well that it could be a spoiler, and if I’m right, then it explains why this episode felt so half-done, with gaping plot holes and no explanations.

  • Anonymous

    OK, that’s true. Maybe I wasn’t being specific enough. The thing is that it’s a cycle; you have a disturbing thought or feeling and then, say, get the impulse to flick the light switch because it temporarily makes the feeling go away. And not everyone even has compulsions. So yeah, the pattern is the same even when specific thoughts and/or compulsions differ. (My case is actually quite mild—that’s the thought routine, but I’m
    often able to interrupt it, so nowadays it doesn’t cause me too many
    problems.) Mara Wilson did a pretty good layman/humour piece on it, if you’re interested.

    But anyway, I’ve never heard someone actually claim to have the actual symptoms of OCD when they didn’t (or rather, I’d give them the benefit of the doubt). It’s always describing the idea “I’m a huge control freak” or “I do weird things” with the language “I’m so OCD”. And I think that stuff contributes more to people with it not being taken seriously than me describing my particular obsessions would. So while it was a really minor point in the show, I’m glad Jill mentioned it.

  • Shank

    Hi DreadfulKata. It seems we agree on a fair amount (well, by the standards of a Doctor Who thread anyway) but to address the concerns you do have:

    1) I think it’s reasonable to presume that the command ‘You should kill us all sight’ came with a parenthetical ‘Assuming you can’ tacked on at the end of it. I mean, what was Clara supposed to do? Run at them Kamikaze style and try punching them to death?

    2) Well…I’m not entirely convinced that’s a viable reading of what Jill wrote but fair enough. Agree to disagree?

    3) Maybe I explained badly. When I said “From the point of view of an outside observer, the line between OCD and just plain quirky isn’t always very clear” what I meant was that a lot of people think they know what OCD is, and think they have it (at least to an extent) when in fact they’re just a bit fussy/quirky. Maybe Moffat isn’t clear on exactly what OCD is either? He’d hardly be the only one. Either way, it seems silly to leap on this as a sign of insensitivity towards people with mental illness. I mean, why attribute to malice what can be just as easily explained by ignorance?

    4) You wrote: “so-the-hell-what that the intention was comedic? If I told a holocaust joke or hit someone round the head with a frying pan the intent would be comedic, it doesn’t negate the harm that’s done with the ‘joke’”

    You mean like ‘The Producers’? Or the 3 Stooges?

    Look, ultimately this is a matter of opinion and is thus a completely irresoluble argument. Either you believe the fact that the “incident” took place in a particularly fantastical episode of an already supremely unrealistic family sci-fi/fantasy show matters, or you don’t. Either you believe that the fact the kiss was delivered by a 1,000 year old alien with a notoriously poor grasp of social mores in gratitude toward a woman who had just saved his life is relevant, or it isn’t. And either you believe the fact that the kiss was rewarded with a resounding slap in the face clearly sent the message that such behaviour is unacceptable, or you don’t. My answer to all three is obviously Yes. If you differ, I’m not sure how I can change your mind. Again, I think we should agree to disagree.

    5) In fairness, I did say ‘most’, not ‘all’, and I also said ‘vaguely’ so it wasn’t like I was placing an inordinate amount of emphasis on it. Besides, I think I’m largely correct. It’s no secret that musical proficiency is commonly considered a desirable trait to possess. But for the sake of clarity, I’ll rephrase. How about if I said that most women find a guy vaguely fanciable if he’s good at DIY? This was recently voted the sexiest skill it’s possible for a man to possess, so I think I’m probably on safer ground with that one (http://tinyurl.com/c744gjp). The point is, whatever the skill, it’s not as impressive as owning a time machine and saving your life every five seconds. Besides, we’ve had companions who didn’t fancy the Doctor. What about Donna? Or Rory, for that matter? And personally, I don’t think it’s a co-incidence that Clara let slip the fact that she fancied the Doctor in his last episode. I doubt the infatuation (if, indeed, that isn’t too strong a word) will persist into the next season.

    I agree that sometimes debate between fans can be thoughtful and interesting, but I also think that, as eviltaco said, it can be downright toxic. I hasten to add that I don’t think this thread qualifies as toxic at all, but if you read the review threads on http://www.gallifreybase.com and other Who fansites the amount of pointless petulant spite on display is genuinely staggering to behold. So bad is it, in fact, that when Helen Raynor (writer of Daleks in Manhattan and The Sontaran Stratagem) visited the forums out of idle curiosity, she actually tried to quit the show. If I remember correctly, she likened the experience to being glassed in a pub. I also remember reading (thought his may be apocryphal) that Moffat explicitly warned Matt Smith to stay away from gallifreybase at all costs for exactly the same reason. When eviltaco said Who fandom might be the most toxic of any show on TV, I reckon he’s got a point. I certainly wouldn’t use this thread as evidence of that (and Jill’s review, while admittedly not to my tastes, is a perfectly thoughtful article), but on the whole Who fandom can be pretty bloody vile sometimes, maybe even most of the time.

  • Anonymous

    now that someone opened the door to mix up character + actress ;)
    I always wonder why I dislike Amy so much, and I think it had something to do with watching Confidential in which everything revolved around Karen… suitable to the character.
    I tried very hard to like Amy, but… I still can only tolerate her. it cannot be changed anyway ;)

  • Shank

    P.S. – If you liked that last joke, here’s another one:

    Q: How many Doctor Who fans does it take to change a light bulb?

    A: One million. One to hold the chair, one to change the bulb, and 999,998 to whinge about how light bulbs were so much better when they were kids :-)

  • Anonymous

    Your barking up the wrong tree.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna–whore_complex

    Moffat has a more contemporary variation where he over-romanticizes the “emotional”/”motherly” woman oppose to the “intellectual”/”chaste” woman. It is the same type phony “feminist” nonsense that disallows a woman to be a priest if she wants to because she plays the more “important” role of mother or nun. Watch “Masters of Sex” and pay attention to Virginia and Lillian and compare to the “Karen Gillian Acting Experiment” and Madame Kovarian. For women, sexual availability gets you ahead (but not too far ahead); while pure integrity amounts to a hill of beans.

  • Anonymous

    This. The Lodger was the best episode of the Smith years, by far. And that’s just Alien in a House. Meanwhile, the Christmas special bored me to tears. What makes a story interesting is the stakes to the characters. Here, I had no idea why the Doctor cared, or why I should care (apart from “well, he just always saves the universe!”). Nobody has a sense of that kind of scale. Unfortunately, “the entire universe is at stake!” will never be as compelling as “my friend is at stake!”

    Can’t help but think of Portal, when the companion cube goes into the incinerator. That moment was gut-wrenching, and IT WAS A BOX.

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera

    I see your point completely! That’s why Amy is super sexy, a model, and a writer, a woman, and smart enough to survive in places like the medical facility in “The Girl Who Waited.”

    And it’s why River Song is super flirty, crazy sexy, a University professor, and better at flying the Tardis than the Doctor.

    And it’s why Clara is flirty, gorgeous, a teacher, and smart enough to save the Doctor based either on thinking it out (Name of the Doctor) or on emotion (Day of the Doctor).

    And why Vastra and Jenny are brilliant enough to run the Paternoster Gang, while constructing a really sweet domestic life.

    Oh, and why in “A Good Man Goes to War” important characters like Lorna Bucket and River Song fit neatly into those same categories.

  • Kevin

    Ratings are just one measure of success. One could argue that Moffat’s tenure has coincided with an increased mainstream public interest in Doctor Who in the United States (whether he deserves credit for that and/or whether it is “a good thing” are matters of debate), and as such, by increasing the public image of the character and show, he has made it more successful. Personally, I do prefer the Moffat Era more … but then, Eleven is My Doctor (i.e., the one in place when I became a fan) and my exposure to the RTD’s Era came via Binge Watching via Netflix. In retrospect, there were a number of things I liked about the RTD’s Era (Rose, David Tennant most of the time, Capt Jack), but there were other things I didn’t (Donna or Martha for the first half of Season 3). Ultimately, it’s all subjective, and one person’s Loves are another person’s Hates. As they say, you can’t please everyone

  • shulkman

    I need clarification. These sites that claim Moffat is sexist against men / women / ??…

    They’re all jokes right? Satire? People can’t possible get upset about the Doctor being rescued by one sex or another, or claim misogyny based on a concept of emotion vs. intellect, right? If people are honestly getting upset , then screw it, no more companions. The doctor rolls solo, and only visits planets with asexual inhabitants. Problem solved. We can also make the Doctor asexual. Smooth him over like a Ken doll.

  • Anonymous

    thank you, after that I also read http://whatculture.com/tv/doctor-who-a-feminist-defence-of-steven-moffat.php (A Feminist Defense Of Steven Moffat)
    I already started to think I should be ashamed not to feel affronted by that kiss… ;)

  • Anonymous

    thanks for your insight, kristy, its very much appreciated. what we’re experiencing here in this thread is a fairly recent and fairly ridiculous trend wherein champions cant simply wait for causes to come to them.

  • Mark Matson

    Well, River died the very first time we met her. Time travel. There really is no reason she couldn’t just show up at any time.

    I do like the idea of her being the Papal Mainframe. Her mind exists, even after her body died.

  • Anonymous

    You seem to have annoyed someone with your opinions. LOL! We’ll have to agree to disagree about the Angels. I did love the Vashta Nerada, but I’d be afraid to see what new and ridiculous twist they’d be given if they were brought back. I thought they were good enough as is; I don’t think they’d need any new twists or reinventions in order to be effective again. No going the “an image of an Angel becomes an Angel” route, just have some dork who stole a couple books from the Library and oops, there’s a new colony out there somewhere. But it’s never that simple, so I’ll pass.

    The aliens I always wanted to see again were Jabe’s people from way back in The End of the World: the Trees of Cheem. Not enemies (or not at that time, anyway), but I just love the idea of tree people.

  • Anonymous

    Women- River Song might be given the lip service of being the better driver, but The Doctor owns the key.

    It is not like people here get jokes and satire, but when you go out of the way to make the same joke all the time- you’re a hack.

    It is about integrity,equality, and nuance. Real people like Zoe, Jamie, Donna, Tegan, and Ace that happen to be in a fantasy setting. You put too much stock on the ends (Yippee! She saved the day by pushing a button), rather means.

  • Cy

    I don’t recall Clara ever getting the perception filter initiation so it would have been easier to just tell her time lord science since she’s familiar with the Tardis. I know that’s not the Doctor’s normal way of explaining things but he was preoccupied with a very bad memory.

  • Jen Rock

    The way the scene was played out in the Christmas ep was far more creepy than in Smith’s first ep. Again, the line “I was hoping you’d notice.” Just, why?? And he’s stuck out like a sore thumb without ever being as weird as he was when he slapped her ass. I don’t think that’s an OK thing to show children, and me as an adult was appalled by it. A long shot from when he was cheek kissing every dude he met in The Lodger, which would have been way funnier to me, nude or not.

  • Kristy

    It is not all ‘checking stoves’ and ‘checking alarms’, his compulsion could be thoughts going on in his head, things you can’t see, thinking the same thoughts, saying a certain phrase over and over a certain amount of times, counting steps, counting stars, we don’t know and not everything is obvious. I have it bad at times and have not been able to stop the process (and been through therapy a lot – drugs help but I don’t like the side effects), yet no one else would know I had it because it involves stuff I do in my head. If I said “gosh yeah I do weird things all the time, I have OCD” then yeah I guess most people who did not know me would think I was just saying words because they can’t see the physical aspects of it. But that seems an odd way to judge something. ‘Oh she says she has cancer, but she doesn’t look sick, I find that so offensive’

    Please correct me if I am wrong, but that is the gist I am getting from your post. I mean using your expression “I am happy now I am sad I am so bipolar” okay so, you know for a FACT they aren’t? Because that might be an aspect of their life they aren’t ready to share but they make jokes about it to make themselves feel better about a serious condition.

  • shulkman

    Yeah, the image of an Angel thing did seem to be more complicated than it needed to be, but it put Amy in danger, a danger that she couldn’t just run away from . It required destroying the angel (The only time it’s actually happened on screen now that I think about it. The New York angels died by reset, except for at least one straggler… and I really wanted to see Eleven go all Fury of a Time Lord on that one. In a minisode or something. I wanted payback for the Ponds.

    As for the Vashta… they don’t have to be “re introduced” to the universe from The Library. There is a big bunch of them there, but it was never even hinted that it was all of them. Ten said they live in quiet places, woods, that sort of thing. What made the Library so horrifying is that there were so many of them concentrated there without their normal “scavenging” food sources.

  • locuas

    technically only half a season, but nevermind that. i am going to be honest, i always wanted a cyberman companion for the doctor.

  • locuas

    i always wanted a cyberman companion (yes, i know), so you could force us to care for him and i wouldn’t mind xD

  • shulkman

    I have to admit, I don’t think that the character of “Ace” would be ok in today’s Doctor Who. First of all, the outrage of a 1200 year old guy with a 16 year old girl? Jenna was cold the other day because she was standing in snow and there are some who feel that The Doctor just barely held himself back from 600 years of rape.

    I’d hate to see what they would say if the companion was a minor, with anger issues, a history of violent acts, and a hobby of making homemade explosive devices.

    Saving the day by (Actually, when was the last time a female pushed a button to save the day? I don’t think it’s as common as you think.) And no, the salvage ship doesn’t count because Clara had a chance to push the button and she blew it. The Doctor had to cross time to save their butts.

  • locuas

    she did return as a “ghost” in day of the doctor, so it is possible for her to appear outside the library, still, i don’t want to think too much about tasha as river because, well, river’s timeline already cause me headaches, if to that i have to add her as the leader of the group who had a rebel cell that kidnapped her as a kid, my head is going to explode.

  • shulkman

    Only because of the profound visual I had for a moment, and the fact that you realized how it sounded originally. :)

    “he was french kissing every dude’s cheeks in The Lodger”

  • Anonymous

    my kids laughed when that happened, i’ll punish them later.

  • Anonymous

    Oh, they don’t HAVE to be reintroduced, but they’d get kicked up a notch in every reappearance, becoming more and more ridiculous. Which sounds counterproductive, really. Villains (and characters in general) should grow and change as time progresses or they run the risk of stagnating. I just… haven’t really enjoyed some of the changes being made, maybe because I get a vibe that the changes are made for the sake of sensationalism rather than growth and development.

    Of course it’s just as likely that I’m impossible to please and will never be entirely happy with things that happen. I’ve become so bitter and cynical about television in general it can be really hard to shut off the Inner Critic and just enjoy something.

    That said, I would have liked a chance to see the development of the Daleks without their millenia-long war against the Doctor, just to see if they shifted onto different paths or turned out “better” than they’d been. Instead it got written off for the sake of convenience.

    I also think it would have made a neat twist if Handles had managed to fire off a message to the other Cybermen with a packet of what he learned during his 300+ years with the Doctor. Maybe he’d even manage to “corrupt” one or two of them into realizing that upgrading everyone isn’t always the answer.

  • Anonymous

    Right you are – it’s just been a long, dull half season…

  • Anonymous

    I agree – I really like her first episode (except the inane Pond divorce subplot). She’s suffered a lot from too much tell, not enough show syndrome. That and companion as plot device-itis.

  • ampersands

    Please, please listen: when you kiss someone without their consent, it is sexual assault. People aren’t looking for a reason to be offended; we are merely trying to tell you, the viewer who watches sexual assault without reacting as if it is anything out of the norm, that the norm is wrong, and by propping up that norm the makers of Doctor Who are reinforcing the idea that women don’t have as much bodily autonomy as men do.

    Narratively, there are many things to get upset about as well. But please don’t react dismissively when you hear someone talk about embedded misogyny. Moffat doesn’t really understand that film noir tropes are pretty sexist, and he perpetuates them without thought.

  • Anonymous

    Well put. I think my favorite episodes are The Girl Who Waited and Waters of Mars. The stakes are moderate – save the companion, save the doomed astronauts – and outcomes somewhat inevitable. But both have excellent small moments humanity at its best and worst, and both make you really care for the doomed protagonists. I’d add the Tenant episode on the crystal planet to the list, too (name brainfart).

  • shulkman

    Yes, and that raises all sorts of strange questions like how does a lizard woman in Victorian London contact a computer core in another galaxy, and 5000 years in the future? (I have considered the speed of light, but the numbers are already way off even at the edge of our galaxy so no matter where the library might be, a radio signal wouldn’t work.) But, since you brought up River’s timeline, there has been a one rule that was stuck to, even with all the jumping around in time. As the Doctor gets older, River gets younger, and conversely, as River got older and approached her day at The Library, the Doctor that she met should be “younger” or at least from earlier in his time stream. Now, he can cheat with the Tardis (and we see what can happen in the events of “Last Night”) but he can only cheat so much. He can keep picking her up for a date until the day she goes to the Library. From that moment on in his life, he can’t go see River again, not River with a pulse anyways. If he did, he’d be crossing his own time stream, and risk messing up hers. Not only could he screw up and possibly change her life, but her death is a fixed point in his life, and we’ve seen what those can do. But beyond that, she told him in the Library, “don’t you dare change a thing, not one minute,” it wasn’t just sentimentalism, it was protecting their timestreams and their lives. And because of the entaglement of their timestreams, there will never be a point he can go visit her living body again, without risking running into himself or altering her timeline away from that day in the Library.

  • shulkman

    I don’t react to it because it’s on TV, it’s fiction. Getting worked up over fiction is tiring. As I said, save it for the real injustices in the world. We don’t get regenerations. One attempt and we’re done, and sometimes those attempts are shorter than the average. But, in the real world, if I see a woman in distress, I’ll be on him like white on rice. I’ll give him hell until I’m no longer able to move. I’d give her a damn good head start on whatever is left of him. :)

  • Chiara

    I think it will be a plot point at the very least: that one sentence is used to close the episode, in a very “relevant” moment, it would be kind of awkward (at least to me) if it’s just banter.

    On one side, I would like to see a completely new Doctor (a more grown up, serious one fits Capaldi more, I think), but I am kind of scared of a complete reset that changes and erases everything again.

  • M Lynn Walker

    The reviewer might have liked it more if she had watched it more closely. Tasha was flirting madly with the Doctor from the instant they were eye to eye. Also, we know exactly how many regenerations he now has, since the line was explicit about it being a whole “new cycle of regenerations”.

  • M Lynn Walker

    Plus the fact that Moffat created both Amy Pond and River Song certainly should do away with all this “sexist” chat. But it doesn’t. People who thought the Jenny kiss was out of line — didn’t you like the slap he got for it? That was kind of the point of the incident.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry, what? The Doctor is a fictional character. “I’m OCD [for doing proper research]” is not a nuanced portrayal of mental illness, it’s a shitty throwaway line, and Moffat did the exact same thing in Sherlock (“high-functioning sociopath”, natch). If some enterprising fanfic writer wants to write the Doctor as having OCD, then whatever. But that is not what Moffat is doing. So I’m perfectly happy criticizing the writing choice, it’s not like it would hurt the Doctor’s feelings.

    I mean using your expression “I am happy now I am sad I am so bipolar” okay so, you know for a FACT they aren’t?

    I have no idea what this means. I specifically said that if someone told me they had a condition, I would assume they were telling the truth. But if they’re referring to their reaction to a Supernatural episode (this happened), or their mom getting mad at them for staying out late (ditto), then no. That’s not cool. Doubly so if they are writing a character and describe them as bipolar for completely normal behaviour.

  • shulkman

    It’s difficult to bring it up because some feel so passionately about it. Me personally, I’m not going to get offended by actions in fiction land. As far as exposing kids to behavior (which has been brought up)… If your kid’s behavior can be swayed by Doctor Who, then that’s not really a problem with the show… 99.9% of kids know the difference between fantasy and reality. I’ve heard/seen stories about behavior being set by video games or movies or AC/DC or (insert thing here)… but never in my life did I listen to a song or watch a movie or play a video game and thought, gee, “I think I’ll go strangle a hooker because the guy in the movie did it and it was totally ok.” But, bringing that up, repercussions for his actions keeps the Doctor honest. Yeah, he came out of the cabinet, able to move for the first time in weeks, quite happy, and he struck a Times Square pose with Jenny, who quickly and decisively let him know that his behavior had not been appreciated by giving him a hefty whack. The only thing missing was a “No! Bad Doctor!” And actually I think it is a decent message to send…. The Doctor is not above reproach, even in the eyes of his closest friends.

  • Goody Weaver

    I think ANY of the old Doctors could have done that – it’s not like we see every moment on screen for any of them.

  • Goody Weaver

    Hoping Capaldi can bring the Doctor back around to the old-style real ALIEN genius being from the original series…but if they don’t unload the morons who keep writing garbage like this finale, I doubt it. Watched this with my husband and 8 year old son tonight. Husband fell asleep, and the minute it was over, the 8 year old asked me to put on a DVD of an old Tom Baker episode. And at that point, it struck me – this should have been at least a 4-part episode, not every story line from Matt Smith’s entire run crammed into an hour. Are we fans really too stupid and so lacking attention now that we can’t take a multi-part episode?

  • http://www.tumblr.com/tumblelog/lastbutnotleast Anonymous

    If they’re young at the time of their regeneration, not so much.

  • Jen Rock

    lol My brain immediately went “That’s called ‘bisou bisou’ in French… kissing… French kissing.”
    Then I realized what I had actually written…

  • Brian D. Smith

    The Grinch has a new name…and her name is Jill.

  • Brian D. Smith

    Lets not forget that Matt essentially forced Moffatt into a box – not re-upping for another year – the man had to shoe-horn in a finale. My guess is that he told Capaldi, “Give me a guarantee of 2 yrs, and it’s yours”.

  • Kristy

    I honestly didn’t understand your post, you did clarify it above, however, I think there were statements in there that were not needed. I think you thought I was trying to be rude to you, and that was not my intent. I could be wrong though….

    Yes he is a fictional character. So, Martha Jones was a fictional doctor – what was her field of study? Do we know? Maybe she diagnosed him. Can’t anyone assume that without seeing it on screen? Can’t we use our brains to fill in the blanks?

    But again 100 percent of people with OCD know they have it. Maybe he does have it, said it, but is not using to explain his behavior at that moment. He is ‘clever’ right? He can be self aware can’t he? I was aware I had ocd enough to seek treatment, and all people with OCD know they have it, (if not then it is labeled as OCPD) but don’t know exactly when and where and how much it effects them. Possibly he used it in the wrong context to try to be more human. Maybe, like I read somewhere else on this page, that Matt Smith’s nephew has OCD and is struggling with it and he asked “hey can I throw this line in here to make my nephew feel better since it is my last show” After all if the Doctor can have ocd, then he isn’t perfect (and ocd derives from perfectionism) What you call a throw away line could have had something behind the scenes you don’t know about – actors do that all the time. You blame Moffat, maybe it wasn’t his idea – maybe another writer, maybe Matt Smith. We don’t know, there are lot of assumptions being made.

    As for people reacting to a Supernatural episode, or staying out late (by saying they are OCD – I don’t understand this example, I think you are missing a sentence or two)? That comes with maturity (assumption made since you said their mom got made at them)…it’s been 20+ years since I lived with my mom, so to me, that is typical stuff that will drop out of the picture as people mature. I don’t believe the intent is harmful….do you really do believe they are being mean and harmful to people with said mental disorder? I don’t think so. It is something they learn with time. I could hold a lot against my 20-25 year old nieces and nephews for what
    they say….but I don’t because I know with time at least 80 percent of what they think will change.

    They are using to not be responsible for their actions – and that is worse than what they actually said. If you want to call them on it, call them on why they are using it, not what they are saying.

    Example – went out to eat recently, and waiter got something on the menu wrong (my child has food allergies so I would rather not have to use an EPIpen) When I asked him about it he said “oops, (in a funny voice) I must have dyslexia” I was a little upset, after all, his flippant joke that 1)made fun of people with dyslexia and b) he was using as an excuse that could have really hurt my daughter. He obviously was taking no responsibility for himself. I laid into him about making a joke about a disability to excuse his behavior that could have sent my daughter to the ER. And making fun of dyslexic people.

    Turns out he did have dyslexia, and I felt terrible because my judgement hurt his feelings (my superiority actually, that I know the situation better than him)…I spoke with the owner a long time afterwards about it.

    Maybe it wasn’t to correct way for him to handle it, but that was how he coped and as he got older I would assume that will change. I still feel terrible about it.

    My point is, that you can judge, and no one can stop you from thinking what you think, but there a lot of times your assumptions are wrong. That is life and happens to everyone.

  • Anonymous

    I can see that, but… even with a template to build off of, you still have to actually, physically make a new body. DNA is just instructions.

    But, yeah, a Watcher explanation would have been cool. Especially because the Watcher never made a jot of sense to me anyway, so that could have finally been explained.

  • Rijacki

    According to some reports, Matt had signed on for a specific amount of time at the start and had said, then, that’s all he was going to do before moving on to the rest of his career. If Moffatt didn’t pay attention to that, it wasn’t Matt forcing anything, it was just Moffatt using wishful thinking and imagining Matt going on forever. Matt has had a good run and a good time span. It’s not Matt’s first year nor even his second. The only Doctor with a herculean time span as the Doctor was Tom Baker and perhaps, in the broader scope, that was a bit overlong. It did make transitioning to a new Doctor more difficult at that time (though with other circumstantial issues, too, of course).

  • Rijacki

    In the days of th multi-part serials, the show was 30 mins. Now the show is 1hour or more for a special. Six 30 min eps in a serial FAR out weighs a 2-parter hour-long and gives more opportunity for pacing and cliff-hangers to keep you suspensfully waiting for the next week. But, in current format of the show, the Christmas special is a highlight and has to occur entirely on Christmas. I’m sure that’s more for the advertisers and their dollars than for anything related to story. In fact, watching in Canada on Space, it felt almost as if it was a multi-part serial, but the eps were shorter and it wasn’t a week wait between just far too many adverts.

    A lot of the tie-ups could have happened earlier in the season (Moffatt has known for a while Matt was leaving, a lot longer than the fans have known, he did have Matt’s original contract, so it was not a great surprise) in other shows. They didn’t have to all happen at once. There was also no reason -everything- needed to be tied up and re-visited.

  • Goody Weaver

    Totally agree – they should have been addressing the various storylines all season and bringing them together. Instead we get this mishmosh of “everything into the kettle” – and bringing back literally every major alien the Doctor has ever faced. Just ridiculous. Like having the weeping angels appear for a few minutes and then disappear for the episode – when in the past they were so formidable, they required an entire episode all their own. Just silly.

  • Goody Weaver

    Totally agree – they should have been addressing the various storylines all season and bringing them together. Instead we get this mishmosh of “everything into the kettle” – and bringing back literally every major alien the Doctor has ever faced. Just ridiculous. Like having the weeping angels appear for a few minutes and then disappear for the episode – when in the past they were so formidable, they required an entire episode all their own. Just silly.

  • Anonymous

    My point is, you are using your experience with real life and placing your assumptions on a tv show.

    Yes. Yes I am.

  • Kim Williams

    So perfectly said.

  • Kevin Bernard

    I don’t see what’s so bad about the Doctor forcefully kissing people. It was established long ago that the eleventh Doctor doesn’t quite get society’s approach to kissing. He kissed as a greeting in “The Lodger”, and as a way of displaying appreciation in “Dinosaurs on a Spaceship” (kissing a straight guy, which seems no different to me than kissing a lesbian woman), “The Crimson Horror”, and now “The Time of the Doctor”.

  • Kevin Bernard

    It’s “Let’s Kill Hitler”, and she did have to use them all. He just told her not to, even at the cost of his own death.

  • Kevin Bernard

    Her sacrifice was to bring him life, not to give him further regenerations.

  • Kevin Bernard

    I actually rather like what they’ve done with the Daleks as of late. The “Dalek puppets” are a genuinely creepy idea and have a lot of story potential.

    The Cybermen, on the other hand, have gotten pretty pitiful, even with Gaiman’s pen behind them.

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera

    Thank you. It’s all about the context. A random man in the street comes up and kisses you? Sexual assault. The Doctor kisses his friend to show affection? Goofing around and going a bit far.

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera

    Guys, the point of the naked thing was that it was funny.
    That’s it.
    A Joke.
    And Moffat getting to cackle and sneak implied R-rated stuff in that went totally over the kids’ heads.

  • Guest

    Well, Tasha Lem and Jenny were both friends of his…

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera

    Well, he didn’t say he was “hoping” she’d notice–he said she might notice.
    Why? Because the Doctor is a 1200 alien who has spent time of millions of worlds in millions of cultures and does not get our approach to nudity. Hence his failure to realize that meeting Clara’s family while in the nude and suggesting Twister made him look like a lunatic.
    So, it’s FUNNY because the “clueless Doctor” meets “normal Clara” and hilarity ensues with her discomfort and his bafflement.

  • Anonymous

    I had the nagging sense I’d seen something similar to that before and now that you mention Gaiman, maybe that’s what I was thinking of: we went through something like this with the Cybermen. They still looked human, but the Cybermen had hijacked them. Except the people inside could still think and feel as themselves, if only they’d fight hard enough. And there was a lesser echo of that with Rory the Auton, who had to fight off his programming to be “himself.” Different circumstances and results each time, of course, and maybe it’s different enough not to matter to 99% of fandom, but it makes me tired. Either way, the Dalek thing might have been an interesting twist if they’d done anything with it (and if something similar hadn’t happened) but it felt too much like overkill. One more over-the-top element in an ep chock full of them. At the very least this should have been its own episode, precisely so we could see the effects, not only on the people, but the Daleks.

  • Kevin Bernard

    I enjoyed it in “Asylum of the Daleks”, as it was surprising and somewhat scary. The sleeper agent style of it is very intriguing, as is the re-animation of the dead. This differs from the Cybermen who just sort of hack people with earbuds until the Doctor comes along and reverses it. I felt the puppet concept wasn’t as exciting in “The Time of the Doctor” (though I loved the episode), but didn’t have any issues with that because the story was about the Doctor, not the Daleks.

  • Kevin Bernard

    Also, the Master getting run into the ground happened rather early in the Classic series. I’m not sure how familiar you are with the Classic episodes, but upon introduction, he appeared in five consecutive, unrelated stories. He then appeared in several more soon afterwards, and would have continued to appear had the actor, Roger Delgado, not died. In later eras, other actors portrayed other incarnations of him, with many more appearances. So there’s no need to imagine what would happen “if they did that with the Master”; it has already been done.

  • Santa Who

    Ok… here is the post I meant to comment on… (reposting)

    I really wonder why more people are not thinking that Tasha Lem is River? I don’t know about everyone else, but I felt that Moffet was foreshadowing that possible connection with a sledgehammer. Tasha did everything but say ‘hello sweety’ or say ‘what sort of time do you call this?’.

    I don’t think this is the last we’ll see of the Papal Mainframe either.

  • shulkman

    Well, the thing is that while there are points supporting the idea, there are also points that say otherwise. Remember Tasha Lem asking him “Oh, is that a new body?” Why would River say that? River knows that body quite well. Flying the Tardis points to River, but “flying the Doctor, I never quite mastered”, points away from River. I don’t know, I’m sure we’ll just have to wait and see. I’m not a genius in the classic episodes, and Moffat recently said, very clearly, that Romana and The Rani were not Tasha Lem, but they would make more sense than River, as they haven’t seen the Doctor in his 11th body, but had spent time with him in the past, and could fly the Tardis. So, maybe Moffat is lying in order to keep the surprise intact. (He’s done it before with Baker and Paul McCann. Critics get pissed at him for lying, but he did it to keep the surprise under wraps… no one likes spoilers.) And yeah, the “hints” were anything but subtle, and that actually points away from River. It’s like Moffat wants everyone to think “River” in order to spring a bigger surprise on us.

    Oh, and ignore my comment about the Papal Mainframe. I goofed on that. I thought the Doctor said it was a giant flying computer, but no, the Doctor said it was is “a great big flying church”. My tired brain confused the two. While the word “mainframe” does make you think computer, we were not shown any sign that the ship is anything but a ship.

  • Santa Who

    “flying the Doctor, I never quite mastered”, You really think that is something that River wouldn’t say?

    When Moffet foreshadows like this I’ve learned I should go with my first impulse. (That could be a mistake. It’s bit too obvious.)

  • Christian Farmer

    So you’re saying you want an episode to be simple and straight forward, to the point where you understand every aspect of it the first time you watch it, therefore having no need to rewatch it and see what small little details you missed?

  • Christian Farmer

    In this case, the time lords gave him enough extra energy to use it as a weapon. It wasn’t the Doctor got from within himself, it was something granted to him.

  • radiantbaby

    Or Cassandra-as-Rose or Reinette kissing the Tenth Doctor. No one seems to mind those either.

  • radiantbaby

    Nah, it wasn’t that she was Most Important necessarily, I think it was just meant to be a nice bookend to the beginning and end of Eleven’s run. (I mean, Fivey called out Adric’s when he was regenerating, but that doesn’t make him his favorite companion).

  • radiantbaby

    AMEN.

  • Jason sage

    “And now it’s time for one last bow,
    like all your other selves
    11′s hour is over now
    the clock is striking 12′s”

    Now before i post i will say i am a newer Who fan. I started watching when Matt starting as the Doctor, though that is not to say that he is the only Doctor i have seen. Yet i am willing to say this is one of those episodes that i will chalk up as one of the best under Matt Smith’s tenure. The writting and pace of this episode has some troubles, obviously, but i walked away watching it three times in a row with a tear in my eye because of the strong performances given within.

    I liked how many of those “We’ll tell you later” momments finally were resolved (But hated how the Daleks were defeated). But most of all i felt like that final scene was needed. It was sad and as a new fan i felt like that end was the best way to send off Matt and welcome in Capaldi.

  • docryan8404@gmail.com

    When Patrick Troughton left he left because he did not want to be typecast, and today it is known as the “Troughton effect”. He later told Colin Baker, I believe, that he should only do the show for about 3 seasons. Sean Connery did the same for Bond.

  • http://www.takuhii.co.cc/ button_man

    Can we stop calling him 11? where does the War Doctor come into it, what about the Meta-Crisis doctor when Tennant choose to regenerate INTO HIMSELF!!! :s

    He is blatantly 13, the clock doesn’t hiccup because “War Doctor” is time locked, it’ still happened, it’s still -1 for the regeneration count.

    I detest Moffat’s writing on a whole, and this episode didn’t disappoint either, questions where answered clumsily and all so matter-of-fact. He doesn’t explain why he’s run out of regenerations at only 11, he doesn’t explain a lot of things, it’s just confusing…

    If he sits and dies of old age on Christmas (Trenzalore?}, how does he come back to curate the museum as Tom Baker? There’s loads of other plot holes to large to mention :/

  • Anonymous

    Ah, but there are folks out there (myself included) who find lots of things wrong with those two characters. Or at least, with their major storylines.

  • http://coffeeandfingernails.com Coffeeandfingernails

    Is “looked like a 55 year old guy” supposed to be a negative? Capaldi is a talented and charismatic actor able to deliver a line in a way that makes me want to know more about the character he’s playing–much like Matt Smith, whose talents allowed me to power through several atrocious Moffat scripts over the past couple of years. It’s precisely that ability to pack so much into each moment that made Smith believable as a 1000 year old world-weary adventurer. Any actor unable to grab you in the first 10 seconds should probably be doing something else.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    The problem is that it basically functioned as a way for the Doctor to make Clara uncomfortable. He is naked in front of her, then in front of her family. Then he makes HER strip naked and gives her holo-clothes, only to reveal AFTER that they have no effect on the Church, grossly violating her personal rights.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    Except he’s spent most of his time with humans. He’s spent at least hundreds of his years with humans and understands many important parts of our culture, such as classic fiction and racism. There’s no way he could not know that he was being inappropriate.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    Don’t forget his later tendencies to do creepy stuff that would be counted as sexual harassment if he were human, one of the biggest disappointments I had with his Doctor (my favorite Doctor until the show started getting bland and weird in S7).

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    I felt that the Angels were great in The Angels Take Manhattan, but shoehorning them in just for the hell of it was stupid. In addition, there are better ways to bring in a bunch of the Doctor’s enemies than “they all come to see something that’s sending a signal everywhere”. We already did that in the S5 finale, remember? Not to mention that they weren’t even particularly important to the plot.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    The kissing as a greeting was on the cheek, something that is considered socially normal in many places. “Dinosars on a Spaceship” depends on whether the Doctor and Rory had the sort of relationship whether they could randomly do that sort of silly thing; I can’t tell, so I’m on the fence. The Crimson Horror, on the other hand, was ridiculous. He kissed a lesbian woman who was in a relationship (with a nonhuman, no less!) with the intent to use it as an attack, then didn’t even apologize. The Time of the Doctor is even worse: he is basically told “No, that isn’t okay, don’t do that.” And he replies with “Ask nicely.” Any sort of “forceful kissing” is a gross violation of the victim’s person, and if it happened in real life, it would be considered harassment.

  • http://tyrannyofthepetticoat.wordpress.com/ Vera

    In case you haven’t noticed, the Doctor is a bit clueless.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    Some people did complain (whovianfeminism, for example). I think the kiss with Rory was probably just as bad (unless Rory has told the Doctor he’s okay with the Doctor doing random stuff like that). The reason the female kisses were more focused upon is probably because they perpetuate objectification of women, which is more common in media than objectification of men.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    He understands the really important conventions, however. In addition, he said “I thought you might notice”, which implies (although doesn’t outright state) that he knew Clara would find it weird. In addition, remember Metacrisis being naked in front of Donna? He immediately understood why it made her uncomfortable and got dressed. Since Metacrisis was basically identical to the actual Doctor, this means that he knew it as well.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    One thing that really bothered me about was the Rose parallel, intentional or not. They got sent home by the Doctor during a particularly dangerous adventure after not knowing him for more than a season (half a season, in Clara’s case). Even their apartments looked similar. However, Rose actually did something: she broke into the TARDIS (doesn’t make sense that she could, but no important to my point) and looked into the Time Vortex, becoming Bad Wolf and saving the day. Meanwhile, Clara just sat around being sad until she got brought back by someone else, not to help the Doctor, but to provide emotional support. Finally, she saved the day by telling the Time Lords that the Doctor is awesome. A bit of a contrast in terms of agency.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    It’s assault if it wasn’t consensual, and it clearly wasn’t. After, she specifically told him he should have asked her. And what laws they were abiding by isn’t the issue, the morality of it is.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    Flirting doesn’t give him the right to kiss her: afterward, she specifically told him that he should have asked permission first.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    Exactly. It isn’t about the scale, it’s about how much you care about it. Admittedly, the whole “the universe will be destroyed” thing can be kinda thrilling if you play it right, but only if it’s in addition to characters we have a reason to empathize with.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    I haven’t seen any pitchfork-waving, and I’ve been on Tumblr, for God’s sake. The most I’ve seen is people getting really aggressive about valid complaints.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    “Either you believe the fact that the “incident” took place in a particularly fantastical episode of an already supremely unrealistic family sci-fi/fantasy show matters, or you don’t.”

    The problem with this is that the Doctor is more and more used as a character for the fans to identify with, and as a role model. The type of show doesn’t matter, and I agree that it’s unlikely that people will see something in DW and conciously think “that’s okay to do, then.” However, it sends the message that sexual harassment is okay in some contexts, which it’s not.

    “Either you believe that the fact the kiss was delivered by a 1,000 year old alien with a notoriously poor grasp of social mores in gratitude toward a woman who had just saved his life is relevant, or it isn’t.”

    Social mores are not the issue. The issue is that it’s a violation of her person. We’ve seen violations of privacy before: Nine spying on Rose. However, Jack caught him at it and told him he was being a creepy weirdo.

    “And either you believe the fact that the kiss was rewarded with a resounding slap in the face clearly sent the message that such behaviour is unacceptable, or you don’t.”

    It would be if the Doctor actually took it seriously, but he doesn’t. The fact that Jenny doesn’t seem to care afterward implies that it isn’t a big deal.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    “Which one was stronger?” Amy fulfills the trope known as StrongWomanTM: she is strong physically, but not in terms of character. She gets little development, hasn’t got much agency, and is completely dependent on the men in her life. A strong character meaning a good character with emotional development is not the same thing as a character who is physically aggressive.

    You mentioned Jenny “standing up and kicking the Doctor’s butt”. That would be good if the kiss were used as an example of the Doctor being creepy like Nine’s Rose-stalking that was called out by Jack. However, it was included for comedic purposes, not for that reason.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    There’s a point where something is offensive. For instance, you probably wouldn’t say that “some people” might find the statement “black people are stupid” offensive. It simply is. The same is true for the OCD joke. I have OCD, and I’m frustrated by people trivializing my suffering by using it the way the Doctor did, in a jokey context.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    1. Would you be okay with the Doctor saying that he was developmentally disabled (say, autistic) after not thinking of something obvious? It’s pretty much the same.

    2. The Doctor slapping Clara’s butt, him inviting her into the TARDIS while naked despite knowing how uncomfortable in makes humans (such as when Donna first met the Metacrisis and he immediately realized that his nakedness made her uncomfortable), him saying he was projecting a holo onto her without telling her that she was naked to the Church, and him kissing someone without her consent, then refusing to heed her complaints. Just off the top of my head.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    The difference is that sexual harassment isn’t a matter of “social mores”, as some people call it. He’s 1200 years old and should be well aware that kissing someone without permission violates their person. The social stuff is different, a matter of conventions. Sexual harassment is not convention.

  • Anonymous

    Ooooer, an old classic: disagreement in the form of an ad hominem attack. But if that’s what it takes for you to renew your “spiky internet personality” card, so be it!

  • Anonymous

    He’s dead.

  • Kristy

    He didn’t say OCD was stupid. He said “I have OCD”. There are 2 arguments I can see with the example you provided

    1) Your example is an opinion, his statement could possibly be a fact (Martha Jones was a dr, maybe she said he had it? the very definition of OCD is that people are aware they have it, if not it is OCPD, so he is stating a fact in his mind, you do not need a dr to diagnose you as having OCD, those with OCD know it before they seek treatment) Again Doctor knows he is clever, but no he can’t decide for himself if he has OCD? How do people figure out they have OCD, because a doctor tells them? NO because they realize their obsessions and conclusions are getting in the way of daily life, and only the person who HAS it can judge the severity of that. Then they seek treatment for themselves, maybe he has not done that yet.

    2) The intent of your example – did they say it to be mean? Well then yes it offensive. Did they say to be hurtful? then yes offensive. Did they say it out of ignorance – well then they need to be taught the truth, and I can’t yell “offensive” to someone who doesn’t know any better (think of a child, do we tell kids what they did was offensive and then can’t believe they said it? no we teach them what it right thing to say) Was saying “I have OCD” meant to mean or hurtful? It doesn’t seem like it to me. Again everyone is saying it is a throwaway alone because the Doctor doesn’t have OCD, because well…why can’t he? That is what I don’t get. You can believe he is an alien who time travels with 2 hearts, but explicitly does NOT have and will never have ocd.

    Anyway I don’t find it offensive because I saw it as a statement of fact. I have moderate and at times severe OCD. I don’t care it people try to trivialize it because my deal and my working on it is in no way effected by what someone else things, does or says. And I certainly don’t want nor need anyone speaking for me, I am capable and have the intelligence to do it myself thank you very much. If he said “I have OCD and it is stupid” then we would be talking. But there is an arguement of intent, and since we can’t read the writers minds, then we have no clue what the intent was

    If someone emails or calls Matt Smith and all the writers on the show and asks them why they put the line in there and they replied “eh, we thought it would be funny” Then I will concede the argument that it was meant to trivialize a disorder

  • Penny Marie Sautereau

    You seem to be struggling with the definition of “Ad hominem attack”.To have made an ad-hominem attack against you, I’d have had to say direct personal insults attacking your character, such as calling you an idiot with several colourful adjectives attached. All I said was no one cares.

    On the other hand, you suggesting I’m trying to complete a “spikey Internet Personality bingo card” IS in fact an ad hominen attack. YOU jumped on me in attack mode the moment I posted my first comment. You started this imbecilic debate. YOU went into attack mode, being condescending and rude from your first unprovoked reply, and still doing so with this last clueless condescending reoply. All I did was be a woman posting my reaction to the episode. YOU were the aggressor. And THAT’S why I said no one cares what you think. This is The Mary Sue, we tend to generally NOT care what condescending rude dismissive men think of us around here.

    Done with you now.

  • Eve

    I watched it late and after having just rewatched “The Parting of the Ways” and “The Christmas Invasion”, I found a lot of this episode disappointing. There are so many things that don’t make sense. How did he save Christmas with his regeneration power and still have enough power to regenerate? Did he really save Christmas? He blew up the Daleks, but what about the Angels and Cybermen on the ground? What about the Slitheen (thought that was a family name and they were wiped out; why is it being used like it’s the name of their race?) and all of those other ships? Why was the Silence helping him? Why did Capaldi give Capaldeyes to Clara? Has he forgotten her? Amnesia is not cool, Dr. Who, not ever. Why didn’t the Time Lords come through instead of just sending some power? Why did they waste hundreds of years if all Clara needed to do was say “please.?

  • Alex Young

    um, hundreds? the gallifreyan war council leader specifically stated “all thirteen”. we know there’s more, however, because of tom baker’s cameo (not sure how matt smith’s doctor forgot that bit).
    also, in the very early series, during hartnell’s time it was stated/hinted (im not sure which) that he was not in fact the first doctor. so i almost feel like arguing over numbering is silly because it could change again.

  • Shank

    Yes, the kiss was a violation of her person. And when Moe hits Curly with a frying pan, that’s grievous bodily harm. When Homer Simpson strangles Bart, that’s child abuse. Del Boy Trotter is common thief and a confidence trickster who preys on the weaker and more credulous members of his own community, and what is Maurice Moss of the I.T. Crowd if not a mocking, tasteless caricature of people suffering from autistic spectrum disorder?

    Now, I’m sure you agree that GBH, child abuse, thievery and mental illness aren’t laughing matters. But doubtless, if I were to try defending any of the above propositions in public I’d simply be accused of missing the point (and of being horribly po-faced to boot). But really (and I ask in all seriousness), what’s the difference? It can’t be that the above shows are cartoons or sitcoms because, in your own words, “The type of show doesn’t matter.” And it can’t be that people identify with the Doctor and not characters like Homer Simpson and Del Trotter, because success of those shows is almost entirely predicated on the popularity of those characters. So what’s the difference?

    With all due respect, I sincerely believe that there is no difference. You were offended, and that’s that. I wasn’t, and that’s that too. Trying to persuade someone they’re wrong to be offended (or to not be offended) is like trying to persuade someone they’re wrong to dislike a movie. It’s simply impossible. Offence is an emotional reaction, based on criteria unique to the individual. And there’s no such thing as an objectively offensive work of art.

    Personally, I think several elements of the scene clearly ameliorated the obvious inappropriateness of the Doctor’s actions. For instance, the fact that Jenny is about a thousand times tougher than the Doctor and could probably snap him like a twig without breaking a sweat, to me, mitigates the offensiveness of the kiss. If you disagree, how on earth could I possibly answer you? You disagree, and that’s all there is to it. That’s the essence of subjective judgements, and that’s why arguing about it is futile.

    So, agree to disagree? With all due respect, it’s either that, or we keep talking past eachother forever.

  • Anonymous

    Except that we know that wasn’t true, because the little boy Barnable wasn’t the same as the grown up boy who came later. It was made pretty clear that time passed….

  • Anonymous

    Actually, if it doesn’t interfere with your life , it’s not classified as OCD. It’s one of the main diagnostic criteria for the disorder in the DSM.

    https://intermountainhealthcare.org/ext/Dcmnt?ncid=520221311

  • Kristy

    yes, I figure most people who know they have it know because it interfered with their life, right? Or am i misunderstanding it? That would make sense because you self diagnose and seek help. The OP is kind of alluding that the Doctor or anyone can’t know because they need to be diagnosed by a doctor first, that someone needed to tell him he had OCD before he can say himself has it. That is not what happens, people with OCD know LONG before they actually seek help:

    “At some point during the course of the disorder, the person has recognized that the obsessions or compulsions are excessive
    or unreasonable.”

    Gauging how much it intereferes is a personal issue – “or significantly interfere with the person’s normal routine, ” If I think it bothers me all day because of my obsessive thoughts and my compulsions are mental and not a physical issue that others can see and depresses me to the point I want to kill myself regardless of what I do for my compulsions, then it is classified as OCD

    And if you have it and don’t believe it interferes with your life but others do, it is OCPD.

    Believe me, a husband, child and myself have it, one is on medication. I am completely familiar with OCD for over 20 years. Severe and mild, comes and goes, but it is always there.

    If you are saying that they don’t have it because it doesn’t interfere with their life, then you misunderstood what I was trying to say. OCD is NOT the same during the course of your life, and while it doesn’t bother you for 5 years, then it may be severe for 5 years, then it will wane. Sometimes it does interfere and sometimes it doesn’t but once you have OCD, you have it, even if it is not severe for a few years.

  • shulkman

    The people may have aged and had kids, new generations, etc. but something held them all there, in that village around the clocktower, (a village that sustained damage, yet never seemed to be rebuilt) and something kept their “technological advancement” stalled to a point of wood and knives. That tells me that there’s a hell of a powerful force wrapping it’s hands around that village. Tasha Lem said it was a human settlement. Knowing what we do of humans, do you think that 600 years could go by without someone inventing a transistor? Or a weapon to defend themselves with? They were under attack after all. To me, it says there’s more than just the churches shield at play there.

  • Anonymous

    There’s a difference though between there being something keeping the town from technological advancement, and the day *resetting* A la groundhog day. That’s the way you originally explained it, and I was pointing out the hole in your explanation.

  • http://welcometohereafter.com/ Bry Kotyk

    “A weeping angel touched her leg. THAT IS WHAT GOT RID OF AMY AND RORY. HOW DOES THAT NOT EFFECT CLARA?!?!?!?”

    A Weeping Angel grabbed River’s wrist in the same episode that Amy and Rory were sent back in time. Not every touch means time displacement – they have to specifically choose to do that.

    “they rewrote history so he never dies on Trenzalore. So….Clara never goes into The Doctor’s Timestream.”

    Possibly, but not necessarily. Who’s to say another, final visit to Trenzalore isn’t in the Doctor’s future? And if not, it’s not the first time we’ve seen a temporal paradox in this show.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    1. There’s no indication that he actually has OCD, and the way it’s used (“Because I’m OCD”) makes it sound like a description of a personality trait, rather than a mental illness.

    2. I highly doubt Moffat meant it to be hurtful to anyone. But you know what? Intent doesn’t matter here. He could have had the best intentions in the world when writing that line, and it still makes OCD seem trivial. I’m not trying to say that Moffat deliberately did anything wrong, but it’s possible to be inappropriate without intending to do so.

    3. “I have…OCD and I don’t care if people try to trivialize it.” Well jolly good for you, but just because it doesn’t offend YOU doesn’t mean it won’t offend anyone else, and it doesn’t change the fact that it makes a joke out of a serious illness.

    “And I certainly don’t want nor need anyone speaking for me, I am capable and have the intelligence to do it myself thank you very much.” I’m not speaking for YOU. I’m speaking for myself, and for those who DO care when their suffering is trivialized.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    The difference is that, while people do identify with those other characters you mentioned, they aren’t supposed to be role models; to the contrary, the point of Homer, for instance, is that he’s a jerk. When he does something like that, it’s obviously bad. The Doctor, on the other hand, is supposed to be a role model, and we all, to some extent, internalize the idea that what our role models do is good.

    But the bigger problem here is that it was presented as funny, and why. When Homer does bad stuff, it’s funny because it’s ironic: The Simpsons is a parody of real life, and the character’s actions reflect that.

    Doctor Who, however, is not a parody, and the kiss is presented as being funny because Jenny gets pissed off after being sexually assaulted. Now, if Homer did this, I wouldn’t have a problem with it, because we KNOW he’s a jerk, and we expect him to act like a jerk. But the Doctor is supposed to (usually) do good stuff, and when he does bad stuff, presenting it as amusing sends the message that it isn’t a big deal.

  • Kristy

    I give people the benefit of the doubt that they aren’t trying to be hurtful or be mean spirited. I even will try to do it with your post, however, I do find it got a little mean spirited or aggressive and I don’t find that
    necessary. I always find direct quoting, especially in comment sections, to be argumentative. I don’t know if I deserve that, I never leaned that way towards my posts, because I don’t feel argumentative or hostile with anyone. I find this to be an interesting discussion and I am learning a lot from people, as long as it remains a discussion and doesn’t turn into an argument over whose opinion is correct.

    People make jokes out of serious illnesses all the time. I see humor in my issue. I don’t suffer, I deal. Sadly I FEEL (making sure you understand this is my opinion) this is why we have no good comedians anymore “omg, you can’t joke about THAT”

    I specifically stated in all my responses, and went out of my way to do so – I think, I believe, “I” statements. Which means of course this is all my opinion. No one has to feel the same way as me,and I have never
    stated that they had to. I don’t agree with the review or the reviewer speaking for me, but I also would never use the word “suffer” to describe how I felt either. I deal, I live, I adapt, but I never suffer. I even try to see the good, and you can’t do that without having a sense of humor. I have a sense of humor about this whole thing, honestly. I have to laugh that my daughter has inherited my OCD issues, otherwise what else can I do? (aside from making sure she is getting professional help to deal with it) I have to joke and see the lighter side of things in order to survive. That is how I deal, you can deal and do whatever you need to live with it too. But I still stand by my personal opinion.

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    The different between food allergies and OCD is that people with food allergies don’t have their illness misunderstood and trivialized. People understand that it’s dangerous and unfortunate. People think that OCD is cute and funny. You say you have it, so you know it’s not.

    Oh, and I’m not sticking up for an “imaginary group of people”. I’m sticking up for a real group of people whose illness is constantly mocked.

  • Kristy

    What? Food allergies are taking seriously? Now that is the funniest thing I have heard in a long long time. I am chucking out loud here and will be rolling on the floor shortly because that is just rich. I am not offended by what you said though. Yes I am laughing that you could have said that! My sides actually hurt. I have to tell that to FAAN and FARE. Tell them to go home their work is done! I’ll tell my lawyer to stop suing the school my daughter goes to because they don’t allow her to wear her epi pen at all times. Hysterical. Please, tell that to the next person you meet with life threatening allergies. Hey you are going to be fine when you eat out, your illness isn’t trivialized or misunderstood at all. Come back and tell me how that goes! They might not take it as well as me, I will warn you.

    And yes I do think OCD is funny at times, I guess you didn’t read the rest of my post. I don’t suffer, I chose to see the funny side of it. I choose not to be offended because what someone else says has no baring on my life.

    You can tell my therapist I am wrong, however she thinks my outlook is pretty darn good and contributes to my health. So I guess she is wrong in your eyes too. But whatever, you said food allergies are taken seriously, so I guess you are trying to funny too.

  • Shank

    Well…all I can say is that I remain unconvinced. To be clear, I’m not saying you’re wrong to be offended. After all, I fully believe that offence is a subjective concept. I’m only saying that, even after considering everything you’ve said, I just don’t see it. Agree to disagree?

  • Doron Grossman-Naples

    It’s not about whether it’s offensive (although that’s an issue as well). It’s about the image of sexual assault that it presents to its watchers.

  • Tegan Dumpleton

    Alright. I think I’ve read enough. I’ve been reading comments, I read the review and all I can say is… why is everyone being so cynical?

    So what if Moffat was the one to change the rules? So what if the rules changed? Do you WANT Doctor Who to end because of rules made several decades ago?! So what if the episode had lots of exposition? Not every Whovian looks up every piece of Doctor who history on the net! Why does everyone have to work so hard to save the Doctor? Because he’s the guy who is always, ALWAYS trying to save everyone, so maybe he should have a turn every now and again.
    Why does the regeneration energy cause explosions the way it does? It has been shown several times that regeneration energy can be explosive AND we have no idea how much energy the Doctor absorbed. Does the episode bring back old plots, like the silence and the cracks in time? Yes. But it’s explained by the crack and the Silence is back. Why is Tasha in the Tardis? SHE. HAD. A. KEY! Had several scenes explaining he has one of the Tardis keys.
    He kissed her? Truthfully, I didn’t like it when he did it to Jenny. But the doctor always does things that are rude and frustrating like being naked in public without permission. And every time he does so, he is rightfully told off (or in this case, slapped). I was also more okay with this kiss then the one with Jenny, because it was very obvious that there was some “history” between Tasha and the Doctor.

    And more importantly– Why is it wrong for the episode to be a “goodbye” episode? Why is it wrong to look back at all the memories, to say goodbye to Matt Smith and Karen Gillian. Every time we have a new Doctor, we need a “goodbye”. It IS important to the story because without a proper goodbye to the past doctor, it will be harder to accept the new one. This is true with all characters in all fiction.
    This episode tied up numerous plots Moffat had been building up. This isn’t a BAD thing. I would be upset if these plots were dropped or ignored. Keep in mind, this was also Doctor Who’s 800th episode. Moffat or not, Matt Smith, or not, this would have been a BIG episode.
    This was a great episode. It gave a tearful goodbye to Matt Smith. It had a lot of character building and relationships instead of characters just dancing around there feelings for several episodes. It was a great, if quick entrance to Capaldi. It was a good story, good and creative action. And I can’t wait for next season