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Even Female Corporate Mascots Are Subjected to “Fake Geek Girl” Gatekeeping

wendy's chicken nuggets

Most women or girls who have shown a public interest in some form of geekery (comic books, video games, etc.) have probably experienced some form of sexist gatekeeping. Most have encountered at least one man, if not scores of them, who don’t believe their interest in genuine and feel the need to make them prove their knowledge of a subject.

And apparently, that isn’t just restricted to actual women, but fictional ones, as well.

Earlier this week, in the kind of bizarre conversation that can only happen on Twitter, prolific comics writer Gail Simone asked fast-food chain Wendy’s if they preferred Marvel or DC universe. Why? Who knows, although it did come right on the heels of this discussion:

Anyway, Wendy’s wrote back, answering “Marvel,” and Simone went on to ask a number of other brands. A surprising number of them responded.

That’s not even close to all of the responses. And yet Wendy’s is the only company that I could see that encountered this sort of reaction:

And of course more dudes jumped in to make “her” offer proof. Wendy’s wasn’t having any of it, though.

 

This sort of demand for proof of an interest is a bad faith mood and never something you’re required to engage in. You don’t have to live your love of comics or anything else on some jerkwad’s terms.

But I’m glad Wendy’s chose to if only because now we all have the gift of this response:

It’s sad that even corporate logos can get accused of being “fake geek girls,” but it’s always nice to see a gatekeeper get put in their place.

(image: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

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Vivian Kane (she/her) has a lot of opinions about a lot of things. Born in San Francisco and radicalized in Los Angeles, she now lives in Kansas City, Missouri with her husband Brock Wilbur and too many cats.