Donald Trump arrives at a courthouse
(Steven Hirsch for the New York Post-Pool/Getty Images)

We Deserve This!

We can have a little justice, as a treat

When it was announced Thursday afternoon that the jury in Donald Trump’s hush money trial had reached a verdict, my expectations were low. We’ve all been through this before, hoping this time Trump would face justice for his latest offense, only to be consistently disappointed. But not this time!

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After seeing Trump wriggle his way out of accountability time after time, a jury has handed down a verdict declaring Trump GUILTY on all 34 charges related to the case. This makes him the first former president to be convicted of a felony after falsifying records in order to influence an election. (Boy, it’s nice to not have to throw the word “allegedly” in there anymore.)

So what’s next? Trump will now move into the sentencing phase, which will be handled by Judge Juan Merchan, whom Trump has spent recent weeks attacking on social media. That’s scheduled for July 11—just days before the Republican National Convention, where Trump is assumed to be officially named the Republicans’ presidential nominee.

Trump will also undoubtedly begin the appeals process as soon as possible. In the meantime, he’s keeping himself busy outside the courthouse, ranting about the trial being “rigged” (it wasn’t) and angrily rambling about immigration (sure). So, business as usual for Trump the convicted felon.


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Vivian Kane
Vivian Kane (she/her) is the Senior News Editor at The Mary Sue, where she's been writing about politics and entertainment (and all the ways in which the two overlap) since the dark days of late 2016. Born in San Francisco and radicalized in Los Angeles, she now lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where she gets to put her MFA to use covering the local theatre scene. She is the co-owner of The Pitch, Kansas City’s alt news and culture magazine, alongside her husband, Brock Wilbur, with whom she also shares many cats.