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Why Not Do It With Some Style?

Wonder Woman Kicks Butt in Slow-Mo In This Glorious New Fan Film


The latest filmmakers to decide “You’re not going to make a Wonder Woman movie? Fine. We’ll make one our own dang selves” (Exhibit A. Exhibit B.) hail from Rainfall Films. They’ve created a moody, atmospheric two minutes and thirty seconds of Diana kicking both human and monster butt, and it is a thing to behold.

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  • Anonymous

    Love it!

  • Yurifan

    LOVE THIS SO MUCH!!

  • Anonymous

    Dear Hollywood:

    GIVE TO US THIS THING RIGHT HERE.

  • Anonymous

    So now, come and tell me again that Wonder Woman’s costume would look ridiculous and that a woman can’t fly!!!! I dare you!!!!

    You know what. All those fan works, films, trailers, etc. are not good for me. Because they leave me always behind terribly frustrated and yearning for that 200 Million Dollar version Warner Brothers is refusing to make. For… whatever reason. It’s just a shame.

    There will be “Superman vs. Batman”, then – maybe – the “Justice League” but never that stand-alone film that Diana so very rightfully deserves. Just because Warners is afraid.

    Oh, my… I think I’m going to watch some old Xena-episodes right now…!

  • Anonymous

    Those are some big minotaurs.
    The only things I have to nitpick is how they made her bracelets strapped-on plates instead of fully enclosed cuffs & I prefer her tiar star to be red.

  • Nicole Elizabeth Currie

    ‘Too tricky’ and can’t be done my ass!

  • Anonymous

    Personally, I liked the strap-on plates. Articulation would make wrist and muscle movement much easier. The adoption of a centurion-like design, complete with leather kilt (of sorts) does to the historic comic book versions what the leather/armor Batman costumes did with that character: made a spiffy artistic design into a feasible bit of gear and armor, as much or more about purpose as about appearance. I especially like that it looked a bit worn – used and abused, not stored in a closet in a dry-cleaning sleeve.

    I lean towards a more righteously angry Diana, but the juxtaposition of combat with mere human thugs and mountainous minotaurs (wow, that sounds like an early D&D module right there) was suited by the distant look….conveying a bit of ”bored now” when combatting lowly mortal types.

  • http://runt.org/ Adrian

    I had to fix the music. Here’s Wonder Woman fan-trailer + Heart performing ‘Stairway’

    http://youtubedoubler.com/ajxd

  • Anonymous

    Having straps means they can be removed & have a weakness. Neither feature is an option in the source material. Her bracelets were forged by Hephaestus to be unbreakable whilst remaining beautiful. The catch is that they’re generally unremoveable (though this varries depending upon which continuity DC is on). Diana wins the honour of wearing them by combat before becoming Themyscria’s ambassador. Unremoveable bracelets reminds her that her responsibility to bring peace to the world is perpetual. This also evokes the bondage themes of her creation but in a less overtly sexual way. They shouldn’t look practical like centurion gear because they’re Divine armour. If they stop below her wrist, hand articulation shouldn’t be a problem. Giving the other Amazons more realistic vambraces is fine though since they have inferior gear to Diana.

  • Anonymous

    I approve of the fanfilm community’s public shaming of DC.

  • CompassRing

    I would watch the hell out of this!

  • Eisen

    A bit melodramatic for my taste but really well made.

  • Anonymous

    Dude. Put on a wide, fitted cuff bracelet at wrist level. Then rotate your wrist. Then rotate it rapidly while punching someone. Or holding something heavy. It’s not easy, and it hurts. And while there’s a long tradition of ridiculously unrealistic female costuming (and even male costuming), this depiction of Diana would seem to be practical and direct… not the sort of woman who’d smile through the pain for the sake of preserving a certain look, but the sort who would rip off limiting attire in disgust and find something that worked better. Of course, presumably if it’s built by the gods, it’s better in the first place.

    This is what I mean about translating artistry into believable gear. I get the divine origin, but making a costume wearable, practical, and functional in no way violates the concept of divine design, especially when the designer was crafting for warriors, not mannequins. Hephaestus must have included some leather in most of his armor, at least as padding/ buckling/ belts. It’s either include flexible materials like leather (which could of course be made unremovable by similar godly-power logic), or have flexible metal, which seems less likely to resist bullets or allow a broadside.

    The third option is that WW doesn’t rotate her wrists by more than a few degrees. You know, like a Barbie doll. Myself, I prefer a WW who is based on action, not posing.

  • LifeLessons

    Like. :)

  • Anonymous

    Beautiful, well done. No criticism of what I saw. I would love to see Wonder Woman taking down some baddies.

    I’m just a little bothered, maybe concerned is a better word, over the direction WW has been pushed in in recent years. She seems to be getting more militant with each incarnation. During her newest appearance in The Flash Point Paradox for example, WW is portrayed as a full on murder machine. Granted, its an alternate timeline but she does the worst thing you could imagine a woman doing (in societal terms, not that women haven’t done this). And in the wake of the Superman-Kills-Zod controversy there’s not one word about WW’s actions. Not even a peep.

    Now I’m fine with the creative direction both Supes & WW took in my examples. I love explorations of well known characters. Its the trend of how WW is being consistently portrayed, of how we’re wanting her to be portrayed. Maybe its because I grew up with Wonder Woman standing side by side with the most powerful men in the universe and coming away being the most human. She always seemed to be the voice of reason among the titanic flying fists.

    I want a WW who can bring the pain to those that deserve it, but be compassionate to those who need it. I want a WW who can lead her troops into battle as easily as she can guide them to rendering aid to that same enemy. I want her to be human, to be an ideal woman (I don’t mean measurements wise, large breasts should not be a character trait). i hope that doesn’t come across as sexist, the one scene I missed having in Man of Steel was Superman drawing a kitten out of a tree and handing it to a little girl. Wonder Woman needs to be that kind of hero.

  • Anonymous

    Kinda cool. But what if those minotaurs were just coming to ask the Amazons for some sort of assistance…like helping them pick some splinters from the soles of their feet?

  • Anonymous

    Kinda cool. But what if those minotaurs were just coming to ask the Amazons for some sort of assistance…like helping them pick some splinters from the soles of their feet?

  • Anonymous

    The way I interpretted it was that there is no need for Haephaestus to included leather in the bracelets because once Diana put them on them on their unbreakable metal magically adjusted to ideally fit her arms. So the cuffs wouldn’t impede her movement or circulation like a manmade bracelet of similar design. As God of Meatlsmithing, Hephaestus doesn’t need to sacrifice beauty for utility like mere mortals. If they’re going for a design that makes Diana’s costume more functional (which is an approach I agree with), keeping her bracelets elegant is an excellent visual contrast to show that they’re as unique as she is rather than standard issue gear any Amazon could step out of an armoury with.

  • Anonymous

    The way I interpretted it was that there is no need for Haephaestus to included leather in the bracelets because once Diana put them on them on their unbreakable metal magically adjusted to ideally fit her arms. So the cuffs wouldn’t impede her movement or circulation like a manmade bracelet of similar design. As God of Meatlsmithing, Hephaestus doesn’t need to sacrifice beauty for utility like mere mortals. If they’re going for a design that makes Diana’s costume more functional (which is an approach I agree with), keeping her bracelets elegant is an excellent visual contrast to show that they’re as unique as she is rather than standard issue gear any Amazon could step out of an armoury with.

  • Anonymous

    Amazons are an ancient pagan warrior society, so they wouldn’t share the modern mainstream relious view that killing is morally wrong. Since Diana was raised by Amazons to be a warriror from childhood, she should be well versed in how to kill. Just because she is willing & non-conflicted about killing unrepentant enemies, however, doesn’t mean she has to be an icy murderess all the time. She’d absolutely try to non-lethally disarm mortal foes & give them a chance to reform. When fighting a mega-powerful foe who shows no desire for redemption, she’d not hesitate to slay them in order to protect innocents. Then she’d focus on aiding any victims. (She may participate in purification rituals later to stave off vengeful spirits.) This is a cultural difference from someone like Superman who never wants to kill anyone because he was raised as a Christian American. The controversial scene in Man of Steel should reinforce his anti-murder stance by proving to him firsthand that it’s something he never wants to have to do again.
    I think it’s important to keep this cultural distinction rather than homogenizing her values. It’s completely possible that Wonder Woman can be a compassionate and virtuous role model even if she has classical views on killing for the greater good.

  • Harrison Grey

    I am loving all of these Wonder Woman shorts, but do they all have to be Nolan-style color drained and gritty? Can we have the colorful, sweet, and inspirational Wonder Woman from, like, Superman/Batman: Apocalypse?

  • Harrison Grey

    But Wonder Woman was created as a character who was supposed to symbolize resolving conflicts peacefully and through love and understanding, which most modern interpretations ingore in favor of casting her as just Xena, Warrior Princess. The aspect of her as an Amazon warrior needs to come second in how she’s portrayed. There’s supposed to be a difference between the mythological Amazons of real life Greece/Rome and the fictional ones of Wonder Woman’s mythology.

  • Anonymous

    Freaking awesome!!!!!!!! Feeling extreme fan girl love right now. I want to see more. So what the problem? Major eye roll for WB. This outfit is fitting of the warrior Diana is. She looks powerful and sexy, not cheap and overexposed like that horrible costume for the failed re-envisioned Wonder Woman tv show by David Kelly.

  • Anonymous

    Ugh, this was so lovely that it hurt. I love it so much. Give me a Wonder Woman movie! This ain’t ‘tricky.’

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think those are mutually exclusive. She will spend the bulk of her effort encouraging non-violent resolution to conflict, but she’s pragmatic enough to dispatch anyone who’s a continual & irredeemable affront to peace. She was not brought up with mainstream morality that killing is never justified, but she’s powerful & crafty enough that she doesn’t immediately resort to murder if she doesn’t have to. It’s entirely possible to show her virtuously committed to improving human rights throughout the globe even if she’s not rigidly anti-death as Batman & Superman.

  • Anonymous

    OMG!!!!! WHY IS THIS NOT REAL!?!?

  • Anonymous

    Maybe they were polite & old fashioned enough to send a herald announcing their plans to attack on Tuesday at sun-up if the Amazons didn’t have anything else on for that day?

  • http://cainslatrani.blogspot.com/ Cain S. Latrani

    Wow. Loved what they did with the costume. Classic, yet better. Everything about it, really, was just better.

    How is this hard? I mean, c’mon!

  • http://melancholywise.tumblr.com/ Sophie

    I tend to like a little from both worlds. I really love that Wonder Woman is a violence-as-a-last-resort type character. It’s a lot of the reason I prefer her as a hero, from her counterparts who like to solve problems by punching them (and one of the many reasons I can’t stomach her current run). But I like the pragmatism of her role in Rucka’s run, in which notably she kills twice. Compared to a lot of other superhero comics the violence on her part during this Rucka’s run is pretty minimal, and tempered by the fact that she is often using it as a means of subduing or stalling rather than with the aim of hurting, something I wish was more common. However when she has to use violence or even kill, she does so without second guessing herself.
    Batman and Superman I think both have very good reasons why they shouldn’t kill, but it lends staticity to their battles, which gets repetitive. It’s nice to have a character that works to a different morality.

  • Anonymous

    They are part herbivorous. Now I feel bad for them.

    “Pardon me, have you got any Grey -OWWW!! MY EYE!!”

  • Anonymous

    The only way that works is if the metal is flexible. If they were to depict it with micro-links to allow some flexibility, I could see it. But rigid metal only works if you never put a live human in it. In other words, it’s fine for cartoons and comics. But for live action, not so much.

    There’s been a trend towards making costumes more purposeful and ornamental: witness the vast difference between Reeve’s Superman and the recent version, or Adam West’s Batman vs the past two decades. I think this is a smart trend: it makes the world in which these heroes act a bit more realistic, and a bit less two-dimensional. I think one of the things which has held WW back has been the difficulty Hollywood seems to make over how to adapt her costume in the same manner…but as we can see from these fan adaptions, the difficulty is of their own making.

  • Nick Gaston

    Eh, a bit clumsy and amateurish in spots…and it’s still better than what DC’s putting out. Y’know, NOTHING.

  • Anonymous

    Honestly, I think that WOULD be a prescription for failure with the modern audience. It may be a reflection of our currently rather stressed/ recessed/ cynical culture, with the rainbow-hugging hippies replaced by bitter Gen X as the primary tone-setters, but the successful movies currently, the ones which hold substantial audience appeal, are darker, bleaker, more apocalyptic, less optimistic, than they were 20-30 years ago.

    Plus, if they were going to make a colorful, sweet, inspirational movie, that tone far better fit the big blue Boy Scout than the Amazon. If they’re ever to cross over (and they will), I really don’t want a warrior who looks and acts like a sweet, feather-headed dreamer mixing in with the current versions of Supes and Bats. That would effectively make her the fluffy throwaway relief character. You might as well give her pompoms if she’s just going to be a cheerleader.

  • Matt Baen

    I think it’s a very effective proof of concept piece that shows how awesome WW would be in both a God of War/Immortals-like scene and a Haywire/Bourne-esque scene.

  • Anonymous

    I agree she should be compassionate. But this shouldn’t be because she’s a woman. It should be because she’s a hero.

  • Anonymous

    She should have compassion because that’s who she is as a person. That is what makes her a hero.

    That said, Wonder Woman is a woman. If we reject that aspect of the character what’s the point. Then she’s Superman with a different name. I think it would be a mistake not to see the world through HER eyes. We shouldn’t focus on her sex but we shouldn’t be afraid of it either.

  • Anonymous

    That makes sense if they’re made by humans from ordinary materials. The comics specifically show that they’re literally impervious amongst other physical impossibilities because they’re made by a God from divine metal. Why only commit halfway to divine armour? If you really want them to look “realistic”, why not cut out Hephaestus alltogether & have conventional Amazonian vambraces that wouldn’t be able to do the bullet deflecting in the first place? I have no problem with the rest of her outfit being more functional looking, but the bracelets should stand out from the rest of her kit as something beyond the ken of mortals. If audiences can accept that Wonder Woman is empowered by the Gods then they shouldn’t have a problem believing that her bracelets (& lasso) aren’t bound by the constraints of what people can make.

  • Anonymous

    It’s not fear of gender that makes me roll my eyes every time someone says “I don’t mean to be sexist, but she should be soft inside and out on account of having girl-junk.” It’s annoyance at this ridiculous June Cleaver stereotype. You know what? Women can and do kick ass. Women can and do behave with ruthless pragmatism. Women can and do kill. Some women can and do fight for the pleasure of beating the snot out of someone, or proving themselves against an able opponent. Sometimes women do things which we would classify as evil. Compassion is not an automatic aspect of being female.

    In a warrior (or at least warrior friendly) society where she’s the physical pinnacle, I think there’d be far more of a basis to explore her from her perspective within what is only a stereotypically masculine role in our world, not in her culture. Does her incredible physical prowess make it hard for her to relate to and empathize with those who are physically weaker? Is this something she has to guard against? Does she get irritated when she sees cultures where women are presumed to accept a backseat, and may adopt accommodating behaviors because that’s what they see modeled? What’s her response to getting this treatment from weak, overly indulged males? I’m thinking it wouldn’t necessarily be compassion.

  • Anonymous

    The comics aren’t working with an actual human skeleton and its limitations. How are you going to manage this magical soft-yet-hard metal with costuming? CGI? Or a soft material painted to be shiny? Neither will look as impressive as this, in the same way as red-undies -over-blue-long-undies (or black undies over light blue long undies) doesn’t look as impressive as the recent upgrades. The lack of realistic movement won’t make them look godly. It will make them look silly.

  • Anonymous

    The movies could do a good job of showing how Wonder Woman changes her approach to meet various situations:
    1. When she’s trying to end wars between human soldiers, she doesn’t kill any of them because she far outclasses them & they can be taught peace. She diarms both army’s weapons at superspeed & at most knocks them out. Then she gives aid to any refugees. She can also use her lasso to facillitate peace talks between the warring nations.
    2. When fighting someone who’s superpowered but not inherently evil like Giganta, she gives them the option to reform first. “I could kill you because you’re a metahuman threat, but that’d be a waste of your potential.” This inspires Giganta to use her brains & powers to help Wonder Woman in the finale. (Hopefully Grodd & the Atom are also involved in this movie.)
    3. She uses lethal force against someone like Cheetah that devalues human life, has the power to kill her, & refuses offers of mercy. “That was unfortunate, but I won’t lose sleep over saving 7 billion people at the cost of sending you to Tartarus.”

  • Thomas Hayes

    I would like her to be brighter, more colourful and more positive too, as I would with Superman.

    However, while Apocalypse’s Wonder Woman is colourful and is an absolute badass, you are talking about the film where she and Batman outright try to kidnap Supergirl because she thinks she can do a better job at training her than her own cousin can and doesn’t even try to talk to Kara or Clark before taking action. Now, I like that film, and I really like Wonder Woman in it in some respects (because her and Barda vs the Furies fight scene is totally awesome), but it was adapted from a comic by Jeph Loeb. His view of Wonder Woman was that she’s basically Thor – “As a near god like hero, Wonder Woman does not feel she has to ask anyone for something she feels that has to be done.” – and there far less compassion or sweetness from Wonder Woman in Apocalypse than there is in every other animated incarnation of her I’ve seen. Sweet she is not! I first watched Apocalypse immediately after the Wonder Woman animated movie and the contrast was quite jarring. By the way, here’s the source for my Loeb quote: http://comicboxcommentary.blogspot.co.uk/2011/01/news-from-blog-friends-part-1.html

  • Anonymous

    Having compassion doesn’t make a woman June Cleaver. Why is it we can demand Superman show compassion for Zod (have you read a fan site lately)? Why do writers insist the sociopath Batman doesn’t kill or use guns? Why are only men looked upon to have a better self? But asking Wonder Woman to have a compassionate side is a bad thing? Because pearl necklace, wtf?

    Being angry is not a personality. Even the Hulk has a softer side. But not Wonder Woman because she has so much to be angry about.

    Fascinating to know what kind of person you think Diana is. Your Diana would unsheathe her sword to cut down the overly indulged males rather then become a teacher. She would blow the war horns before becoming a leader in a society where women take a backseat. You think Wonder Woman is about blood lust and revenge.

    Have you seen The Flash Point Paradox? The show I alluded to in my first post. Wonder Woman, your Diana, kills a young teenage boy. Murders him so he can’t become Shazam. That’s where your ‘warrior woman’ is at these days. Oh, and its over an affair she had with Aquaman. Real foreword, non-June Cleaver stuff.

    So, yeah I like my Wonder Woman a bit more complicated than that.

  • Anonymous

    I like your later comment as its a bit more on point.

    My comment is more appropriate to what you’ve said here: What you’ve said about the Amazons is true as far as their reported culture goes (reported by their vanquishers, as history often is). Per her origin Diana rejects the Amazon way for something more even handed. Its why she left the island to fight with America against the Axis. I think that makes her a more interesting character. She has a heritage which approves of crushing your enemies and a conscience that can distinguish true evil from misguided intentions. I’d like her to have a strong, fully rounded character.

  • Anonymous

    Immediately after watching this the Wonder Woman action figure I keep at my desk keeled right the fuck over face first. ::sigh:: I feel you, girl. I feel you…

  • Anonymous

    it’s not so black and white as ‘compassion isn’t reflexive, and therefore it is KILL ALL THE THINGS, because there’s no logical, unemotional basis to not kill all the things!’ i’m not saying Diana would kill American men for disrespecting her prowess. I do think she’d probably find it irritatingly short-sighted and not have a lot of patience with it, and I could see her having to work to rein in that impatience.

    I’m not opposed to WW being compassionate; I think it suits her as a secondary characteristic, although I don’t think she’d let it stand in the way of doing what she saw as necessary, including killing. I’m opposed to the presumption that she would reflexively be compassionate because of her gender, and that, if she’s depicted without obligatory ‘feminine’ compassion, it’s because someone was afraid of exploring her gender. Gender does not obligate compassion, tenderness, weakness, strength, logic, etc. These traits are independent.

  • John W

    What’s that expression? Proof of Concept.

  • Angela

    Thomas Wayne Batman also uses guns. Criticizing the alternative Wonder Woman in The Flash Point Paradox is kind of pointless because none of the characters are like themselves.

  • Angela

    It is my understanding this these were just night shots. Themyscira’s atmosphere is bright and beautiful, which has always been highlighted.

  • Harrison Grey

    If Hollywood can only do a bleak, cynical, violent Wonder Woman movie, then I’d rather they not make a movie. I say the same for Superman, and having seen Man of Steel, I stand by that opinion.

    And I wasn’t saying “feather-headed dreamer”; I was saying inspirational. She’s supposed to be a character who reasons with her enemies and tries to resolve conflict peacefully, as opposed to just hitting things.

  • Harrison Grey

    And this was one of the better Wonder Woman shorts I’ve seen recently in that regard. But most of them so far have felt on the grittier side of her depiction, like, for instance, having terrorists (or very terrorist-y looking dudes) subbing in as the non descript bad guys.

  • Harrison Grey

    I hesitated to use Apocalypse because of that very scene, but the rest of the movie did seem to focus on her being kind, nurtering, and inspirational. They have Supergirl, Barda, and Harbinger all talk about how much she’s inspired them, and those were the bits I was talking about. I like the Wonder Woman solo movie, but it felt a bit heavy on the ‘grrrl power’, and the Justice League animated series portrayed her a bit Thor-like (brash and fairly irritable at times). Funny, with the exception of the kidnapping, I thought Apocalypse focused on ‘inspirational’ Wonder Woman more than some of the other projects I’ve seen.

  • Harrison Grey

    Rucka’s run was good; I won’t say I have no complaints about the Maxwell Lord bit, but they’re complaints with what DC did to that character, not how Rucka handled it. I loved Gail Simone’s run, which kind of dealt with that aftermath, presenting a situation where she doesn’t kill and one immediately after where she does. I will say, as much as I am totally, completely against Superman and Batman killing (and prefer most superheroes don’t) Wonder Woman is a character I see having exceptions, but they really should be extreme situations (and I mena more extreme than normal superheroics). Personally, I wouldn’t have had her kill Maxwell Lord, but Medusa I was more okay with (though, again personally, I would have had Medusa be redeemable and have Wonder Woman redeem her).

  • Harrison Grey

    I’d argue not to kill Cheetah, mostly because I want Cheetah to stick around as a viable, reusable villain. If she’s got to kill, I kind of like the idea of it only being figures from ‘her world’, ie her killing Ares or Medusa. When she killed Maxwell Lord, they made a big deal about her killing an American citizen, and there’s kind of a point to that, her being from a foreign island and all.

    Also, if the Atom you’re referring to is Ryan Choi, you’ve got yourself a deal.

  • Anonymous

    It’s a matter of contrast. Against the Christopher Reeve Superman, optimistic and even sweet would have been in keeping. Well, optimistic. Really, I can’t see a lot of sweet remaining in WW once she’s had some time to interact with a culture that largely labels her gender as a liability. Puzzlement, followed by disbelief, followed by indignant WTF-you’ve-got-to-be-kidding, followed by a whole lot of disdain for those who saw her gender as a defining limitation, mebbe.

    But anyway, the darker depiction of Superman
    makes it very hard for a lighter, colorful, sweet WW to be perceived as non-trivial.

  • Harrison Grey

    Then screw the darker interpretation of Superman. I’m not necessarily talking a version of Wonder Woman to sync with the current movie franchises, I’m talking an ideal, ‘this is what DC should do’ kind of Wonder Woman presentation (movie, comics, cartoons, wherever), and in this ideal lineup, Man of Steel would never have gotten made.

  • Anonymous

    That’s true of her Golden Age origins where Marston used some superficial Amazon elements without putting much thought into whether a warrior culture would develop into a Pollyanish utopia in all ways including high tech medicine. Wonder Woman didn’t kill because he wanted to promote victory through “loving submission”, which could be could easily be sugarcoating the regular way of conquest. While he wanted to make her a better role model than the Nazis, he couldn’t show her using her her powers & skills to end WWII single handedly because that’d be a little “too” escapist (also a Superman problem of this era). If she took an afternoon to kill all the Axis leaders, she surely would’ve gotten more medals than scoldings about how killing is never justifiable.

  • Thomas Hayes

    Thinking about Apocalypse after commenting here forced me to rewatch it, and I see what you mean, there are those moments. I like this movie quite a bit in spite of its issues and like Wondy’s portrayal, a lot of them are from the source material. I’m a dyed-in-the-wool Supergirl fan and it’s one of the few things I’ve got to see her in, aside from this year’s Superman:Unbound and the live-action movie (which is not a good film). Loeb wasn’t all that sound on portraying her either, but from what I’ve gathered the film is actually kinder to both Supergirl and Wonder Woman than the comic is. I haven’t read that story, but I’ve read enough about them to have picked up on the differences in the adaptation, and it’s hard not to get the feeling that the team behind Apocalypse cared a lot more for Supergirl than Loeb did and they seem to have softened up Wonder Woman’s portrayal somewhat in the film too. I don’t know if the scenes you’re mentioning are Loeb’s creation or theirs, but I know for a fact that the action finale is very different from how Loeb played it and this is definitely to Supergirl’s benefit. The film gives Supergirl an active role in defeating Darkseid, which the comic did not and likewise that new climax gives her an actual arc in the film which the comic didn’t (because it was setting up her own comic book series which Loeb was the initial writer on and helped to drive into the ground). So I’m very grateful to writer Tab Murphy, director Lauren Montgomery and the producers led by Bruce Timm for fixing all that. And also for adapting Mike Turner’s art style without his excesses, too.

  • Thomas Hayes

    I’m with you on this one.

  • Anonymous

    Unfortunately, i think it’s unlikely that it will be possible to separate WW from the othe franchises, without a decade time delay. Avengers set the bar for integrated superhero teams. If WW gets her day in the near future, Justice League will,follow.

  • Anonymous

    I’m deadset against killing Ares because he’s a GOD. Modern secular notions that Gods can be killed especially if they’re not worshipped completely undermines their power. Since Wonder Woman is made by Olympian magic, making the Olympians mortal drastically undermines both her & her archenemy. Instead I’d have Ares mostly be the force manipulating her enemies throughout the series. She may be able to temporarily thwart him, but it’d be a continual struggle rather than her being able to end all war forever by destroying Ares.
    Since Cheetah is the most venal of her rogues (maybe she’s tied with Dr. Psycho & Circe), I think there would be the least outrage over her being killed. Turning into a ravenous monster outweighs her citizenship. Cheetah’s stature among her enemies would also show that Diana is serious about slaying villains no matter how famous they are, but Diana doesn’t have to kill her off in her first movie appearance though. She could debut as a ruthless treasure hunter in the first movie & evolve into Cheetah by the franchise’s finale (or whichever Justice League movie has the Legion of Doom) after scoffing at numerous opportunities to redeem herself.
    Of course the Atom in the Giganta scenario would have to be Ryan Choi.

  • Anonymous

    I imagine they’d use a combination of techniques & materials depending upon what type of shots a given scene calls for, much like how movies use both real metal swords for hero shots & rubber swords for fight scenes. Given that CGI can now make a convincing Iron Man suit out of just pixels, I don’t think it’d be too much trouble for the effects team to make a cloth bracelet look metallic or to blend the segments of a jointed metal bracelet.

  • Anonymous

    I would say that the new Superman is not ”Dark” at all.

    The movie was ”dark”.

    Superman was conflicted at parts, but he had some bright moments.

  • Anonymous

    I really feel that the short was relying too much on the use of slow and that the flying scene at the end looked really awkward.

    Instead of relying on visuals, tell us a story along with those like the World Finest trailer did or the Batman vs Alien vs Predator short film did, not just a bunch of fight scenes in slow motion.

    I mean the people that this obviously had some budget, but not the creativity to make the best of it.

  • Anonymous

    Marston’s personal peccadilloes aside, the Amazons of the current Wonder Woman era are more Spartan than Amazon. We don’t know enough about the real Amazons to make an argument about a fictional character’s motivations. My point is Diana doesn’t need to be the one dimensional character she is being pigeonholed as by today’s comic book culture. Also, why was Superman allowed to remain the good boyscout while Wonder Woman was pushed toward the killer aspect of the culture she at first rejected. Superman faced a backlash when they tried to make him edgier. And don’t give me that christian stuff, that’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing culture if there ever was one.

  • Anonymous

    Right! Thomas Wayne, not Bruce, used a gun. Actually, all those characters in TFPP remained true to their motivations given the circumstances. Besides, I’m not criticizing that version of WW. I’m pointing out how that version has become the more accepted version. WW has slowly been pushed toward violence, right to the point that no one says squat about her murdering a child when she didn’t have to. You even defend it – you ignored it, you justified her with ‘well, everyone else is doing it’.

  • Anonymous

    Wonder Woman originally left Paradise Island to spread Amazonian peace ideology by defeating the Nazis whilst dating Steve Trevor. She didn’t reject Amazonian culture because Golden Age Amazons were basically Hippies.
    Wonder Woman can definitely be a well rounded character that strikes a balance between never killing & killing everyone. It doesn’t have to be an either/or situation.
    Hopefully a Wonder Woman movie will ignore the New 52 as much as possible.

  • http://melancholywise.tumblr.com/ Sophie

    I totally get the issues with Maxwell Lord’s characterisation. I hadn’t read anything with him in until the sacrifice storyline so obviously it wasn’t something that bothered me personally, but you can see the lazy editorial meddling all the way through that storyline. However as for him being killed, the story goes out of its way to show it’s a no-win situation, and I actually think it’s one of Diana’s more iconic moments. I think killing Medusa is easier to justify because she looks like a monster, but the situations are similar, and the fact that Diana acts the same way in both is an important, because it shows she’s concerned with what’s in people’s hearts rather than how they look.
    I like that the DCU heroes are mostly against killing, and that it’s a moral status that does lend itself to redemption storylines, and I really wouldn’t want that to change.
    However redemption is kind of an easy moral out, which isn’t always possible. There are certainly people in this world who want to do harm, and cannot be talked down or redeemed for whatever reason. There aren’t many of them because people aren’t just evil or good, but it happens, and we as a society have to deal with that. I really wish that superhero stories would deal with complex moral decision making more often. It’s comforting to think of the world as a place where people can be redeemed or can be split into good and bad, but it’s not really good for us as a society to have such a simplistic world view.
    I don’t ever want Diana to become a character that kills without thought. But I think her political situation gives her authority to take a life in extreme circumstances, which the other two of the trinity don’t have.
    Thematically, when you look at Wonder Woman as a feminist metaphor, the struggle between violence and non-violence in her character is very appropriate. It’s a struggle that has run all the way through most social justice movements. The suffragettes vs. the suffragists as it were.
    People often cite this as a character weakness, but I think it makes her more well rounded and relatable.

  • Anonymous

    …I can just cram money into the USB slot, right?

    To get my Wonder Woman movie?

    I mean, it’s not perfect, and it’s not how I would do it, but dammitall, that’s WONDER WOMAN TAKE MY MONEY PLEASE

  • Allen Slea

    It’s comics, and given the mythic nature of things, a Resurrection is not out of the question. Maybe the Cheetah mantle could be passed to another.

  • Allen Slea

    It’s comics, and given the mythic nature of things, a Resurrection is not out of the question. Maybe the Cheetah mantle could be passed to another.

  • Marya

    And I just imagined Wonder Woman teaming up with Lady Sif … I know it’s impossible, but please, just imagine it…

  • Anonymous

    Meh, I was disappointed. I thought it was going to be an actual story with dialogue, not a 2-minute slow-mo fight scene. And even in that capacity I felt it was subpar. There was no real connection between the blows WW landed and the effect on her opponents (they sometimes flew off, spinning for some reason, in a different direction than her punch/kick was traveling); she just looked awkward when throwing the spear; and there was way, way, waaay too much melodramatic “serious-face” posturing. It was like a caricature of 300 or Sucker Punch.

    That said, the costume was definitely awesome.

  • Harrison Grey

    My trouble with no-win scenarios is that it was a writer who made it a no-win scenario. To me it feels like there was no third option because the writer was too lazy to come up with a third option, or else because the writer wanted so badly to go “grown up serious” that they overrode what makes superheroes super. Superheroes are such an optimistic, idealistic creation that 9 times out of 10, them killing feels wrong for the medium under just about any circumstance. The whole Maxwell Lord thing was one of those times that never felt right to me, and again that was all on DC’s editorial staff, not on Greg Rucka. (Unrelated aside, if you still haven’t read anything from pre-evil Maxwell Lord, read the Justice League International. It’s not just because of him, the whole comic is amazing and hilarious).

    Now, I will add, on the subject of Wonder Woman killing Maxwell Lord and Medusa, both being monsters but only one looking the part, this was where I actually was less okay with the death of Medusa. They very pointedly brought up the difference between them, and basically said it was totally ok that she killed Medusa because everyone could see she was a monster. But it felt like (to me) it would have been better in the long run to have Medusa, who looked like a monster, be redeemable and Maxwell Lord, who looked fine but was secretly terrible, be irredeemable and get killed. They even told us Medusa’s origin and made us feel sorry for her, and then say we shouldn’t just because she had the hubris to fall in love with a god. Just felt like a missed opportunity to make a redeemable monster and really drive home a point about Wonder Woman.

    You do bring up a very interesting point about the violence/non-violence feminist thing.

  • Angela

    Well that’s my point. Bruce wouldn’t have wanted his dad to be using guns. And no, that’s not it at all. I just understand that this an an alternative universe that doesn’t exist, so no point in criticizing a WW that’s not really WW.

  • weiai412

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  • http://www.facebook.com/nuuni.nuunani Nuuni Nuunani

    If you compare new 52′s wonder woman to the golden age take (keeping in mind that people generally consider the golden age to be pretty dark stuff in comics) or heck, even the 90s material, she has gotten darker and grimmer and more bloodthirsty.

  • http://melancholywise.tumblr.com/ Sophie

    I think you could argue that about anything. All situations within the story are created by the writer. I feel like the intensity of that situation was necessary for the story. Perhaps both of these characters could have been redeemed but I’m not sure that’s the point. The idea was that they were an immediate and major threat, and she does what the situation calls for. It’s the only circumstances under which I can see her killing. There’s talk down thread of ‘dispatching’ people, but that’s not ever what I want from my heroes. She’s not judge jury and executioner, her job is to save people.
    I’ve been thinking about the idea of Medusa as the monster, and I kind of do wish that she had had a redemption story. The myth of Medusa, much like the tale of the Amazons, was warped into something increasingly misogynistic through retelling. There’s a misinterpreted monster aspect to her and it’s very heavily tied up in ideas of male fear of female power, so I don’t think that she works well as an enemy for Diana, on a thematic level.
    Wonder Woman writers often get very tied up in the Greek mythology part of her story and forget that she’s supposed to subvert the original myths, not play into them. Ironically the idea behind the Amazons is that masculine society saw a group of women who ruled themselves and warped them into monsters through writing, which is exactly what DC comics have now done.

  • Harrison Grey

    Thank you, you said that whole bit about Wonder Woman subverting Greek mythology better than I could. That’s a lot of what troubles me with most modern versions of Wonder Woman, and even when people are cheering on doing WW “right”, this is usually what they think that is. DC’s been working far too long off of a poor translation of Wonder Woman that it’s what most people assume the character is anymore, and I wish we’d see the original intent of the character shine through far more often. George Perez remains one of the best writers I’ve seen handle this aspect of telling the “original story” that got misogynized through years of mythology, and I think DC should do more to promote and remember his run.

    I mostly appreciate what Greg Rucka did with Medusa on account of what he was obviously trying to do, which is tell a badass tale of epic, mythological Wonder Woman. He was trying to show Wonder Woman’s compassion and drive through the lens of the kid Medusa turned to stone. But in doing so he made Medusa into a straight monster when there was great opportunity with the figure to do something much more interesting and much less basic. It was particularly egregious because in the issue right before she showed up we got a retelling of Medusa’s origin that made us (and Wonder Girl) feel sorry for her and then he specifically tells us not to sympathise because she brought it on herself by falling in love with a God.

  • odango atama

    See, H-wood. Is it really that hard?

  • Hellfist

    This is wonder woman 100% hollywood should set up and take notice, She is a warrior first and foremost. Her heart is well protected like and Iron fortress, proud and self sufficient, and never backs down will fight with her last breath to save those ideas and people who she loves and hold dear.