comScore
  1. Mediaite
  2. Gossip Cop
  3. Geekosystem
  4. Styleite
  5. SportsGrid
  6. The Mary Sue
  7. The Maude
  8. The Braiser

What's with the name?

Allow us to explain.

Supergirly

There’s a New Ms. Marvel, and She’s a Shapeshifting Muslim Teen From Jersey City


Kelly Sue DeConnick‘s much lauded Captain Marvel series heralded the beginning of a new stage in the life of Carol Danvers. In the absence of her friend Mar-Vell, she took on his superhero name: no longer Ms. Marvel, she was now simply Captain Marvel. Of course, that leaves the name of Ms. Marvel hanging empty, and Marvel Comics has just announced how they will be filling it.

In February, Kamala Khan will be taking on the mantle of Ms. Marvel in her very own title written by G. Willow Wilson, writer and Islamic convert. Kamala, like lots of people I know (or know through Tumblr), is a big fan of Carol Danvers, and when she discovers that she has shape-shifting powers she borrows the first superhero name of her favorite superhero. “Captain Marvel represents an ideal that Kamala pines for,” Wilson told the New York Times. “She’s strong, beautiful and doesn’t have any of the baggage of being Pakistani and ‘different.’ ”

Sana Amanat, a Muslim-American herself and one of the two Marvel editors (along with Steve Wacker) who came up with the loose idea of Kamala and pushed for her inclusion in the Marvel Universe, added “It’s also sort of like when I was a little girl and wanted to be Tiffani-Amber Thiessen,” from “Saved by the Bell.”

Wilson says, “It was really important for me to portray Kamala as someone who is struggling with her faith,” and that the series will deal directly with how “familial and religious edicts mesh with super-heroics.”

More from the Times:

Kamala will face struggles outside her own head, including conflicts close to home. “Her brother is extremely conservative,” Ms. Amanat said. “Her mom is paranoid that she’s going to touch a boy and get pregnant. Her father wants her to concentrate on her studies and become a doctor.” Next to those challenges, fighting supervillains may be a welcome respite.

The fact that Kamala will be starting out in her own title shows the significant push that Marvel is willing to put behind her: historically sidekicks and other spinoff characters start out as secondary characters in a more famous character’s book, build some name recognition, and then eventually get their own series. This is also just plain cool because female superheroes with sidekicks? They are few and far between. There’s Wonder Woman and Donna Troy, Batwoman and Flamebird (Or Bat-Girl, if you want to get old school), and you’d be hard pressed to name any more, primarily because so many female superheroes are either sidekicks, spinoff characters, or members of a team. Women who mentor or are mentored by women are thin on the ground in popular fiction, and I look forward to seeing some juicy interactions with Carol’s realization that some kid thinks she’s so cool that she’ll put her life on the line for other people.

Superhero stories are often about people who bridge two worlds, due to the trope of a “secret identity,” but Kamala’s character, as described, gives Wilson a great opportunity to tackle the “two worlds” tropes from a different angle, with a character’s struggle to sort out the difference between the expectations she genuinely has for herself, whatever they may be, and the expectations she has adopted because they’ve been laid upon her by outside forces. I’m just as interested in seeing that conflict play out as I am in seeing Kamala kick some superbaddie butt.

(via The New York Times.)

TAGS: | | | |


  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    Poor Dust. It’s almost as if Marvel doesn’t think she exists any more.

  • https://twitter.com/adamhowardcross Adam Cross

    :( and she’s awesome, too

  • https://twitter.com/adamhowardcross Adam Cross

    ” “Her brother is extremely conservative,” Ms. Amanat said. “Her mom is paranoid that she’s going to touch a boy and get pregnant. Her father wants her to concentrate on her studies and become a doctor.” ” … nice that we’re avoiding stereotypes.. oh wait.

  • BaldBombshell

    To be fair, it’s not like they’re claiming Ms. Marvel is the first muslim hero (Excalibur & Josiah X precede her as well.)

  • Anonymous

    I know, right? Ugh, Marvel wastes all of its promising characters. I love Dust. I’m thrilled that now there’s more than just her in canon, but actually using Dust in some way that wasn’t background dressing would be, you know, awesome.

  • Anonymous

    For what it’s worth, THIS Pakistani-American has seen a good amount of both of those attitudes within the desi community. I wouldn’t be surprised if Ms. Amanat was drawing upon those based on her experiences or those of folks she knows.

    (Also this might be the first comic I actually subscribe to. Does one still subscribe to comics? I DO NOT KNOW HOW THIS WORKS.)

  • Anonymous

    Well, Comixology now offers digital subscriptions, and if you want to go with physical copies, it should be simple as walking into your local comic shop and asking to set up a pull list!

  • http://runt.org/ Adrian

    It’s not like there isn’t room for more than one female Muslim superhero in Marvel; increased representation could result in Dust getting more attention!

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    It was more a comment on how Marvel just keep adding more and more and more characters rather than using ones they already have and have put time and effort into establishing. It’s not “ugh another female muslim”, it’s “ugh even more characters in an already morbidly obese roster”

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    You’d think she is by the way it’s being reported in some places, but that’s not really the point. It’s more… Do we really, really need the roster to expand *even more*? Dust is fine, they just need to – ahem – dust her off and pull her out from the background of Wolverine & the X-Men. And Mercury along with her…

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    And a number of online stores (including Things From Another World, maybe?) offer mail-order subscriptions.

  • http://runt.org/ Adrian

    There’s a delicate balance between perpetuating stereotypes and recognizing cultural experience. As we continue to see more Muslim characters (for instance), we should also begin to see Muslim perspectives other than the conservative struggle. If we don’t, then it’s a problem… but if we do, then, awesome!

  • Gerald Kirby

    Wow, Marvel is actually working to win me back! I an genuinely looking forward to this comic!

  • https://twitter.com/adamhowardcross Adam Cross

    well obviously these attitudes are prevalent within various religious communities (my girlfriend’s mother is no different to Kamala’s, although from a Mauritian Hindu background, certain viewpoints remain the same) but that doesn’t mean it’s the automatic go-to for back story. I just think it’s lazy. I have friends whose families are the complete opposite, it would be nice to see some balance in the representation of characters who have a religious affiliations, some positivity would be a fresh change.

  • http://runt.org/ Adrian

    Kelly Sue pointed out that if we’re happy, we should ensure our voices are heard:

    Are you excited about the new Ms. Marvel? Telling Tumblr is great. Telling your retailer is even better. You know what else you can do? TELL MARVEL by writing to them directly — even just to say you like the direction they’re going.

    (Here’s the thing: folks who are not happy about this will are far more likely to pick up a pen, so… get to it.)

    http://kellysue.tumblr.com/post/66113612761/let-your-voice-be-heard

  • Anonymous

    I think the thing is though, if it hasn’t happened for Dust already, chances are it won’t. They’re making a big push for this new kids so I don’t see why they shouldn’t try just because some other writer is not using Dust or Excalibur.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, I think we do. I don’t think we can ever have too many characters for underrepresented groups.

  • Anonymous

    G. Willow Wilson? As in the author of Alif The Unseen?

    Sold. Nothing else necessary. Alif the Unseen was one of the best books I’ve read this year.

  • Anonymous

    I’m very happy to see that they announced this in a major publication like the NY Times, and not a comic site. There are people who otherwise wouldn’t know or care about such a thing that might look this up now because of the press coverage, as with Batwoman and the Miles Morales Spider-Man before. I think if they want her to succeed they’ve got to push her outside the current, insular market.

  • Thomas Hayes

    The new Ms. Marvel isn’t an X-Man, so why not?

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    But that’s the thing. Marvel make a push of “new kids” every five-ten years, and they just bury a whole cast of great characters with only a few really surviving. The Runaways got relegated to a cameo team, X-23 got cut out of the teen books and got given more adult stuff for a while, Surge and a few others carried on, but you had these great characters like Mercury, Blindfold and Dust who just kinda got buried.

    It’s also a case of “Ms. Marvel”? Really? Talk about confusing the branding EVEN MORE. Let that label go. Give her a better name. Having Captain Marvel and Ms. Marvel on the same shelf will just be confusing.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t really buy the confusing line. Comic fans already accept half a dozen variations along the lines of Batwhatever.

  • Anonymous

    And again, that’s just silly. It’s not Willow’s fault nobody is using Dust or any of those other kids. And repeatedly saying “Should’ve used Dust” just acts as though they’re interchangeable because they’re both muslims. It acts as though that’s their whole character when from this brief article alone it already sounds like Kamala is going to be a very different person from Soorya.

  • Anonymous

    And again, that’s just silly. It’s not Willow’s fault nobody is using Dust or any of those other kids. And repeatedly saying “Should’ve used Dust” just acts as though they’re interchangeable because they’re both muslims. It acts as though that’s their whole character when from this brief article alone it already sounds like Kamala is going to be a very different person from Soorya.

  • Jon E. Christianson

    Avoiding stereotypes shouldn’t be the goal, it’s not treating someone as a one-dimensional stereotype.

    Many people pitched a hissy-fit when Bunker, gay Teen Titan, was made out to be effeminate. But, stereotypical or not, there are effeminate gay men out there who would love a hero that they can see themselves in (I count myself in that group).

    Bunker, “stereotypically” effeminate as he may be, is also incredibly kind, loyal, hard-working, and secure in himself. He’s a hero first. And he’s three-dimensional. And people, whether they adhere to a stereotype or not, deserve to see themselves too.

  • Jon E. Christianson

    Avoiding stereotypes shouldn’t be the goal, it’s not treating someone as a one-dimensional stereotype.

    Many people pitched a hissy-fit when Bunker, gay Teen Titan, was made out to be effeminate. But, stereotypical or not, there are effeminate gay men out there who would love a hero that they can see themselves in (I count myself in that group).

    Bunker, “stereotypically” effeminate as he may be, is also incredibly kind, loyal, hard-working, and secure in himself. He’s a hero first. And he’s three-dimensional. And people, whether they adhere to a stereotype or not, deserve to see themselves too.

  • Anonymous

    Agreed. If they stray too much from the typical cultural experience they risk irrelevancy and making the writing lose a measure of authenticity.

  • Anonymous

    Agreed. If they stray too much from the typical cultural experience they risk irrelevancy and making the writing lose a measure of authenticity.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    Have I said it’s anyone’s fault?

    And no, I’ve not implied any of that (or acted that way). I’m objecting to the Marvel roster being expanded upon yet again. I’m supportive of the concept, but not the execution. Marvel have a great (and large) roster of characters they can use without needing to create more, because it just buries even more.

    I don’t think Dust and the new Ms. Marvel are interchangeable. In fact, I don’t think I’ve stated that Dust should BE Ms. Marvel… Actually, no, I haven’t.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    Have I said it’s anyone’s fault?

    And no, I’ve not implied any of that (or acted that way). I’m objecting to the Marvel roster being expanded upon yet again. I’m supportive of the concept, but not the execution. Marvel have a great (and large) roster of characters they can use without needing to create more, because it just buries even more.

    I don’t think Dust and the new Ms. Marvel are interchangeable. In fact, I don’t think I’ve stated that Dust should BE Ms. Marvel… Actually, no, I haven’t.

  • Thomas Hayes

    You mean Scott Lobdell did something right? I’m genuinely shocked by that. In my experience with him he’s an atrocious writer. Particularly annoying is that he mischaracterises a lot of characters – most annoyingly Supergirl, every time he writes dialogue for her.

  • Anonymous

    If you’re getting actual paper issues, go to your FLCBS (Friendly, local comic book store) and ask how their pull lists work. Most shops will reserve issues aside for you with a name and contact info. Some may have policies where you need to pick up by a certain date or the issues go back on the shelf. Good luck!

  • Emily

    Okay Captain Marvel is already my favourite superhero and seeing her with a sidekick sounds awesome!
    And making it a young muslim girl sounds even better to me!

    It sounds like they have the right kind of people on the writing and editing of this book and I hope that they really delve into the reality and depth of Kamala’s family. It would be a shame to see such and interesting story to fall on stereotypes.
    It would also be nice to see Kamala with friends from a less conservative muslim family for variety. It would be a good way to represent the spectrum of islam that way.

  • Anonymous

    no, you just said “Poor Dust” and then followed up by saying you wish marvel would stop creating new characters, specifically in reference to the new Muslim heroine they’ve announced. It comes across as “Why create a new muslim instead of using this one in limbo!”

  • Jon E. Christianson

    The series is absolutely terrible and I only stuck with it as long as did because of Bunker.

    I suspect his strong characterization of Bunker (named Miguel Barragan) has a lot to do with the fact that he’s based on his real life friend, Miguel Barragan.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    Well, yes. I find it hard to explain my positions on most things, but simply put I don’t think bringing back Ms. Marvel is a good idea, nor is expanding the roster even further. Would you not agree that it’s up to Marvel and the creators of this title to challenge me on that?

    I miss characters like Dust, Mercury, etc. I don’t see why we need yet more characters who are vaguely similar or utterly preposterous (read: most of the main cast of Wolverine & the X-Men, and it is NOT a comment on its quality) when there is a roster of characters who are perfectly serviceable.

    Marvel need to trim the fat, they don’t need to add to it. But again, it’s up to Marvel and those working on this title to challenge that.

    I also don’t think giving her a title straight of the door is going to work particularly well, either.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry, no. I’m never gonna be against more diversity. I’m never going to be against kids getting to see heroes and heroines who look like them instead of white hero/heroine #3000. I’m just not, certainly not from a high profile launch like this in a mainstream outlet.

    And certainly not from the specious reasoning that “Well there’s already muslims they could be using” as though her being a WOC or a Muslim is the only relevant part of her character. Again, the assertion that they could have just brought back Dust does just that, and ignores that maybe *GASP* Wilson and Marvel wanted to try a different character with different experiences. A kid from Jersey is going to have a vastly different worldview from a kid who grew up over in Afghanistan.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    1. I’m intensely pro-diversity. I’ve never once argued the point that this character should not exist because she’s Muslim or anything. I’ve argued that she’s just going to be another piece in the ridiculous Jenga tower that is Marvel’s roster. They already HAVE a diverse set of characters, but they’re not using them. I seriously believe this character will just go the same way.
    2. I agree representation is important. I’d die for more trans* characters in comics, because that emotional bond is important.
    3. You raise valid points about different experiences, etc. And I agree with the reasoning there, and I’m not disputing that. What I *am* disputing is that Marvel’s just increasing the roster, and not in any meaningful way beyond adding a young Muslim. Ms. Marvel? Yawn. Over-used X-Men power & ‘story’? Yawn. Just what we need, ANOTHER shapeshifter.

    But hey, I’ll happily admit I might be wrong. This might be the next best title on the stands. I’ll certainly give it a try. But my concerns are not based on this character (as such), they’re based on whether increasing the roster (and no doubt Marvel are already hoping they can get events out of this) is an entirely wise move, and whether this character will stay or be short-lived. Not even X-23 managed much beyond 20 issues, and that was with Marjorie Liu at the helm with Phil Noto on about a third of the issues.

  • Cy

    Once again Marvel leaves DC in the dust on important issues. I recently read through several (thirty actually) years of Spider-Man comics. It was interesting to see what the culture of the time was as portrayed by comics. This is an important series in the way it will bring that same insight into Kamala’s life and culture through her eyes.

  • Anonymous

    I really like G. Willow Wilson’s work though I haven’t read Alif the Unseen (too many books and too little time) but I did read a mini she did for Marvel a few years ago called Mystic. I rather liked it though I feel that I was the only one who did. She also did a Vixen mini for DC that was also pretty good. At least the first two issues that I read were.

  • Thomas Hayes

    I see, that makes sense. I’m in a very bad mood with Lobdell at the moment. Not only is his Superman a total douche, but he clearly doesn’t understand Supergirl. I don’t know what his problem is but you get the impression he’s never even *looked* at her own book. Either that or he doesn’t understand how to write teenagers/women/teenage women. Probably all of the above bearing in mind you’re far from the first person to tell me Teen Titans is terrible.

  • Anonymous

    That porcupine has Hulk hands.

  • Thomas Hayes

    And that is why it is the envy of all its porcupine friends.

  • Anonymous

    And again, I disagree with that assertion. I’m already seeing people showing interest over her and the Ms. Marvel title. You say “yawn” but I’m seeing people who ARE interested in a Muslim Ms. Marvel just like people were interested in a lesbian Batwoman or a black Spider-Man.

  • SCP3

    Hearing that she’s a Muslim makes me wonder, how many superheroes are there that we overtly know their religious affiliations? I know Nightcrawler is Catholic, and I would assume Wonder Woman is a lapsed pagan (what with being a daughter of Zeus but being in a very dysfunctional family), but I honestly can’t think of anyone beyond that.

    Well, Thor, who’s obviously a Methodist.

    When I think about it more, are there any atheist superheroes?

  • Centipede Damascus

    http://www.adherents.com/lit/comics/comic_book_religion.html

    Confirmed atheist superheroes include Mr. Fantastic (Reed Richards), Ant-Man (Hank Pym), and Mr. Terrific (Michael Holt).

  • SCP3

    Okay, I really have to wonder about atheists in worlds where gods and devils show up on a regular basis, and Hell, at least, is a well-established place people visit on a semi-regular basis.

  • LizbethAnne

    Just because there’s one female Muslim hero, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t get more. If we kept by that rule, Dust (who originally appeared in 2002) would never have been created, since M (Monet St. Croix) appeared first, back in the 90′s.
    I mean, I agree with your comments that Marvel should probably slow down on creating new characters willy-nilly, since they have so many great characters in limbo. But I can’t object when the new character is the type of person we see so rarely in mainstream comics. If it was another Wolverine book? Yeah, I’d complain. But this might be worth adding another character to Marvel’s list.

  • Michael Singer

    I LOVE this idea, everything about this idea. I also know NOTHING about this writer, so for once I’ll be surprised, which is refreshing. The art looks really good. The ONLY thing that I am not looking forward to is the inevitable cries of “Marvel is being PC” or “Marvel is only doing this for the publicity” that will arise in some circles. Also, Dust is one of my favorite X-Men characters.

  • Michael Singer

    Isn’t Faiza Hussein also a Muslim superhero?

  • Michael Singer

    Magneto and Kitty Pryde are both Jewish. The Helena Bertinelli version of Huntress was a rather devout Catholic. Batwoman is Jewish. Faiza Hussein is Muslim (I think). And there are others. Wonder Woman worships the Greek Gods of course. As for Atheist superheroes, Tony Stark is another one.

  • Gary Keyes

    Well done, Marvel! Leave DC in the dust as irrelevant!

  • http://www.facebook.com/nuuni.nuunani Nuuni Nuunani

    huh, so marvel is finally catching up to DC in the whole ‘lets give female characters their own series’ thing. About time

  • Nick Gaston

    Actually, I think it’d be more interesting if Ms. Marvel and Dust turned out to be RIVALS.

  • Abel Undercity

    OK, this sounds promising.

    That said, I must know the story behind the giant hedgehog with the Hulk Hands.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    And I never said I wasn’t interested in a Muslim Ms. Marvel, either.

    But hey. We can talk about this all day. Marvel aren’t committed to diversity. If they were, then they wouldn’t backbench their diverse characters, they wouldn’t put Greg Land on Mighty Avengers (a title with a multi-racial team) and so on. But they do, so I don’t really hold out much hope that this new Ms. Marvel will last particularly long.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    But it’s all well and good creating new, diverse characters, but look at their history with characters of this (or most diverse) types. Limelight for a few years, boom, backbench. This Ms. Marvel isn’t going to last.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    That could be fun, admittedly.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    Dust is Muslim. Can’t think of any others off the top of my head.

  • Anonymous

    my Aunty Morgan got a nearly
    new red Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG GT Coupe by work using a laptop. Read Full Report
    J­a­m­2­0­.­ℂ­o­m

  • http://www.facebook.com/nuuni.nuunani Nuuni Nuunani

    Agreed. People make a big deal about the new captain Marvel as if a female captain is a new thing when in reality the original has been shelfed for years and nobody does anything with the poor character

  • Arakiba

    If her brother’s extremely conservative, he might be inclined to murder her in an honor killing.

  • Anonymous

    Disagree but whatever.

  • Robert Vary

    I’ve heard it explained thus: If you are an unpowered human in the comics universe like, say, Batman, and you regularly work or fight with people who can fly, move mountains, read minds, control minds, control the elements, change their shape, alter reality, travel through time, move at (or near) the speed of light, destroy entire planets, and yet explicitly are NOT gods, then what criteria can you use to determine “Oh yes, THIS powerful being is super-legit and deserves my worship”? I mean, Thor is definitely a god, as in a super-powerful being who controls lightning and that people worshiped at one time, but then again Storm meets all those criteria as well. Is it immortality then? You sure as hell are not going to worship Vandal Savage. Speaking of Hell, sure it exists and is bad, but you’ve gone to Apokolips and it’s even worse.

    How would you tell the difference between all the incredibly powerful beings around you and an actual god? Maybe that one’s not actually divine, as it claims, and simply comes from another dimension. Oh, you created the universe? And you’re the ultimate source of all evil? Yeah, you’ve heard that one before, and you defeated that one, too.

    I guess it comes down to your definition of “god.” If the main difference between a god and a run-of-the-mill super-powered being is that the former managed to con people — or even civilizations — into worshiping them, then why should you care? If Superman could beat Thor in a fight (which I’m sure people would argue, but at the very least no one could disagree that Supes would give him a good run for his money), then why isn’t HE a god too? Maybe it’s just easier to think “Tons of super-powered beings, but none of them are really gods.”

  • Robert Vary

    I’ve heard it explained thus: If you are an unpowered human in the comics universe like, say, Batman, and you regularly work or fight with people who can fly, move mountains, read minds, control minds, control the elements, change their shape, alter reality, travel through time, move at (or near) the speed of light, destroy entire planets, and yet explicitly are NOT gods, then what criteria can you use to determine “Oh yes, THIS powerful being is super-legit and deserves my worship”? I mean, Thor is definitely a god, as in a super-powerful being who controls lightning and that people worshiped at one time, but then again Storm meets all those criteria as well. Is it immortality then? You sure as hell are not going to worship Vandal Savage. Speaking of Hell, sure it exists and is bad, but you’ve gone to Apokolips and it’s even worse.

    How would you tell the difference between all the incredibly powerful beings around you and an actual god? Maybe that one’s not actually divine, as it claims, and simply comes from another dimension. Oh, you created the universe? And you’re the ultimate source of all evil? Yeah, you’ve heard that one before, and you defeated that one, too.

    I guess it comes down to your definition of “god.” If the main difference between a god and a run-of-the-mill super-powered being is that the former managed to con people — or even civilizations — into worshiping them, then why should you care? If Superman could beat Thor in a fight (which I’m sure people would argue, but at the very least no one could disagree that Supes would give him a good run for his money), then why isn’t HE a god too? Maybe it’s just easier to think “Tons of super-powered beings, but none of them are really gods.”

  • Laura Truxillo

    Also, Booster Gold. Ted, by conjuncture, has…some…religion, but it’s unnamed (my guess with a last name like Kord is Jewish or Lutheran).

  • Laura Truxillo

    “he doesn’t understand how to write teenagers/women/teenage women.”

    He used to, though. That’s the weird thing. Generation X was one of the first comics I got on a semi-regular basis as a kid.

  • Laura Truxillo

    That actually sounds like a pretty good idea. The artist flatbear, on tumblr, is a pretty good primer for the whole “New to comics WAT DO” thing–she works in a comic shop and is great at explaining things to newbies because she loves them so.

  • LifeLessons

    LOVE IT!!!!

  • http://zacshipley.com/ Zac Shipley

    You know thats confusing? 5 monthly Batman books. Which one do I buy if I like Batman? All? do these stories go together? Never mind, I’ll read Spider-Man. Which Spider-Man book do I buy? in this one he’s mind controlled by Doc Ock, and in this one he’s a completely different kid… where is the Peter Parker spiderman comic?

    At least these two books will have noticeably different looking characters on the cover and different titles. Brand confusion is the order of the day for the major characters I think.

  • Thomas Hayes

    He wasn’t pushing 50 back then, though. I don’t know what exactly it is, maybe he can only write moody, obnoxious teens or something because he writes Supergirl as a callous, unlikeable, slightly air-headed brat. She is none of those things in her own book and never has been in the entirety of the New 52 incarnation of the character. In some cases he’s writing her the exact opposite of the way she’s supposed to be.

  • Cowtools

    Mystic was indeed awesome, and died too soon

  • Cowtools

    On the contrary, putting Land on Mighty Avengers was a sign of commitment on Marvel’s part because – baffling as it may seem to discerning readers – Greg Land’s art seems to sell books.

  • Kathryn (@Loerwyn)

    It might be a commitment for it to sell, but it’s not really a commitment to diversity as such, because it’s pretty common knowledge (and verifiable) that Land white-washes and draws women in, essentially, pornographical poses (mostly because they’re from swimsuit magazines, etc.)

  • Anonymous

    I remember from when my kids were little, & I got them a “Shalom Sesame” video. The hedgehog is a symbol of the Israeli people. SERIOUSLY. SO, yeah, I totally want to know what’s up w/the hedgehog!

  • LizbethAnne

    Interesting–I had read Generation X, and didn’t recall them doing much with her faith, but when it became somewhat of a plot point in X-Factor, I assumed I either hadn’t noticed or had glossed over it as a middle schooler.
    (This might sound dumb, but I have a lot of Jewish and Caholic friends who consider themselves both athiests and culturally part of their family’s religion. I have no idea if this is also a ‘thing’ in the Muslim community, though.)

  • LizbethAnne

    Yeah, I don’t really disagree with you or what you’re saying. I hate how Marvel treats its B-list heroes. The fact that the book set at the Jean Grey School is 80% Logan and his issues is infuriating when there are dozens of kid characters we could follow who aren’t also appearing in every other Marvel book. I went on a 20-minute rant when I heard about Avengers Arena–Marvel creates characters I like a lot (Runaways and Avengers Academy) only to kill them off? I mean, it isn’t like Avengers Academy was hugely popular, but the kids all had a lot of potential. But in Marvel, dead means dead unless you were created pre-90s, so I worry.
    I’m kind of a hypocrite, though, since I encourage this behavior by buying Amazing X-Men, where they’re bringing back Nightcrawler.

  • Fatima Monkush

    As a Muslim girl of south asian descent growing up in the tri-state area reading comic books I cannot wait for this title to launch! Yes, Dust already exists, but I always felt like her character was a forced inclusion. I do want to be catered to as a consumer, but I don’t want to be pandered to. I am really looking forward to the new Ms Marvel and I have no doubt Willow Wilson will rock it!

  • Abel Undercity

    Or porcupine? Someone else said it was a porcupine. Either way, we must speak of reasons.

  • frumpus

    that would be a great storyline. he’ll try to murder her, but she’ll kill him in self defense!