Uber Attempts to Give Its Reputation a Lift With a UN Partnership to Hire 1 Million Female Drivers

So will the partnership be like Uber, but for jobs?

Recommended Videos

Ride-sharing giant Uber hasn’t had the greatest track record with women, so they’re finally doing something to try to turn it around—in PR terms, at the very least. They’ve partnered with the United Nations to hire 1 million female drivers by 2020.

Outreach for better employment equality is always good in general and even better in this case, considering that only 14% of Uber’s 160,000 drivers in the United States are women. The partnership with UN Women, a UN organization that works towards global gender equality, was announced on Tuesday with a joint statement in which Uber CEO Travis Kalanick and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, UN Women Executive Director, said that a cornerstone of gender equality is making sure all women have, “direct access to safe and equitable earning opportunities.”

But however great an opportunity it may be for the women who become drivers under the initiative, it’s hardly a solution to any of the problems with Uber, its customer security, and how it relates to women. There have been many reports of harassment by Uber drivers, and a reported rape by an Uber driver in India led to a temporary ban on the service in New Delhi and the addition of a “panic button” in the app.

“If women are being raped, throwing jobs at them won’t stop the problem,” an Uber user told the Daily Beast. “They need to make fundamental changes to their policies and who they allow to drive for them.”

A higher proportion of female drivers might cut down on the likelihood of these incidents, sure, but it won’t address the root of the problem—not strict enough background checks, not enough customer information security—to effectively stop them from happening.

(via Mashable, image via Adam Fagen)

Are you following The Mary Sue on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, & Google +?


The Mary Sue is supported by our audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Learn more
related content
Read Article ‘Mamma Mia!’ Star Sara Poyzer Says a BBC Production Replaced Her With AI
Sara Poyzer performs at the Magic at the Musicals event in 2019
Read Article In Moment of Unbelievable Irony, Midjourney Accuses Stability AI of Image Theft
Spider-Man pointing at another Spider-Man, who is pointing back.
Read Article Elon Musk May Be the Lesser of Two Evils in This Legal Battle With OpenAI
Elon Musk at the 2022 Met Gala
Read Article A.I. Scammers Are Impersonating Real Authors to Sell Fake Books
A robotic hand holds a pencil.
Read Article Sexist Trolls Drive Away Twitch’s Top Female Streamer After 10 Years
Imane "Pokimane" Anys at the 2023 Green Carpet Fashion Awards
Related Content
Read Article ‘Mamma Mia!’ Star Sara Poyzer Says a BBC Production Replaced Her With AI
Sara Poyzer performs at the Magic at the Musicals event in 2019
Read Article In Moment of Unbelievable Irony, Midjourney Accuses Stability AI of Image Theft
Spider-Man pointing at another Spider-Man, who is pointing back.
Read Article Elon Musk May Be the Lesser of Two Evils in This Legal Battle With OpenAI
Elon Musk at the 2022 Met Gala
Read Article A.I. Scammers Are Impersonating Real Authors to Sell Fake Books
A robotic hand holds a pencil.
Read Article Sexist Trolls Drive Away Twitch’s Top Female Streamer After 10 Years
Imane "Pokimane" Anys at the 2023 Green Carpet Fashion Awards
Author
Dan Van Winkle
Dan Van Winkle (he) is an editor and manager who has been working in digital media since 2013, first at now-defunct <em>Geekosystem</em> (RIP), and then at <em>The Mary Sue</em> starting in 2014, specializing in gaming, science, and technology. Outside of his professional experience, he has been active in video game modding and development as a hobby for many years. He lives in North Carolina with Lisa Brown (his wife) and Liz Lemon (their dog), both of whom are the best, and you will regret challenging him at <em>Smash Bros.</em>