Ted Lasso (Jason Sudeikis) in a chair on Ted Lasso

Can’t Believe ‘Ted Lasso’ Actually Made Me Love This Dynamic

Apple TV+’s Ted Lasso has always been a show about striving to be the best version of yourself possible. But when you have stubborn footballers who maybe don’t want to change, it can feel like those characters are just always going to be the same. But then the show tricks you and suddenly you’re falling in love with the budding relationship between Jamie Tartt (Phil Dunster) and Roy Kent (Brett Goldstein). Former enemies to now besties, Jamie and Roy were at odds over Keeley Jones (Juno Temple) for most of the first half of the series.

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But then something shifted in the water of season 3 and we’ve seen as both Roy and Jamie have grown closer and confided in each other, even if it is more Roy taking out his frustrations on Jamie, who is willingly part of this torture plan to train. Both of these men went from stubborn manbabies at times (even if Roy would hate that description, it can be true) to people struggling with their own feelings and leaning on each other to understand them.

And I feel tricked! When Jamie Tartt appeared in season 1, I was not a fan, and I don’t think that statement is a wild one. But as the show went on and we learned more about Jamie’s history and life, the more I started to feel for him. Then this relationship with Roy came into play, and man did “Sunflowers” really just cement my love for them both—must come with the episode title, as those are my favorite flowers.

But in exploring Roy and Jamie as enemies to friends (or lovers, in some circles of the fanbase), the series gave us two unmovable men leaning on each other to grow as people. And by god do I love it.

Enemies to lovers?

Roy Kent and Jamie Tartt on a bus in Ted Lasso
(Apple TV+)

In season 1, Jamie Tartt was a … well, prick—and he’d call himself that now, as well. He was mean, he mocked Roy, and he was a horrible boyfriend to Keeley, and to be fair, he wasn’t a good teammate, either. He would’ve rather been the star than a team player, which just didn’t work with Ted and what he was trying to do. That made Roy and Jamie, who were teammates at the time, enemies.

In season 2, it was a bit more about Jamie trying to redeem himself and Roy figuring out where he belongs in the world after his football career. The two still had their tension because Roy was dating Keeley and Jamie clearly still loved her, but they were less about fighting and more just people who were not going to be friends.

Which then brings us to season 3, where these two are two peas in a pod and now I have questions. Would I like it if they smooched? Probably! But Ted Lasso really did trick us into watching these two go from enemies to friends throughout the run of the series in a way that feels warranted, and that’s the beauty of the series. They could have easily continued this hatred they had for each other and let that tension lead the team, but instead, these two are working together to be better men, and it’s just refreshing to see. But damn you Ted Lasso for making me love them.

(featured image: Apple TV+)


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Rachel Leishman
Rachel Leishman (She/Her) is an Assistant Editor at the Mary Sue. She's been a writer professionally since 2016 but was always obsessed with movies and television and writing about them growing up. A lover of Spider-Man and Wanda Maximoff's biggest defender, she has interests in all things nerdy and a cat named Benjamin Wyatt the cat. If you want to talk classic rock music or all things Harrison Ford, she's your girl but her interests span far and wide. Yes, she knows she looks like Florence Pugh. She has multiple podcasts, normally has opinions on any bit of pop culture, and can tell you can actors entire filmography off the top of her head. Her work at the Mary Sue often includes Star Wars, Marvel, DC, movie reviews, and interviews.