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Find Out What’s in Store in J.K. Rowling’s Future North American Wizarding Installments

Professor Binns would be proud.

Magic_in_North_America_Teaser_Kitchi_Day_2

Today, the first in a series of new writing by J.K. Rowling herself has gone up on Pottermore, and it details some information on Wizarding in North America as we prepare for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and its American setting. The other installments will follow later this week, but we can prepare like good little students with some synopses.

Today’s installment, “Fourteenth Century – Seventeenth Century,” covers Native American magic with Animagi and wandless magic and also explains just how much the different magical communities knew about each other back then. The next three chapters will arrive at 9am ET for the next three days, and Entertainment Weekly published their titles and synopses:

“Seventeenth Century and Beyond”
March 9
Being a witch or wizard in North America is even more dangerous than in Europe. This account, which includes the real histories of the Salem witch trials and the Scourers (a rogue band of magical mercenaries), explains why.

“Rappaport’s Law”
March 10
In the 18th century, the laws governing secrecy for the wizarding community became even stricter after a major violation that resulted in humiliation for the Magical Congress of the United States of America, the U.S. version of the Ministry of Magic.

“1920s Wizarding America”
March 11
Ollivanders might have a corner on the wand market across the pond, but the American makers of the finest wizarding implements were Wolfe, Jonker, Quintana, and Beauvais. This is their story.

For all you Hermiones out there, now you know what to expect in your studies over the next few days. Harrys and Rons: congratulations! These snyopses are probably the most history you’ve ever read. You may go play Quidditch now.

… I hope Rowling explains why the Wizarding community was so cool with Muggles getting burned at the stake for supposedly using magic in the Salem witch trials.

(image via Pottermore)

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