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women in science

  1. High School Freshman’s Heartwarming Essay On The Importance Of Hermione

    10 points to...I'm not crying, you're crying!

    The Mary Sue has been covering a lot of feel-good Harry Potter and J.K. Rowling news recently, and I was starting to wonder if maybe the series was formative on so many of our readers and editorial team simply because we can remember a time before Harry.

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  2. Women at Code Camp Discuss How to Fix the Problem of the Male-Dominated Tech Field

    Spoiler: Society has to stop dictating kids' interests by gender.

    Why are programs like Code Camp so important to fixing the tech field's problem with being overwhelmingly male-dominated? While Code Camp helps strengthen the community of women in tech, attendees think that something needs to be done about the gender divide at an earlier age.

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  3. 8 Real Life Girl Geniuses You Ought to Know

    No, not Ami Mizuno!

    It’s time to call these girls by name, and give them the respect they deserve. Write these down, tell your friends about them, and – better yet – tell the kids in your life about them, too. Give them someone (several someones!) to look up to, and give their science teachers a break from having to explain why learning chemistry, biology, and physics might be a handy thing to do.

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  4. 11-Year-Old Girl Who Battled Cancer Wins Coveted Inventor Award For IV Backpack She Designed For Friends

    At eight years old Kylie Simonds was diagonsed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the connective tissues. Now eleven, Kylie has been cancer-free for two years, but she still remembers the struggles of chemo and has friends fighting the disease. To make the lives of children in treatment a little easier, Kylie has designed an IV backpack for pediatric oncology units that has been winning awards at conventions as well as acclaim in the medical community.

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  5. Sixth Grade Girl’s Viral Science Fair Project May Have Plagiarized Previous Research

    I knew that baking soda volcano was too good to be true!

    Today in "tricky but nonetheless important news," the media might have been a little hasty in lauding the discoveries of sixth-grader Lauren Arrington. The 12-year-old's science fair project went viral for its discovery that invasive lionfish are capable of traveling into estuaries, but an adult biologist is reluctantly coming forward to say that information isn't new--in fact, he discovered it himself four years ago.

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  6. Things We Saw Today: I Chews You, Pikachu Burger!

    Pikachu burger uses Bun-der Shock! It's super effective!

    As delicious as it looks, I kinda feel like I wouldn't be able to eat this burger from the pop-up Pikachu café in Tokyo. Instead I'd probably just let it follow me around while I eat food shaped like other Pokémon.

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  7. Our Friend Bill Nye Did an AMA, Here Are Our Favorite Answers!

    And could we see a return of "The Science Guy" to television?

    Our Friend Bill Nye and some of his friends did a Reddit AMA today about searching for life on Jupiter's moon Europa. Nye's answered touched on some other excited subjects like the possibility of his return to television!

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  8. Stephanie Kwolek, Pioneering Chemist, Has Passed Away At 90

    Thank you, madame. You made the world a safer place.

    Fox News is reporting that Stephanie Kwolek, the chemist who invented the durable fiber used in Kevlar Body Armor, has passed away at 90 of an unknown illness.

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