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  1. Take a Behind-the-Scenes Look at One of Our Favorite Radio Shows and Podcasts, Bullseye With Jesse Thorn

    Remember, every Geekosystem post has a signature subheader.

    Bullseye With Jesse Thorn is arguably one of the best radio shows around, and it's an argument we've made a few times on this site. The show and its host Thorn seek to bring listeners the very best in pop culture, and this new video takes a behind-the-scenes look at how and why the show is made. Let's go.

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  2. Watch This Awesome Short Film About Evil Action Figures Getting Their Comeuppance

    This is like if Toy Story were really dark and really short, and also made you want to fight crime.

    Vimeo user Paul Constantakis has released a new short film, Villainous, and it's a must-see. More a suggestive glimpse into the secret lives of our crime-fighting heroes -- and their dastardly foes -- than a narrative story, the two-and-a-half-minutes nonetheless hints just enough at the epic battle that we have missed to whet our appetite for more.

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  3. Vimeo Gives Pro Users Options to Make You Pay Per View

    Do you like Vimeo more than YouTube? Well, it may be time to put your money where your mouth is, because Vimeo has beaten YouTube to the pay-per-view game, so you could soon find yourself paying for your favorite Vimeo videos. Like the YouTube plan announced a few weeks ago, this doesn't mean Vimeo is going to an entirely paid service. They're just giving their Pro users the option to charge, but unlike YouTube, I think Vimeo producers might actually take them up on it.

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  4. Stanley Kubrick Sure Enjoyed the One-Point Perspective [Video]

    Say what you want about Stanley Kubrick, but the man certainly had a certain visual style. Part of his obsessive visual panache was the consistent repetitive use of the one-point perspective. Essentially, the one-point perspective is a manner in which three-dimensional objects can be represented in an image by having intersecting vertical and horizontal lines radiating from a single point. Though you might not know it, you've seen this particular perspective over and over again in a myriad of ways. Over on Vimeo, user kogonada has spliced together a short video highlighting Kubrick's love for it.

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  5. Vimeo's Weird Terms of Service Prohibit Gameplay Videos Unless Users Pay $200 a Year

    It looks as if Vimeo is cracking down on gameplay videos, in what seems like an odd move for the service. In carving out a niche for itself in a world that is dominated by streaming giant YouTube, Vimeo has taken some interesting approaches to video hosting. You can't repost a video you found on the Internet or elsewhere, the rules regarding non-sexual nudity and nudity for artistic expression are more lax, and there is an increased focus on video ownership. Vimeo does not like gameplay videos, though.

    The Vimeo Upload Guidelines definitely do say that gameplay videos are not allowed, although game developers are allowed to post progress videos, and machinima is acceptable if there is sufficient story involved. While this apparently hasn't been a problem before, it looks like Vimeo is starting to crack down. However, there is a course of action for Vimeo users with gameplay videos who don't want to migrate to YouTube: Pony up for $200 for a year of Vimeo PRO. That's where things get a little weird.

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  6. The Profile of Video-Sharing Users in America [Infographic]

    As you sit in front of your computer late at night, watching calorie-free videos of funny cats or where women look when talking to a buff bro, do you suddenly get the feeling that you're the only one wasting away, spending precious life hours watching a man covered in peanut butter? If you're in America, you can check out this infographic about the video-sharing trends in your country, and then you can stop feeling so alone. Alternatively, if you're not in America, you can ingest the information in the infographic and make fun of us Americans for watching so much video content instead of reading books or, I don't know, watching soccer. Full infographic after the jump.

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  7. A Wrinkle in Time in 90 Seconds

    If you went to grade school (and had a slightly hippy-dippy teacher), you probably read A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle. The story, published in 1962, entails a bunch of misfits and the search for their missing scientist father through space and time. The following year, it won the Newbery Medal, the most prestigious honor in children's literature. And now, it's author James Kennedy's entry in the 90-Second Newbery Film Festival, which will feature 90-second video adaptations of Newbery award-winning books. Because according to Kennedy:

    It turns out that any book, no matter how worthy and somber, becomes pleasingly ludicrous when compressed into 90 seconds.
    If it's been on your "must re-read" list for a while, maybe this 90-second version will convince you to finally pick it up. I laughed, I cried, it was way better than Cliff's Notes. (BoingBoing)

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  8. Italy Says: YouTube is a TV Channel and Therefore Responsible for its Content

    Italian newspaper La Repubblica reports (in translation, original here) that the Italian Authority for Communications Guarantees has passed two resolutions on internet video and internet radio respectively, that classify YouTube, Vimeo and other sites whose content is entirely user generated as television stations. The reasoning is that if a site in any way curates their user generated content, even with automatic algorithms, "this amounts to editorial control," and the site should be held to the same rules that apply to Italy's broadcast television stations.  This would subject these sites to a small tax, would require them to take down videos within 48 hours of the request of anyone who feels they have been slandered, and to not broadcast videos unsuitable for children at certain times of day (whatever that would actually mean for a completely online service). Most importantly, however, the new resolutions would make YouTube and other sites legally responsible for all of their content.

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  9. A Winner of the 2010 Vimeo Awards: “oops”

    oops from Chris Beckman on Vimeo. Falling "somewhere between a visual mixtape and a postmodern virtual travelogue," Chris Beckman's experimental short film, called "oops," is composed solely of YouTube videos of people dropping their cameras. It's actually quite neat, interlacing each camera drop with the subsequent clip, in a way that is addictive and hypnotic.

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  10. Star Wars Uncut is Complete!

    Star Wars Uncut is a project embarked upon by one Casey Pugh, a developer from Vimeo who, like many people in this day and age, decided to use the internet to make something fun and new.

    So he split Star Wars: A New Hope into a few hundred 15-second clips, and allowed Vimeo users to claim a clip, re-film it in any way they liked (costumes, animation, LEGO stop motion, action figure stop motion, floating slices of pizza, anything), and submit it back to the site. The most popular clips would be compiled into the final film, which is now ready for viewing.

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