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University of Rochester Medical Center

  1. Dreams Dashed: Radiation From Space Travel May Cause Brain Damage

    If you're anything like me, you still haven't given up on that dream of being an astronaut one day, breaking the surly bonds of Earth and experiencing the wonder and vastness of space firsthand. That's why I bring you the following story with a heavy heart -- according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center, the list of dangers involved in space travel just got a little longer, with "alien attacks," "insane computer AIs," and "being sucked out of an airlock" joined by a new hazard to space flight -- an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease.

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  2. Your Neuroses Could Be Good For Your Health, If You’re Not A Jerk About Them

    A new study suggests that being neurotic could actually be good for your health -- just as long as you're also pleasant and responsible while you're indulging your eccentricities. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center found that people who were both neurotic and conscientious -- defined for this study as being "organized, responsible and hardworking" -- had unusually low levels of a protein associated with a host of chronic diseases including diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. In principle, this should give neurotics around the world one less reason to worry about their health, though in practice...we totally won't. Nice try, though!

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  3. You’re Doing It Wrong: Doctors Have Been Using Implantable Defibrillators On Wrong Setting for 20 Years

    A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that implantable defibrillators have been operating on the wrong settings for almost twenty years. According to a two year study of over 1,500 patients, the implantable devices, which monitor a patient's heart rate and deliver modest electrical shocks to correct it, could be saving more lives if they were set to deliver those shocks when patients reached a slightly higher heart rate.

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