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Sweden

  1. Swedish Nuclear Plants Host Surprise Activist Slumber Party, Intruders Avoid Detection for 28 Hours

    Nuclear plant security is one of those things that pretty much everyone agrees on. In essence, it's probably a bad idea to let just anyone wander around a nuclear facility without proper clearance. Just wanting security to be without faults doesn't make it that way, unfortunately. After around 70 Greenpeace activists swarmed two nuclear plants in Sweden, six managed to avoid security overnight by hiding out on rooftops. In fact, plant owner Vattenfall claimed that all the activists had been detained and their security measures had worked.

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  2. Swiss Cows to Send Texts When They’re in Heat, Probably Still Qualifies as Sexting

    There seems to be a trend going on where we'd rather our livestock electronically warn us of things rather than actually checking in on them. For example, sheep might soon warn their shepherds of attack via text. Not content to let sheep get all the cool gadgets, Swiss dairy cows are about to get in on the action too. Due to the fact that it can be difficult to discern when a cow is in heat, sensors attached should be able to take measurements and alert farmers by text so they know when to inseminate the critters.

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  3. Survey Tricks Folks Into Crafting Compelling Arguments Against Their Own Opinions

    If you've ever read comments on, say, a political website, it can appear that folks in general really aren't willing to see any viewpoint other than their own. They can almost seem incapable of fathoming how someone could hold an opinion opposite the one they have. As it turns out, people actually are a lot more flexible than that, and not in a yoga kind of way. Well, maybe also in a yoga kind of way, but not just. Researchers in Sweden managed to get people to support opinions opposite of the ones they originally held by tricking them into thinking they supported them in the first place.

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  4. First Web Index Declares Sweden Winners of The Internet

    the internet is serious business

    Sweden, you have earned the first "official" World Wide Web bragging rights. As reported by CNET Asia, the newly-crafted Web Index shows that Sweden is better than the rest of us at using the Internet. How is such a thing measured? The five-year survey of global web usage was conducted by Sir Tim Berners-Lee's World Wide Web Foundation, and uses a variety of factors to determine how the Internet is being used to impact growth and development in 61 countries. This includes tracking the number of users, strength of a nation's technological framework, and counting broadband connections, but also looking at the much more nebulous factors of "political impact" and distribution of information across networks. Secondary data was gathered from multi-lateral organizations such as the World Bank, the World Economic Forum, and yes, Wikipedia.

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  5. Sweden Grants $59 Million in Aid to Cambodia After They Agree to Deport Pirate Bay Founder

    Correlation is obviously not causation. That said, the suspicious series of events surrounding the arrest of Gottfrid Svartholm, one of the founders of popular torrent site The Pirate Bay, does give room to speculation. After his arrest, Sweden wanted to deport the man from Cambodia, but there's no standing extradition treaty between the two countries. The two apparently came to some kind of agreement, as Cambodia has since agreed to deport Svartholm. Fresh on the heels of this news, it's been announced that Sweden will provide a $59 million aid package to Cambodia for "causes of democratic development, human rights, education, and climate change for two years."

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  6. Pirate Bay Founder Gottfrid Svartholm Arrested in Cambodia

    Gottfrid Svartholm, the internet's pirate king, was arrested in Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia, on Thursday. Svartholm, better known by his handle, Anakata, is the founder of everyone's favorite torrent provider, The Pirate Bay. Mr. Svartholm, age 27, has "technically" been on the run since he was sentenced to one year in prison in Sweden for his involvement in creating The Pirate Bay. I say technically because Svartholm hasn't really been running; he simply refused to return to his ancestral homeland after receiving his sentence. Svartholm did not return to Sweden for his trial due to an illness that kept him bed-ridden in a hospital.

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  7. So, the Person Running @Sweden This Week Has Gone off the Rails

    In case any of you have forgotten, the official Twitter account for the nation of Sweden moves from person to person each week. This week, we've been treated to the musings of "Sonja," who posed the above question to the world. As you can imagine, it doesn't get much better.

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  8. Swedish Man Survived Being Trapped in Car For Months, Hibernated “Like a Bear”

    There's a pretty incredible story floating around the Internet today about a 45 year-old Swedish man who was rescued from his car after apparently being trapped inside without food for months. Some snowmobilers came across the vehicle buried in snow on a forest path, not far from the northern city of Umea. His rescuers were surprised to find someone inside, wrapped in a sleeping bag, and even more surprised when the man managed to gasp out that he'd been in the car since December 19th.

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  9. File-Sharing is Now an Official Religion in Sweden

    The Missionary Church of Kopimism, or in layman's terms, the Church of File-Sharing, was founded in 2010 by Isak Gerson, a philosophy student with a love of file-sharing that, well, bordered on religious. Now, after years of petitioning the Swedish government for official status, he finally got it. The idea was that through official religion, file-sharers might be able to find protection from persecution for their beliefs, which obviously include illegal file-sharing. But it wasn't just a bid for some kind of technical protection, as Gerson seems to take this whole religion thing kind of seriously.

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  10. Ring Lost Nearly Two Decades Ago Resurfaces on Carrot

    This is just one of those perfectly serendipidious stories you love to hear about. In 1995, a Swedish woman named Lena Påhlsson set her custom-made white gold wedding ring aside as she did the traditional Christmas baking. Amidst the hustle and bustle the tiny treasure vanished, and after years of searching she and her husband Ola accepted that the ring was likely lost forever. That is until this year, when Lena found a surprise in her vegetable garden.

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