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superbugs

  1. Spray For Cleaning Ship Hulls Could Relieve Your Really, Really Bad Sinusitis

    Do you suffer from sinusitis? Like, really bad sinusitis? Sinusitis that you would describe as "nightmarish" or... well, you get the point. No matter how badly your cavities are clogged, a team at Newcastle University may have hope for you yet. They're reporting in the journal PLOS ONE that a microbe-derived spray initially developed to clean the hulls of ships could be just the thing to break up the brick-like mucus found in folks suffering from chronic sinusitis.

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  2. Clap On, Clap…Uh-oh: Antibiotic Resistant Gonorrhea Makes Its North American Debut

    The last oral antibiotic that is effective in curing the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea may not be effective anymore. A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that the oral antibiotic cefixime was ineffective in treating the disease in 7% of cases where it was prescribed. For those of you who have been playing along at hom, watching gonorrhea get scarier and scarier, you can move your "STD Doomsday Clock" one minute closer to midnight, as pretty soon, the only viable medical treatment for gonorrhea will be "getting set on fire and thrown on the pile."

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  3. Key Ingredient In Mucus Could Fight Hospital Superbugs

    Of all the gross things that the human body can produce -- and let's face it folks, we can get pretty gnarly sometimes -- mucus has to be near the top of the heap. As unpleasant as it may be, though, that gunk does serve an important purpose, trapping bacteria and viruses before they can further infect your body. Now, MIT researchers are exploring the possibility that mucus could have the same disease preventing properties outside of your body, preventing bacteria from forming fortresses called biofilms.

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  4. Plasma Jet Kills Superbugs In Hospitals, Safe Enough To Use On Skin

    Superbugs, bacteria that develop in hospitals and are tough to kill with traditional antibiotics and antibacterials cleaning agents, are a growing problem in hospitals worldwide. Researchers at Queen's University Belfast may have found a chink in the armor of these hospital-acquired diseases like MRSA, a drug resistant strain of staph infection that killed nearly 20,000 Americans in 2005. A blast from a jet of electrically infused plasma may be just what the doctor ordered, breaking up the drug resistant colonies, called biofilms, formed by many of these bacteria and making them easier to kill as individuals.

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