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snails

  1. Relax, Everyone, Female Sea Snails Are No Longer Growing Penises Due to Harmful Chemicals. Situation Normal

    Sure, chemical companies. It's all fun and games until someone grows a penis.

    Feel free to go about your normal lives again, everybody. Toxic chemicals are no longer causing female sea snails to grow penises, so you can rest easy tonight. If your reaction to that is, "Wait, at some point female sea snails were growing penises? What?" Congratulations, the Internet has not dulled your ability to find things surprising.

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  2. Because Nature’s Terrifying, Here Are Some Newly Discovered Giant Fluorescent Pink Slugs

    Do we even have to mention that they were found in Australia, or is that just a given?

    Save for the creatures in the furthest depths of the ocean and a couple of Amazonian insect species, Australia pretty much has the market cornered on incredibly weird animals. Hell, their national symbol, the kangaroo, is basically a giant distended bunny rabbit with a built-in fanny pack and a penchant for punching people in the head. It shouldn't come as any surprise, then, that when rangers with the National Parks and Wildlife Services in Australia started to explore the Mount Kaputar region of New South Wales, they found a few new species that are just straight up unsettling, including cannibalistic snails and enormous pink slugs.

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  3. Marine Whelk Snails Are The Ocean’s Daddy Day Care, But Less Awful

    Marine whelk snails carry their young on their back, toting their eggs around for weeks after mating. The notion is not actually that uncommon under the seas -- male pipefish and seahorses are also known to take on surprisingly active paternal roles, like gestating their own young. However, a recent analysis of marine whelk eggs by researchers at UC Davis showed something surprising -- the whelks aren't just carrying their own kids on their back, but offspring from as many as 25 other males.

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