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royalties

  1. Youtube Now Has a Royalty-Free Music Section So Your Videos Will Stop Getting Taken Down

    Vloggers everywhere just started grinning uncontrollably and they don't know why.

    Your tutorial of how to knit the perfect Doctor Who scarf is finally done. You've uploaded it to Youtube and now all that's left to do is rake in the -- wait, why did you use Katy Perry's "E.T."  in the background? It's already been taken down without anybody seeing it. Youtube wants that to stop happening to you. Here's their solution.

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  2. Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Pandora Pays Artists Millions in Royalties, Not Profitable

    Internet radio, for all the complaints that it receives, is not a field that sees a great amount of participation. Due to the fees imposed by the RIAA, Internet radio has never really been a cost-effective business strategy for most. Webcasting has essentially been abandoned by the likes of Yahoo! and MSN, even though they built a large audience for their respective services. Pandora is probably the most well-known Internet radio company and is still struggling to turn a profit. Part of this is because they pay millions in royalties.

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  3. German Court Rules YouTube Solely Responsible For Uploaded Content, Royalties on Infringing Media

    YouTube hasn't been having a good month. First, Viacom's billion dollar lawsuit against the company was raised from the dead and allowed to proceed, and now a German court has ruled that YouTube is solely responsible for the content uploaded by their users. By extension, YouTube can and will probably be held responsible for paying back royalties on infringing content. It might not be a billion bucks, but it's still likely to be a hefty fee.

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  4. Music Royalty Collecting Agency Want Truckers to Have Licensed Music in Cabs

    Belgian music royalty collection agency SABAM has attempted to collect money from truck drivers who listen to music in their cabs, claiming that truck driver cabs is technically a place of work, so the music the drivers listen to while in their cabs should be licensed music. Since truckers obviously don't obtain licenses to listen to music in their vehicle--just like anyone who drives a car doesn't buy up the licenses to anything playing through their iPhone attachment--SABAM decided to go after them.

    Luckily for truck drivers, a member of the Belgian Parliament, Maggie Block, felt SABAM's claim was "utter nonsense," and that “the truck drivers don’t need the radio so much for playing music, but for their safety. So it is illogical that they should pay for it,” most likely referencing that truck drivers need the music to keep sane and awake. Along with Block, truckers have more support, in the form of Minister Vincent Van Quickenborne, who believes listening to the radio is essential for truckers, and most importantly, a trucker's cab is an intimate space, which means it's not actually part of the workplace, which is SABAM's primary basis for attempting to claim the royalties in the first place. In response to the politicians' disagreement with their logic, SABAM tyrannically claimed that they have the right to claim money from anyone who listens to music in the workplace, referring to an agreement they have with Quickenborne that allows them to claim money whenever they want from anyone so long as they're in violation of copyright laws, though the disagreement here is whether or not truckers actually are in violation of copyright laws, and if so, if being in violation of said laws actually improves the safety of the profession.

    (via TorrentFreak)

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  5. Musicians Uses Stolen Credit Cards to Buy Own Songs on iTunes Over 6,000 Times

    Between January 2008 and June 2009, Lemar Johnson, 19, and a group of nine other individuals used stolen credit cards to buy their own music that they uploaded to iTunes and Amazon. The group downloaded their songs around 6,000 times during the span of their scam, supposedly (and that's a big 'supposedly,' coming as it does from The Daily Mail) netting them around $773,000 in royalties.

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