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Redwall

  1. Fiction, a Gallery Show of Wonderfully Subtle and Strange Portraits of Literary Characters

    eye candy

    Modern Eden is showcasing the work of a number of artists all working off of the same idea: painted portraits of fictional characters old and new, from all genres. The portraits are lovely, but since they're original art, you'll be reaching deep to get one for yourself. Better to just gaze at them through the internet and sigh longingly. We've posted a few here, but there are more than two dozen at Modern Eden's site.

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  2. 6 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Movies That Hollywood Should Be Making Instead of Candy Land

    Power Grid

    Anyone else get the feeling that Hollywood is out of ideas? Take a look at this summer’s studio releases. What do you see? A lot of entries into pre-existing franchises (The Avengers, The Amazing Spider-Man, Prometheus), a sequel or twelve (Men in Black III, Madagascar 3), some additions to the “edgy kid’s story” genre that’s refused to die since Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland made bank, two movies based on self-help books (Think Like a Man, What to Expect When You’re Expecting), and one that draws its inspiration from a board game (Battleship). Look, I’m not here to pooh-pooh the idea of sequels, prequels, reboots, remakes—there are some ridiculously unnecessary ones, sure, but if I told you my level of anticipation for The Dark Knight Rises is not positively stratospheric I’d be lying. I’m not asking that Hollywood start coming out with original content or anything, because A) that’s what indie movies are for, and B) it would be unrealistic. Hollywood exists to make money. If people pay to see Madagascar 3, they’re going to make Madagascar 4. That’s how it works. But still. Movie versions of Candy Land (and Adam Sandler is attached, oh goodie!), Stretch Armstrong, and the Ouija board are in the works. Hollywood, I implore you: If you’re going to adapt something, can’t it be something good?

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  3. Encore! 10 More Non-Costumed, Non-Powered Female Heroines

    Power Grid

    Last month, we did a list of ten female heroes who don't wear costumes and don't have super powers... even though most of the people around them (or the people or things they're fighting) have one or the other. You guys seemed to really like it, which was nice, I mean that's what we always strive for; but you also had a lot of good ideas to add to the list. So, naturally, we decided we had to do another one.

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  4. The 10 Most Theoretically Delicious Sweets

    Power Grid

    It's getting awfully close to Halloween, and of course there's nothing better on the holiday than tons of candy. There are some delectables, however, that we will never be able to enjoy. No, I'm not just talking about Bertie Bots Every Flavor Beans. (Pic from a photoshoot of Dune recreated with a four-foot gummy worm.)

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  5. 10 Fictional Universes We’d Like To Live in Based on Food Alone

    Power Grid

    So here's the simple explanation: 1. We were trying to think of a Power Grid. 2. We were hungry. That's it. I'm being perfectly serious. What you see before you is the product of a few people sitting down to write something about fandom when they didn't have any snacks on hand. We started thinking about fantasy food and then had to make a list out of it.

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  6. 10 Places In Which We Can’t Believe Anyone Lives

    Power Grid

    TVTropes has a great entry called Crapsack World, which covers any setting where the innate horribleness of the environment, both physically and morally, taints the entire world view of the characters and most of the plot. However, one of the obvious tenets of the Crapsack World setting is that it can’t be escaped from: there’s nowhere else to go. Not so for the Crapsack city, vampire stricken town, or other murder, war, and crime plagued locations. Considering these places’ incredible frequency of death, unlawfulness, or unexplainable phenomena you’d think everybody would have moved out years ago. And yet… as far as you can tell they still function in much the way a normal community would.

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  7. 10 Hoopy Froods Who Really Know Where Their Towel Is

    Power Grid

    On Towel Day, all of Douglas Adams' fans are encouraged to carry a towel around with them, or to at least know where their towel is, following the great tradition of hitchhiking, traveling, managing, and adventuring laid out in his work. Naturally, this got us to thinking about all the hoopy (really together) froods (really amazingly together people) that we know in fiction that really know where their towels are. You know, the characters who you could drop off anywhere and anywhen in the space time continuum, and come back in an hour and they'd already be lounging in perfect confidence and opulence, and knocking back something highly alcoholic, on their towel (or towel equivalent). Because anyone who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where their towel is, is clearly a person to be reckoned with.

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  8. R.I.P. Brian Jacques

    The BBC reports this morning that Brian Jacques, the author behind the Redwall series of children's fantasy novels, died this weekend of a heart attack.  He was 71. The Redwall books were the first chapter books that drew me into becoming a voracious young reader, a primary refuge in an elementary school environment where I only had a couple of friends.  As mentioned elsewhere, I'd read Mariel of Redwall eleven times by the time I was eight.  And I know I'm not the only one who wished almost every day that they lived in Brian Jacques' exquisitely described world. The first book in the Redwall series was written with no intent to publish: while working as a truck driver delivering milk, Jacques befriended the students at a school for the blind and wrote Redwall in a exceptionally descriptive style precisely for them.  Fortunately for the rest of us, a friend showed his manuscript to a publisher without telling him, and the company immediately agreed to publish it and signed the author for five more novels.  Jacques' kindness towards his readers, especially children, didn't flag once he became a world famous author whose books have been published in twenty-eight languages, either.

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