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piracy

  1. U.S. Ambassador to Australia Asks Australians to Please Stop Pirating Game of Thrones

    Meanwhile...

    Jeffrey Bleich isn't your normal Game of Thrones fan. Oh, no. He also happens to be the U.S. Ambassador to Australia. And, in his official capacity as Ambassador, he has a message for you, Aussies: Stop pirating Game of Thrones! Stop it! Bad Aussies!

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  2. Netflix Makes a New Family Plan for All You Worthless Freeloaders

    the internet is serious business

    As far as allowing you freedom to watch, Netflix is pretty good about things. You can register up to six devices to an account at one time, and stream simultaneously to two. It's also pretty cool about passwords and log ons. No digging into your cable provider's website to find your registration info, or worse, calling your friend with HBO and instructing them on how to find that info on their cable provider's website. And so Netflix knows that somewhere around 10 million of its subscribers are getting the service for free, by logging in under the accounts of friends or family, but rather than cracking down on those folks, they're offering another option.

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  3. Movie Studios Get Circular, Ask Google to Take Down Their Own DMCA Takedown Requests

    Let's say you're a wealthy, seafaring merchant. You suspect a pirate is sneaking up the hull of your ship to steal your hard-earned doubloons in the hold, so you cry out to the Imperial Navy to arrest the dastardly villain! But when the Imperial pirate-hunter arrives, you panic and call to the Navy to come and arrest him, too -- yeah, the guy who was supposed to arrest the first guy. Well, that's sort of what some movie studios are doing right now. NBC Universal and Lionsgate, among others, are asking Google to take down the takedown requests they themselves had requested, and Google isn't having it.

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  4. Game of Thrones Season 3 Premiere Sets Piracy Records, HBO Doesn’t Care

    Two big things happened on Easter a few days ago: The Walking Dead season 3 finale and the Game of Thrones season 3 premiere aired at the same time. One of the two was exceptionally good and involved death, swinging blades, and beleaguered humanity, while the other broke a bunch of pirating records. Specifically, the Game of Thrones premiere was uploaded to the Internet and, within a few hours, a tracker reported 163,088 simultaneous downloads of a single torrent of the episode. People sure do like to not pay for things they love!

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  5. About Darn Time: HBO Is Considering Offering HBO GO to Non-Cable Subscribers

    Yes. Yes yes yes yes yes yes yes. Yes.

    Good news, HBO-less Game of Thrones fans. HBO has heard your pleas to make HBO GO, their online streaming service, available to those who don't have cable. And they have responded with a resounding "Maybe. Eventually." Hey, it's better than "no."

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  6. On Second Thought, Piracy Is NOT Ok, Says HBO And Game of Thrones Director

    Winter Is Coming

    When Game of Thrones director David Petrarca made a brief statement in support of online piracy at Perth's Writing Festival over the weekend, he probably wasn't expecting it to get him in trouble with his bosses. While we're not sure he did directly, HBO felt the need to issue a statement and after that, Petrarca was quick to retract his own. 

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  7. Game of Thrones Director Says Intense Piracy’s Actually Been a Good Thing

    Piracy is something that the television and film industry have to deal with on a regular basis. This is especially true for cable programs that are locked behind subscriptions and those shows that still delay television broadcasts across regions. Shows that do both and aren't available through traditional streaming channels? Well, those shows are going to hit the hardest by piracy. Game of Thrones, for example, has seen extensive piracy thanks to HBO's draconian policies. Director David Petrarca doesn't seem to think this has been an overall bad thing.

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  8. Six Strikes And You’re Out: What The Copyright Alert System Means For You

    As of today, three of the major Internet service providers in the United States -- Verizon, Time Warner, and AT&T -- are teaming up with the MPAA and RIAA to let you know that they're watching when you use torrents  to download music, movies or TV shows, and that they don't approve. That disapproval will initially be registered by warnings that remind you that Big Brother your ISP is watching -- the digital equivalent of a disapproving glare -- but that's not the only measure they have at their disposal. Repeat offenders could find themselves blocked from certain sites or even have their connection cut entirely, if temporarily. Keep reading to learn what we know about the new policy, what we don't, and how it could impact the way you use the Internet -- especially if you use it to download media, and come on, who doesn't?

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  9. Game of Thrones Director Says Piracy Is Ok While The Copyright Alert System Is Warning Consumers Against It

    You know nothing Jon Snow

    It didn't really surprise anyone to find out HBO's Game of Thrones was the most pirated show of 2012. After all, HBO is a paid subscription service and many people don't like their limited expensive options in a world immediate entertainment. But I suppose it doesn't help the cause when one of the people working the show, a director to be more specific, publicly says he doesn't mind when people pirate his show. And it just so happens that The Copyright Alert System is about to start sending us all notices to stop the illegal downloads. Great timing, dude. 

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  10. FBI Employees Apparently Big Fans of Piracy, Have Bad Taste in Television

    At this point, is anyone actually surprised to hear that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been caught sharing copyrighted material via BitTorrent? Sure, they have that spiffy anti-piracy emblem, and are in general meant to enforce the law where piracy's concerned, but it certainly seems that pretty much everyone that says they want to stop piracy also has employees that pirate. So, yes, TorrentFreak has found evidence that IP addresses associated with the FBI were pirating, but what's more shocking is their taste in television. Homeland? Really?

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  11. Documentary On The Pirate Bay Now Available On The Pirate Bay Because Of Course It Is

    TPB AFK, a documentary chronicling the brief but tumultuous life of everyone's favorite torrent site, The Pirate Bay, debuts today at the Berlinale Film Festival in Germany. But the film is making a more notable, if less orthodox, premiere today as well -- it's available for anyone who cares to to download it right from The Pirate Bay. Whatever you may say about the film itself, credit where credit's due -- director Simon Klose knows his audience. Check out the trailer after the jump.

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  12. World Trade Organization Gives Thumbs Up to Antiguan Piracy Site

    Last week we told you about Antigua's plan launch a website to distribute American content while ignoring United States copyright laws. Earlier this week, the World Trade Organization (WTO) the group gave Antigua the green light to move forward with the pirate website that Antigua still refuses to call a pirate website. To nobody's surprise, representatives from the United States are not happy about this situation.

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  13. Antigua Strikes Back: Country Wants to Launch Piracy Website to Punish America

    In retaliation for the United States repeatedly blocking Antigua from hosting online gambling, the country now plans to launch a website that will sell music, movies, and software from U.S. content-makers without paying royalties to the content's U.S. copyright holders. It's not surprising that the Antinguan government denies that the site qualifies as "privacy," and it's even less surprising that the U.S. isn't happy about the site and will try to stop it.

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  14. You Wouldn’t Steal a Museum Installation: The Pirate Bay’s First Server Put on Display

    One minute they're up in their room sharing files and the next they're incurring the wrath of intellectual property holders everywhere. This year -- September to be precise -- marks the tenth anniversary of when the equally beloved and despised The Pirate Bay file-sharing site was founded, enabling people the world over to watch and listen to media of all kinds without even having to pay a dime to do so; a quality which really hasn't earned it any popularity points within the film and music industries. To commemorate this milestone in unrepentant copyright infringement, the Computer Museum in Linköping, Sweden has placed the site's very first server on permanent display as a part of its "50 years of file-sharing" wing to be revered by techies, and possibly smashed by crowbar-wielding corporate goons, everywhere. The fact we're treating modern technology with the same respect as ancient religious relics has to be saying something about our current culture.

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  15. Major Record Labels, Government Departments Caught Pirating Files on BitTorrent

    Yesterday, we reported that employees of several major movie studios were caught pirating files on BitTorrent. It seems Hollywood isn't alone in its do-as-we-say-not-as-we-do pirating ways. TorrentFreak since revealed that the Big Three music labels, as well as government agencies, and even foreign parliaments were caught red-handed using BitTorrent. This is a little like being told not to smoke by someone while they themselves are lighting a cigarette.

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  16. Hollywood Motion Picture Studios Caught Pirating Games, Movies, and Television Shows via BitTorrent

    The thought that motion picture studios, including members of the Motion Picture Association of America, or MPAA, have been pirating content through the use of BitTorrent is one of those things that's long been suspected, and TorrentFreak reports that they now have proof. Specifically, they worked with BitTorrent monitors Scaneye to track down what IP addresses associated with the member studios of the MPAA have been illegally accessing, and the results were pretty much what you'd expect.

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  17. Game of Thrones is Officially the Most Pirated Television Show of 2012

    the internet is serious business

    Game of Thrones lost out on the "most pirated television" title last year to Dexter. Could the scrappy younger show pull out the ignominious win this year? Yes. Yes it could.

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  18. Two New Pirate Bay Proxies Launch After UK Pirate Party Forced to Discontinue Their Own

    Without coming down on either side of the piracy argument, we can all probably agree that the methods currently being used to combat piracy are ineffective at best. At worst, the whole industry appears to be absolutely set on trying to catch lightning in a bottle. One of the recent attempts saw music industry group BPI putting legal pressure on the UK Pirate Party to drop their proxy service to The Pirate Bay. After initially indicating that they'd fight the legal battle, the proxy was taken down. In response, similar parties in Argentina and Luxembourg have launched their own proxies.

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  19. Judge Slaps Pirate With $1.5 Million in Damages for Sharing Seven Porn Clips

    Let's just get this out of the way immediately: Never, ever, miss the chance to defend yourself if you're being accused of piracy. Regardless of whether you're guilty to some degree, plaintiffs have consistently shown that they believe any infringement upon their content to be worth millions of dollars. This public service announcement is unfortunately far too late for Anwar Ogiste of Maryland, as a federal judge has already awarded a default judgment of $1.5 million to adult company Flava Works. Ogiste's crime? Sharing seven porn videos.

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  20. Finnish Nine-Year-Old Given Laptop by Mysterious Donors After Police Seize Hers

    Sometimes the Finnish police raid the homes of nine-year-old girls and confiscate their Winnie the Pooh laptops. That really happens. Okay, it happened once, but it's pretty messed up. The girl, whose computer was confiscated after being accused of illegally downloading one song off The Pirate Bay, was given a used MacBook Pro by a group of donors. The group asked to remain anonymous, but hit the jump to see us take a few guesses anyway.

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