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online piracy

  1. New Stats Suggest MegaUpload Actually Helped the Film Industry More Than it Hurt

    Regardless of whether or not you engage in online piracy, I think we can all agree that common sense dictates that the practice would be hurting copyright-holding media companies like record labels and film studios. Well, it seems that, in this case, common sense doesn't hold up under scrutiny. Research from the Munich School of Management and Copenhagen Business School has supposedly gathered statistical evidence indicating that dubious online streamer MegaUpload may have actually helped global box office sales for all but the biggest of blockbusters.

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  2. MegaUpload Successor May Launch on the Anniversary of Kim Dotcom’s Arrest

    Despite the best efforts of copyright-holders everywhere, it looks like MegaUpload is poised to make a comeback of sorts. The pirate site's founder Kim Dotcom already announced that he's working on a cloud-based successor to the site. Ever the troll, Dotcom now says that he plans to launch his new streaming site, simply entitled "Mega"exactly one year after a SWAT team arrested him during an assault on his New Zealand estate.

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  3. Microsoft Sends DMCA Requests to the BBC, Wikipedia, and More

    The world of internet piracy and online copyright enforcement is rife with stories of incompetence, especially on the side of major corporations and copyright holders. Many of those problems stem from the fact that the most frequently used weapon of copyright-holders, sending DMCA takedown requests to remove sites illegally sharing copyrighted material from search engines, is automated. The systems in place send an obscene number of notices, including duplicate requests for sites that have already been removed and now, apparently, random requests to remove any site even slightly connected to a company's copyrighted material. For example, a recent rash of DMCA notices from Microsoft asked Google to delist a series of popular, most-likely non-infringing sites, including TechCrunch, The Huffington Post, BBC.com, and Wikipedia.

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  4. The Canadian Government Mistakenly Sponsored The Pirate Bay

    Everybody is supposed to hate internet pirates. That's just how it is now: If you don't, you might end up on some kind of watch list or something. The Canadian government is going to be pretty embarrassed, then, when everybody finds out the Canadian Department of Finance recently bought ads on one of Canada's most popular websites, The Pirate Bay.

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  5. Pirates Beware: Google Takedown Requests Up 1,137% Since 2011

    It's not a good time to be in the business of helping internet pirates. According to a new report, Google has seen a dramatic rise in DMCA takedown requests in recent months. How high, you ask? Requests have doubled in the last few weeks, and spiked an unbelievable 1,137 percent year-over-year. According to the report, Google received requests to take down 1.5 million URLs per week last month. In July 2011, they were asked to take down an average of 131,577 each week.

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