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MrBabyMan

  1. The Rebellion Against Digg v4

    If the comments on almost every Digg frontpage article are to be believed, today marks the day that many Digg users plan to jump ship, if they haven't already done so. "Make RIPP DIGG your profile image Monday is Abandon Digg Day," reads one often copy-pasted comment. Many commenters extol the newfound virtues of Digg's sorta-rival in the social bookmarking business, Reddit, which recently struck a rebellious, pro-user pose by defying its corporate masters at Condé Nast and running free advertisements in support of Proposition 19 when Condé forbid it to "benefit financially"off of the issue of relaxing anti-marijuana laws. Since last Wednesday, when Digg underwent a major overhaul and became Digg v4, the grievance against the site has been that it's sold its user base out to big publishers and advertisers. Whereas Digg content used to be driven by user submissions, now, publishers automatically submit articles via RSS feed, from whence they get Diggs up -- the unit of social currency that determines what content makes it to the site's front page -- primarily from their "followers," the users who subscribe to their feeds. The new Digg looks, therefore, like a mix of Facebook, Twitter, and RSS. Is the new Digg as broken as its detractors are saying? The front page, for its part, does not make the new Digg look like a site that anyone would want to read.

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