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moons

  1. Astronomers Say There May Be Waves On Titan’s Seas, But Don’t Plan To Go Surfing “Just Yet”

    But, like, if you did, it would be gnarly.

    At yesterday's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference scientist Jason Barnes made an incredible announcement: NASA's Cassini Spacecraft has detected unusual glints of light that may indicate waves on Saturn's largest moon Titan. Saturn: go for the rings, stay for Titan's hydrocarbon boogie boarding.

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  2. Rover Watches Mars’ Moons Pass One Another In The Night For First Time Ever [Video]

    Man, I wish we had two moons...

    Today, NASA demonstrated just how neat it would be if the Earth had two moons. This video, stitched together from numerous stills captured by the Mars Curiosity rover's Mast camera, offer the first look at Mars' larger moon, Phobos, passing in front of and blotting out the planet's smaller moon, Deimos.

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  3. SETI Researcher Discovers New 14th Moon of Neptune

    The tiny satellite -- just 12 miles across -- is practically invisible, and was even missed by the Voyager probe.

    As we discover more and more amazing features of space -- like mind-bogglingly massive baby stars and exoplanets that could one day be a new cradle for humanity -- it's worth remembering that we still have plenty of things to learn about our own little corner of the cosmos. The face of our solar system got a new wrinkle this week when NASA announced the discovery of a new moon in orbit around Neptune. The tiny satellite -- just 12 miles across --  is the fourteenth to be found orbiting the icy outer planet.

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  4. Watch Live as SETI Institute Announces Official Names of Pluto’s Smallest Known Moons

    The public voted and decided the names should be "Vulcan" and "Kerberos", but it won't be official until SETI says it is.

    Today at 12:00 PM EDT you can jump on a Google Hangout with SETI to hear the official naming of Pluto's two smallest known moons. SETI held a vote a few months ago, and the winning names were "Vulcan" and "Cerberus." Cerberus is already the name of an asteroid, so to avoid any confusion they're expected to use the alternate Greek spelling "Kerberos." We've got the live video right here.

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  5. An Even Better Look at Asteroid 1998 QE2 and Its Moon

    Okay, yeah, that's no space station.

    As you may recall, asteroid 1998 QE2 gave the Earth a buzz just over a week ago. Upon close examination, it was determined that 1998 QE2 actually had a moon of its own. That's not unheard of, though we didn't know 1998 QE2 had one. Some images were combined to form a video of the binary group shortly after discovery, but now an even better look at the two has been created thanks to scientists working with the Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California.

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  6. The Nerds Win! Plutonian Moons Have Been Named

    First the SETI Institute put it up for vote, then the geeks and nerds swarmed the Internet, and now it's as certain as it can be before the International Astronomical Union (IAU) makes the final call: The names of last two moons of Pluto have been chosen, courtesy of 450,324 votes and William Shatner. And the Plutonian award goes to....

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  7. It’s Still Not a Planet, But You Can Name Pluto’s Moons!

    Our old friend Pluto may still be sore about its demotion from a planet to an ice dwarf, but the good news is that we can name its moons. Two of them, anyway. Today, the SETI Institute has opened up the official naming to the public. Keep reading to learn what names are out to an early lead and how you can put your two cents in.

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  8. Mirror, Mirror: Two of Saturn’s Moons Face Off Across Its Rings

    While the above picture may look like an asteroid as seen in an enormous cosmic mirror, it's not -- it's much, much cooler than that. This is the one of the latest images from NASA's Cassini probe, which shows two of Saturns "shepherd moons" -- Pandora and Prometheus, and we swear we're not making that up -- seemingly staring at one another down across the planet's rings.

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  9. Complete Geologic Map of Io Shows 425 Volcanoes But No Craters

    Our own moon is something of a dead, crater-ridden boulder careening around the Earth, doing little of interest in the meantime. Sure, it's got some interesting features and it probably has more than a few secrets left to be uncovered, but nothing is really going on up there. Jupiter's moons, on the other hand, tend to be a little more active. Io, for example, has a vast sulfur landscape and hundreds upon hundreds of active volcanoes. Now, for the first time, we have a full geologic map of the moon's surface, indexing all of its harsh alien glory, including 425 volcanoes and not a single crater.

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  10. Five of Saturn's Moons in One Breathtaking Picture

    Since it arrived in orbit around Saturn after seven years of flying, the Cassini-Hyugens spacecraft has captured some truly incredible images of the ringed planet. The latest among them is this photo, which was taken on July 29 but released just a few days ago. It shows five of the planet's 62 moons and edge of Saturn's rings, arranged with astounding artistry. Since most people are not familiar with the satellites of Saturn, NASA has provided this helpful information:
    Janus (179 kilometers, or 111 miles across) is on the far left. Pandora (81 kilometers, or 50 miles across) orbits between the A ring and the thin F ring near the middle of the image. Brightly reflective Enceladus (504 kilometers, or 313 miles across) appears above the center of the image. Saturn's second largest moon, Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across), is bisected by the right edge of the image. The smaller moon Mimas (396 kilometers, or 246 miles across) can be seen beyond Rhea also on the right side of the image.
    (NASA via Universe Today)

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