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Max Planck Institute

  1. World’s Smallest Snowflake Created, Only Takes 275 Water Molecules

    Have you ever wondered how many molecules, exactly, it actually takes to make an ice crystal? You haven't? Yeah, us neither. That hasn't stopped researchers at Germany's Max Planck Institute from devoting significant portions of their rapidly passing mortal lives to answering that question. We can all now sleep better knowing that to make an ice crystal, you need about 275 water molecules.

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  2. Scientists Establish First Working Quantum Network, Quantum Internet On The Way

    With amount of components we can cram on a chip slowly reaching its physical limit, quantum has become the next big thing that could revolutionize the computing world. IBM is even on the cusp of building actual quantum computer protoypes. But what good is any of that if we don't have a quantum Internet? Fortunately, we do. A team of scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have just established the first working quantum network.

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  3. Diamonds Are A Quantum Computer's Best Friend

    Quantum computing is a new and exciting field, emerging from the ability to utilize quantum mechanics to create computers that can perform complex operations on data. Scientists have been making progress developing quantum computers and they know what is required to make such a system. Though they have developed working systems, scientists still believe that no existing machine has reached the full potential of quantum computing. The trend in quantum computing research is shifting away from proof-of-principle and focusing on trying to make a better way to control quantum bits (qubits) to perform operations. New research described in papers in Nature Physics by a team from the Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Physical Letters Review by a team from the Department of NanoBiophotonics at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Germany has found that impure diamonds may be an effective architecture for quantum computing.

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