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Journalism

  1. The Associated Press Will Soon Use Robots to Write Stories

    "01101000 01100101 01101100 01101100 01101111 00100000 01110111 01101111 01110010 01101100 01100100," wrote the robots in a statement.

    Greetings human—I mean, hey, did you know that robots have learned how to write? And I don't mean they can print out words that someone else wrote; they can now literally produce fact-based news writing all on their own, and the Associated Press will soon have them doing just that.

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  2. Earthquake Interrupts Chinese Reporter’s Marriage So She Covers It in Her Dress [Video]

    In case you weren't already aware, a 6.6-magnitude earthquake hit a rural area of China's Sichuan province at 8AM local time on Saturday. The exact number of dead and injured isn't clear just yet, but many are reporting at least 100 dead and many times more than that injured. A little strange levity came out of this, though: One reporter -- identified as Chen Ying -- had her marriage ceremony interrupted by the quake, and went on to then cover it in her wedding dress.

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  3. CBS Would Like to Have Its Editorial Independence Cake and Eat It Too

    As you may or may not recall, CBS made waves not all that long ago when they decreed from on high that CNET, which exists under the greater CBS umbrella, would not be granting Dish Network's Hopper an award after this year's Consumer Electronics Show. Now, the award would have normally been a blip on the radar, but CBS interfering with CNET's journalism gave the whole thing way more publicity. More amusing, however, is the fact that CBS is also fighting for the editorial independence of CNET when it comes to an injunction to prevent them from covering BitTorrent. Yeah.

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  4. Superman is a Blogger Now, Time of Death for Print Media Now Official

    Good news and bad news, everyone. The bad news? Marvel and DC are continuing their frankly troubling and stupid streak of revealing what's happening in next week's comics before those books actually hit the stands. The good news? The latest spoiler is for something you couldn't give a damn about with a gun to your head anyway. So, everyone ready? Clark Kent is quitting his job as a reporter for the Daily Planet, because he has too much journalistic integrity to work there any more. However, everybody has to make a living, even superheroes, and so, Superman will be running his own blog.

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  5. Samsung Flew Bloggers from India to Berlin, Then Threatened to Not Bring Them Back

    Attending conventions as press can be a beleaguering experience. This is especially true if, say, someone has offered you a plane ticket, hotel accommodations, and then threatens to leave you there if you don't comply with their wishes. This is apparently what happened to Clinton Jeff, of Unleash the Phones, and another unnamed blogger after they were brought to this year's IFA conference in Berlin by Samsung.

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  6. A Lesson In Knowing Your Audience

    It’s unfortunate that my list of tips for writers was published when it was this week. If it had only been a day or two sooner, it maybe could have saved Kotaku a major headache. Jen Schiller, an intern at Kotaku, published a rather dismissive article about professional gaming this past Tuesday that was based on an interview over at Alienware Arena with David "Zaccubus" Treacy. The final tip I gave in my list was to know your audience and, sadly, it looks as if Schiller might have misunderstood exactly who it was she was talking to and what she was talking about. At best, her article was insulting, dismissive, and poorly-sourced. At worst, it was full of falsehoods and a great example of negligent journalism. It takes more than a snippet of a quote or a quick skim of an article to fully understand the intent. As some have pointed out, it’s not as if there aren’t many an example out there of, shall we say, less-than-stellar journalism. Sometimes this is intentional trolling or sensationalism while a post of this kind from an intern feels more like a misstep and an opportunity to learn.

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  7. Journalism Warning Labels

    British funnyman Tom Scott devised a set of stick-on "warning labels" for faulty journalism; he claims that he's been wandering the London Underground sticking them on newspapers. My favorite is the one above:

    The Daily Mail's attempt to classify everything as either 'causing' and 'curing' cancer is already well documented, but there's plenty of wacky medical claims in all the newspapers. Ooh, look, some healing crystals.

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