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IBM

  1. Experience Watson In His Element By Harkening Back To His Jeopardy Glory Days

    Team Ken Jennings Forever.

    Earlier this week, we told you that IBM's super-duper super-computer Watson might one day be able to treat cancer patients by analyzing their genes (something Ken Jennings can never hope to accomplish, sadly). But that's the possible future, and who cares about that? Let's focus on what we know Watson is capable of: kicking human butt on Jeopardy.

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  2. One Day IBM Watson Might Be Able To Treat Your Cancer

    I'll take "chemotherapy" for $400, Alex.

    Today IBM announced a new program they're working on that will use Watson, their now infamous Jeopardy-playing supercomputer, to treat cancer patients by analyzing data from their genes. Yeah, let's see how you like it when robots start doing your jobs better than you, oncologists!

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  3. Bill Gates Admits That Control+Alt+Delete Was A Big Mistake

    Next maybe he'll have something to say about the blue screen of death.

    The "three finger salute" of Control+Alt+Delete has been a part of Microsoft lore since it was first put into the Acorn computers in 1981 by developer David Bradley. It's also used to log in to Windows 7 and below, which annoys users to this day. Gates is real sorry about that, as it turns out.

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  4. IBM Wants Folks Developing Software for Watson Supercomputer So It Can Do More Than Win Jeopardy!

    Sure, the Watson Supercomputer is pretty great at Jeopardy!, but IBM thinks it's time to branch out. They're going to be giving software developers access to Watson with a goal to "launch an ecosystem where Watson is a service and you build applications around it," said CEO Ginni Rometty. Could Watson soon challenge -- and probably dominate -- Siri?

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  5. Here’s a Stop-Motion Film Made Entirely From Shifting Atoms Around

    Here's a fun fact about IBM's research on storing data atom by atom -- sometimes, it gets really boring. Our latest evidence for this phenomenon is that the folks working on the project feel like making the world's tiniest stop-motion film is a better use of their time, and I'm not going to say that they're wrong. The result of their efforts at atomic animation is this short, A Boy and His Atom.

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  6. Watson Supercomputer Goes To College, Revenge Of The Nerds Style Antics Imminent

    IBM's Watson supercomputer is a pretty smart machine, already capable of trouncing our finest humans in trivia contests. There's always room for improvement, though, and in a move certain to leave Peter Thiel like, SOOOOO pissed, the team developing Watson is sending the computer to college, where it will bone up on coursework in English and math. Pretty soon, not only will Watson be better at trivia than you, it will also be able to trounce you in beer pong, meaning it's officially time for us to just pack it in as a species, folks. The machines have already won.

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  7. IBM Scientist Once Taught Watson Supercomputer Urban Dictionary, Made the Best Mistake of His Life

    Parrots and supercomputers are pretty similar despite one being a living organism and the other an artificial intelligence destined to subjugate the human race, especially when it comes to teaching them new things that they'll retain and repeat back verbatim. The Watson supercomputer, hailed at one point as perhaps the most sophisticated and intelligent piece of hardware known to man, more than proved this unlikely correlation when IBM scientist Eric Brown decided back in 2010 that what Watson needed more than anything was the kind of youthful street savvy that only the Urban Dictionary can deliver. If you've ever glanced through the pages of this compendium of modern slang, then you don't need to be a genius to figure out that Brown's good intentions didn't go over as well as he had expected.

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  8. Your Breath Smells Terrible, and Someone Wants Your iPhone to Know That

    In their annual series of "5-in-5" predictions, IBM predicted that by 2018 computers will replicate all five human senses. Seems like one company doesn't want to wait that long. Adamant Technologies in San Fransisco is working to get the iPhone a sense of smell. One reason the company gives for doing this is to warn people when they have bad breath, but we'd love to see the technology used to prevent us from drunk dialing our exes.

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  9. IBM Predicts Computers Will Replicate Human Senses by 2018, We Predict We’re All Dead by 2019

    In their annual "5 in 5" series of predictions, IBM looks for trends in technology and where they will take us five years from now. In this year's installment, IBM predicts that computers will be able to replicate all five human senses by 2018. Computers that can understand the world the way we do would be a huge leap forward. It could also be really, really terrifying. Let's just accept our metal overlords and go about our business.

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  10. In the Spin Zone: IBM Researchers Take Big Step Toward Quantum Computing

    Researchers have mapped the spin of electrons in a semiconductor for the first time, marking a big step forward in the march toward quantum computing. By synchronizing the subatomic particles, researchers were able to extend their spin lifetimes to just over 1 nanosecond. That's about the same time an existing computer processor takes to cycle, and offers proof of concept that quantum-based processors can remain stable long enough to encode information, according to a study published online this week in the journal Nature Physics.

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