comScore

Wait, what?

Looks like you came here from Geekosystem. Don't worry, everything is still here. We've just combined forces with The Mary Sue to bring you more and better content, all in one place.

humans

  1. New Study Shows Human Faces Evolved for Punching

    I thought that's what God made pillows for?

    Your face? That wasn't made for smiling. Your hands? Not for holding! Research published today says our species has a more violent past than previously thought, to the extent that our ancestors' faces were made to be punched.

    Read More
  2. Awwwww Yeeaaah, Humans and Neanderthals Totally Hooked Up

    We're a little less highbrow here and a little more protruding brow.

    While we've all been mindlessly wasting our lives browsing the Internet, science has been busy answering the tough questions -- like, did Neanderthals and humans ever bang? It's been theorized for years that the two species interbred with one another at some point, and now a new method of genome analysis confirms it. So yes, they totally banged.

    Read More
  3. First Successful Interspecies Cell Transplants Could Pave the Way for Future Pig-to-Human Transplants

    Transplanting insulin producing cells from rats to mice isn't human medicine yet, but it's a hell of a first step.

    Researchers at Northwestern Medicine have successfully transplanted insulin-producing cells across species lines -- removing cells from rats and implanting them in mice -- without using drugs to prevent rejection of the foreign cells. While the transplant may seem like a small victory -- mice and rats are pretty similar, after all -- it marks a significant step forward in interspecies transplants that could one day save human lives by allowing the implantation of insulin-producing "islet" cells without necessitating the use of immunosuppressive drugs that can have dire side effects. 

    Read More
  4. Empathy for Robots Looks Very Similar to the Empathy We Feel for Humans

    Robots may not have the capacity to care about us  yet, but that won't stop humans from feeling unrequited love for their android buddies. While it may seem obvious to those of us who have harbored a mad Data crush at one point or another, a new study seems to confirm that humans harbor a great deal of empathy for their robotic brethren, reacting to affection towards -- or violence against -- them in the same way they react to these things in humans.

    Read More
  5. Ladies and Gentlemen, Turns Out We Were All Once Ladies and Ladies [Video]

    Alright, fellas -- anyone out there still troubled by the prospect of getting in touch with their feminine side is officially not only on the wrong side of history, but biology as well. That's because, once upon a time in the womb, every person on the planet started life as a female. The mechanisms behind this drastic change from one gender to another can be pretty difficult to grasp, but the incomparable dry erase board artists of AsapSCIENCE are here once again to unravel these scientific complexities and deliver them in an easily grasped format, with lots of bright colors and pictures.

    Read More
  6. Knock it Off, Humans! Your Behavior Freaks Out Elk

    Oh, humanity, you're a real piece of work. When we're not callously wiping out an entire species of animal through overhunting or habitat destruction, it turns out we're scaring the living daylights out of them. During a year-long study of elk in southwestern Alberta, a research party led by Simone Ciuti from the University of Alberta noticed that the presence of humans left the elk more on edge than the presence of their natural predators, like bears and wolves. The elk seemed particularly put off by humans in vehicles, though it seems fair to assume that bears and wolves driving ATVs would have left them equally unnerved.

    Read More
  7. Researchers Find Evidence That Humans Used Fire 1 Million Years Ago

    After performing an analysis on materials found in Wonderwerk Cave in South Africa -- a site that past excavations have shown were occupied by humans -- scientists found evidence of charred bone fragments and plant ash, which in turn is evidence for the use of fire. One might suggest that the fire could have been accidental, but scientists found the plant and bone evidence next to tools in a layer that dates to one million years old, which the scientists feel is evidence that fire was used by the humans who used the tools, one million years ago. This would push the earliest thought use of fire by humans back by around 300,000 years.

    Read More
© 2014 The Mary Sue   |   About UsAdvertiseNewsletterJobsContributorsComment PolicyPrivacyUser AgreementDisclaimerContactArchives RSS

Dan Abrams, Founder
  1. Mediaite
  2. The Mary Sue
  3. Styleite
  4. The Braiser
  5. SportsGrid
  6. Gossip Cop