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GCHQ

  1. The NSA Helped British Spies Observe Yahoo Users For Years

    Mostly to figure out why they still used Yahoo?

    Here's news to make you recoil from your computer in disgust: we're not done with horrifying NSA revelations. The Guardian broke the news today that the NSA helped its British equivalent GCHQ spy on Yahoo users from 2008 to 2010 as part of operation "Optic Nerve," and now spies know what a lot of us look like naked. M would be outraged.

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  2. Canadian Man Claims to Have Cracked Unsolvable British Pigeon Code

    Last month the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) publicly posted a WWII code found with the remains of a dead messenger pigeon. They believed that the code was uncrackable without further information, and hoped that by making the code public someone could provide the missing piece of the puzzle. That's exactly what happened. A Canadian man says he was able to crack the code in 17 minutes with an inherited codebook. He even believes he knows who sent the message.

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  3. British Intelligence Asks for Help With Dead Pigeon’s World War II Code

    British intelligence is seeking public assistance in cracking a coded message found on the leg of a dead World War II carrier pigeon. The agency GCHQ has been working on deciphering the message for the past few weeks, but they believe the code could be impossible to break without additional information. They're hoping they can get said information from the public, which is why we're now hearing about it. We'd like to help, but we're still having trouble figuring out GCHQ.

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  4. New Law Aims To Monitor Calls, Texts, Emails, and Web History Of U.K. Users

    A new U.K. law, expected to be announced during the Queen's Speech in May, would allow the Government Communications Headquarters ( -- a British intelligence agency -- to have unlimited access to a wealth of information about U.K. citizens' communications. The law, which proponents claim is necessary for tackling terrorism and crime in general, would allow the GCHQ to pull up records concerning any citizen's phone calls, text messages, emails, and web history. At the moment, access to such information requires the permission of a Magistrate, much in the same way search warrants work in the United States. The new law, however, would remove this step.

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