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DRM

  1. Apple Trial Reveals They Forced iPod Restore Messages to Delete iTunes Competitors’ Music

    Dammit, sad iPod. I trusted you and your "pity me" face.

    Apple might be all about DRM-free music and free hugs and high fives for everyone or whatever these days, but that wasn't always the case. In fact, an iPod DRM trial has revealed that they once went so far as to force customers to restore their devices to delete competitors' music.

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  2. X-Wing, TIE Fighter Games Coming DRM-Free to GOG.com With More LucasArts Classics

    We've time traveled, yes?

    The classic X-Wing and TIE Fighter games of the '90s are finally getting digital rereleases thanks to a deal between Disney and GOG.com!

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  3. Apple Is Going to Trial for $350 Million Over… iPods?

    My time machine worked! It's 2005!

    Sure, iPods still exist, but it's not every day that they specifically pop up in the news, because nobody needs them anymore. I think the Apple store just uses them as something to jam under table legs to make sure their display surfaces don't wobble. But now they're the focal point of a fairly expensive legal battle for Apple over whether or not their DRM practices gave the little MP3 players an edge in the market.

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  4. Will Hollywood Follow GOG.com Into DRM-Free Movie Downloads?

    Thus leaving us agog.

    Music services like iTunes brought digital distribution into the spotlight long ago, but in the years since, concern over the ease of copying files have led to Digital Rights Management (DRM) issues and a slew of different solutions. Launched back in 2008 under the name Good Old Games, GOG.com has made a name for itself in DRM-free video games, and they just launched an initiative to bring the same freedom to movies and TV. But will Hollywood go along for the ride?

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  5. Citizens of Delaware Can Now Inherit Digital Assets, Rest of Us Stuck With Analog Estates

    "To you, I bequeath all 800 of my Flappy Bird knockoffs."

    Currently, all of the digital wealth you've built up—iTunes libraries, Steam games, Farmville micro-transaction purchases—is the property of whatever service provides that particular online account upon your passing, but a new law enacted in Delaware will allow citizens to inherit their loved ones' digital possessions. On a related note, the top Google search term in Delaware is now "permanently delete Fifty Shades of Grey from Kindle account."

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  6. Comixology Announces DRM Free Digital Comics Downloads: You Can Really Own Your Comics Now

    Time to buy a new external hard drive.

    I love digital comics for what they do for my ability to read back issues, try out new series, and get caught up on old. But there's always that little consumer worry in the back of my head: what I'm trading for this convenience is that technically I'm renting those comics, not buying them. No more, says Comixology. Kinda.

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  7. Keurig Is Planning to Make Coffee Machines That Only Work With Officially Licensed “Pods”

    I take my coffee black and DRM-free, please.

    Green Mountain Coffee Roasters are not content to have a single-serving Keurig coffee machine in every home and office building; they want dibs on those little pods you use to make the coffee, too. So like the movie industry and music industry before them, they've decided to shut out the competition with the cunning use of DRM-locks.

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  8. GOG Now Lets You Return Downloaded Games That You Can’t Get To Work

    And you don't even have to stand in line!

    We're sure this has happened to everybody at least once -- you download a game off the Internet that, by all accounts, shouldn't have a problem running on your computer, and it still crashes every single time. Most downloaded game policies will tell you that you're fresh out of luck. GOG.com, however, is trying something new.

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  9. Microsoft Completely Backpedals on Xbox One Used Game and Internet Connection Policies

    They should call the console the Xbox 180, since that's totally what they just pulled. Zing!

    It’s really easy to hate on Microsoft right now, and for good reason -- the more we heard about their draconian rules for the Xbox One, the more we never wanted to pick up an Xbox controller ever again. Apparently, however, Microsoft's grokked just how angry even the most lenient of gamers are right now, because they've announced a complete reversal of practically every single policy that's gotten heat from critics. Wait, really? Just like that? Well, now things are about to get interesting.

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  10. Your Used Games Are Killing the Game Industry Because They’re Actually Affordable

    How dare you not buy every game at full price the exact moment it's released? You should feel bad.

    Despite the popularity of the Gears of War series, game designer Cliff Bleszinski isn't particularly well known for his ability to embrace the gaming culture that exists outside the industry's interests. That's probably why he recently sent out a series of tweets backing XBox One's decision to make reselling used games a thing of the past. According to him, that's the only way to save the $60 game model -- and the entire gaming industry as a result -- from collapsing. Yes, because it's not the industry's fault for making games so expensive, it's your fault for not being able to afford them at the full retail price. Silly you, choosing to spend that money on food or rent!

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