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Depression

  1. Learn the Science of Depression From AsapSCIENCE

    At least the science as we know it now.

    Depression is something we can all stand to know more about. It's a serious condition that affects millions of people directly, and even more indirectly. Knowing how something works is a great first step in being able to treat it, and our understanding of depression has changed a lot in recent years. This video from AsapSCIENCE explains how.

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  2. Are These America’s Most Depressing Professions?

    I don't see "writer of Internet" anywhere here!

    Be nice to your bus driver, guys—if new research is to be believed, people who work in passenger transit are far more likely to be depressed, than, say, coal miners. Frankly, I'm a little dubious. Maybe be nice to everyone, just in case?

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  3. Internet Use Could Help Depressed Retirees Because the Internet Is the Best

    We assume these results are negated if they read the comments section.

    If you're retired and feeling depressed about it, try using the Internet more! At least, that's according to new research published in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. It says Internet use gave retirees a better chance of avoiding depression than their offline counterparts.

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  4. Scientists Link Cat Bites To Depression In Women, Somehow

    But I thought kitties were supposed to stave off depression? The whole world is a lie.

    Cat people say that kitties are great for your mental health - but science begs to differ. A new study published in PLOS ONE shows that, of the 1.3 million patient files studied over 10 years, 41% of people who had once hit up a hospital for a cat bite later returned to be treated for depression. Oh, and the researchers don't know why.

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  5. Fruit Flies Taught to Be Helpless and Depressed for Science

    Don't take this wrong, but in a lot of ways, you're not so different from a fruit fly. At least, the same sort of things that can make you depressed, like feeling helpless to change or bad situations in your life, also make fruit flies exhibit similar symptoms, such as slower movement and general lethargy. That's according to a study set to be published next month in the journal Current Biology which suggests that the roots of depression may go much deeper than once thought.

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  6. Old People Who Play Video Games Are Happier, Higher Functioning Than Non-Gaming Peers

    Want to prevent yourself from becoming depressed as you get older? Keeping your video game habit going may be a good first step. A study released this week in the journal Computers in Human Behavior suggests that elderly people who play video games -- even just occasionally -- are more social, better adjusted, and less likely to be depressed than their non-gaming peers.

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  7. Mobilyze! App Aims Use Your Smartphone To Diagnosis Depression, Dole Out Advice

    Your smartphone already knows a lot about you at any given time, like where you are, whether you're moving, if you've been emailing or texting a lot, or if you're missing a lot of calls. But is this enough information to, say, diagnose depression? Researchers at Northwestern University are aiming to find out with the app Mobilyze! which hopes to do exactly that.

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  8. Study Shows Coffee Can Help Prevent Depression, Empty Coffee Cups

    If you need a study to tell you that coffee may prevent depression, you probably don't drink coffee. If you did, you would know that its magical, motivational properties can compel you to accomplish tasks with reckless abandon in a delightful, suddenly-I-don't-hate-being-alive-this-morning sort of way. Well, a study of 50,000 female nurses published in the Archives of Internal Medicine shows that coffee (but only the real, caffeinated stuff) reduces the occurrence of depression, in women at least. Doctors, being doctors, are suggesting more study rather than suggesting that women start drinking more coffee. Ladies, allow me to suggest that you start drinking more coffee. The study, orchestrated by doubtlessly caffeinated folks from The Harvard Medical School, tracked the involved nurses for an entire decade, relying on self-reporting to record their coffee consumption. The results were that out of the 2,600 who developed varying degrees of depression, coffee drinking was not popular. In comparison to the non-drinkers who had one cup or less per week, women who drank two to three cups a day where 15% less likely to become depressed; the guzzlers who drank four or more were 20% less likely, assuming no one tried to pry them off the coffee maker.

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  9. Study: Depressed Patients Truly See A Gray World

    It's been said that depressed people see a world without color. But according to new research from the journal Biological Psychiatry, depressed people literally do see more in gray. Depressed patients, regardless of whether they were on antidepressants, tended to have much lower retinal reactions to black-and-white contrast differences than healthy individuals, LiveScience reports.

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