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What's with the name?

Allow us to explain.

David Lynch

what is this I don't even

Twin Peaks Reboot Rumors Surfaced, Were Then Shot Down. I’m Not Sure What My Feelings Are Doing.

Of all the news items I expected I might see today, this was not one of them. There was a rumor floating around that David Lynch met with NBC executives about a Twin Peaks reboot. My hopes were up. Then producer Mark Frost came forward and said the meeting didn’t happen. Hopes down.

Yeah. I know. Everything’s feeling very surreal and Lynchian right now.

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so long and thanks for all the fish

Character Actress Frances Bay Dies At 92. She Could “Swear Like a Fishwife.”

Frances Bay, whose career spanned decades and didn’t even start until she was in her 50s, passed away this past Thursday at the age of 92. Born in 1919 in Mannville, Alberta, Canada, she scored her first film in 1978 — Foul Play — and went on to appear in several popular TV shows and films including Happy Days, Seinfeld, and Happy Gilmore, in which she was memorably threatened by a mustachioed Ben Stiller.

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Highly Successful Marketing Strategies

Dune Activity Books Geared Toward Whom, Exactly?

What exactly do you give the nine-year old Dune fan in your life? To promote the 1984 David Lynch film version of the much-more-well-received novel, these activity and coloring books were released. Now, activity and coloring books are generally for children. Dune was rated PG-13, so most likely, kids weren’t seeing it. So, maybe this was a plot to get kids to get their parents to see the movie, which ended up flopping. But good news: there’s a no-bake spice cookie recipe in it! (Not involving awareness spectrum narcotics!) Come for the societal collapse, stay for the cookies!

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BAD IDEAS FROM SMART PEOPLE

The Glossary That Came With Dune… The Movie

As geeks, we’re no stranger to books that require a map, an appendix, and a glossary just to make sense of it all (I’m looking at you, Messers and Madams Tolkien, Stephenson, Carey, and Bishop). I must admit that the last time I read Dune, reading the glossary and appendix at the end before reading the rest of the book actually made the whole thing much easier to dive into.

But a reference sheet seems like it would make less sense appearing with a movie anywhere outside of an academic environment.  One might argue that if the audience really can’t pick up all those details from just watching the film, there’s something wrong with the filmmaking (in the case of novels with reference materials, one might also argue that there’s something wrong with the writing, but that’s a very thorny geek issue indeed).

Nevertheless, according to Blastr, Universal was so worried about David Lynch’s Dune that they actually created a two page glossary to be handed out with tickets to the movie.

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